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  1. G. William Barnard (2014). Entheogens in a Religious Context: The Case of the Santo Daime Religious Tradition. Zygon 49 (3):666-684.
    This essay first draws upon the work of William James and others to propose a nonphysicalistic understanding of the relationship between the brain and consciousness in order to articulate a philosophical perspective that can understand entheogenic visionary/mystical experiences as something other than hallucinations. It then focuses on the Santo Daime tradition, a religious movement that began in Brazil in the early part of the twentieth century, to provide an example of the personal and social ramifications of taking an entheogen (ayahuasca) (...)
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  2. G. William Barnard (2012). Tuning Into Other Worlds : Henri Bergson and the Radio Reception Theory of Consciousness. In Alexandre Lefebvre & Melanie Allison White (eds.), Bergson, Politics, and Religion. Duke University Press.
     
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  3. G. William Barnard (2011). Living Consciousness: The Metaphysical Vision of Henri Bergson. State University of New York Press.
    Explores the thought of Henri Bergson, highlighting his compelling theories on the nature of consciousness and its relationship to the physical world.
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  4. G. William Barnard (2010). The Ever-New Flow of Time: Henri Bergsons View of Consciousnes. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (11-12):11-12.
    Henri Bergson created a rich and detailed theory of consciousness beginning with the publication of Time and Free Will in 1889 and continuing through the publication of The Two Sources of Morality and Religion in 1932. His theory had much in common with William James’s views in that both emphasized consciousness as a continuous process. James's famous ‘stream of consciousness’ is strikingly similar to Bergson's early notion of duration (duree), even if Bergson more strongly emphasized the temporal qualities of consciousness. (...)
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  5. G. William Barnard (2008). Pulsating with Life : The Paradoxical Intuitions of Henri Bergson. In Jorge N. Ferrer & Jacob H. Sherman (eds.), The Participatory Turn: Spirituality, Mysticism, Religious Studies. State University of New York Press.
     
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  6. G. William Barnard (2005). Pt. 3. James and Mysticism. For an Engaged Reading : William James and the Varieties of Postmodern Religious Experience / Grace M. Jantzen ; Asian Religions and Mysticism : The Legacy of William James in the Study of Religions / Richard King ; James and Freud on Mysticism / Robert A. Segal ; Mystical Assessments : Jamesian Reflections on Spiritual Judgments. [REVIEW] In Jeremy R. Carrette (ed.), William James and the Varieties of Religious Experience: A Centenary Celebration. Routledge.
  7. G. William Barnard (1998). William James and the Origins of Mystical Experience. In Robert K. C. Forman (ed.), The Innate Capacity: Mysticism, Psychology, and Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 161--210.
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