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  1. Rebecca M. Guidice, G. Stoney Alder & Steven E. Phelan (2009). Competitive Bluffing: An Examination of a Common Practice and its Relationship with Performance. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):535 - 553.
    Bluffing, a common and consequential form of competitive behavior, has been comparably ignored in the management literature, even though misleading one's rivals is suggested to be an advantageous skill in a multifaceted and highly competitive environment. To address this deficiency and advance scholarship on competitive dynamics, our study investigates the moral reasoning behind competitive bluffing and, using a simulated market-entry game, examines the performance effects of bluffing. Findings suggest that decision makers' views on the ethicality of bluffing competitors differ from (...)
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  2. G. Stoney Alder, Marshall Schminke, Terry W. Noel & Maribeth Kuenzi (2008). Employee Reactions to Internet Monitoring: The Moderating Role of Ethical Orientation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):481 - 498.
    Research has demonstrated that employee reactions to monitoring systems depend on both the characteristics of the monitoring system and how it is implemented. However, little is known about the role individual differences may play in this process. This study proposes that individuals have generalized attitudes toward organizational control and monitoring activities. We examined this argument by assessing the relationship between employees’ baseline attitudes toward a set of monitoring and control techniques that span the employment relationship. We further explore the effects (...)
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  3. G. Stoney Alder, Marshall Schminke & Terry W. Noel (2007). The Impact of Individual Ethics on Reactions to Potentially Invasive HR Practices. Journal of Business Ethics 75 (2):201 - 214.
    In recent years, the practices of work organizations have raised increasing concerns regarding individual privacy at work. It is clear that people expect and value privacy in their personal lives. However, the extent to which privacy perceptions influence individuals’ work attitudes is less clear. Research has explored the extent to which employee perceptions of privacy derive from characteristics of the programs themselves. However, there is a paucity of research that examines how the characteristics of the individual employee may influence perceptions (...)
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  4. G. Stoney Alder & Joseph Gilbert (2006). Achieving Ethics and Fairness in Hiring: Going Beyond the Law. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (4):449 - 464.
    Since the passage of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and more recent Federal legislation, managers, regulators, and attorneys have been busy in sorting out the legal meaning of fairness in employment. While ethical managers must follow the law in their hiring practices, they cannot be satisfied with legal compliance. In this article, we first briefly summarize what the law requires in terms of fair hiring practices. We subsequently rely on multiple perspectives to explore the ethical meaning (...)
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  5. G. Stoney Alder (1998). Ethical Issues in Electronic Performance Monitoring: A Consideration of Deontological and Teleological Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (7):729-743.
    Extensive and growing use of electronic performance monitoring in organizations has resulted in considerable debate. Advocates of electronic monitoring approach the debate in teleological terms arguing that monitoring benefits organizations, customers, and society. Its critics approach the issue in deontological terms countering that monitoring is dehumanizing, invades worker privacy, increases stress and worsens health, and decreases work-life quality. In contrast to this win-lose approach, this paper argues that an approach which emphasizes communication in the design and implementation of monitoring systems (...)
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  6. M. Ambrose, G. Stoney Alder & Terry W. Noel (1998). Electronic Performance Monitoring: A Consideration of Rights. In Marshall Schminke (ed.), Managerial Ethics: Moral Management of People and Processes. Lawrence Erlbaum Assocs.. 61--80.
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