Search results for 'GW Harris' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. W. Harris, Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.) (2006). Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
    This book comprises essays in law and legal theory celebrating the life and work of Jim Harris. The topics addressed reflect the wide range of Harris's work, and the depth of his influence on legal studies. They include the nature of law and legal reasoning, rival theories of property rights and their impact on practical questions before the courts; the nature of precedent in legal argument; and the evolving concept of human rights and its place in legal discourse.
     
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  2. GW Harris (1996). Review. Intrinsic Value: Concept and Warrant. Noah Lemos. Mind 105 (419):496-500.score: 120.0
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  3. Ruth Harris (1977). Marjorie S. Harris - 1976. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 50 (4):314 - 315.score: 120.0
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  4. Heather Harris (2005). Nobody's Ever Walked Here Before Heather Harris. In Claire Smith & Hans Martin Wobst (eds.), Indigenous Archaeologies: Decolonizing Theory and Practice. Routledge. 280.score: 120.0
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  5. Joseph Harris (1995). Richard L. Harris, Ed., A Chorus of Grammars: The Correspondence of George Hickes and His Collaborators on the “Thesaurus Linguarum Septentrionalium.”(Publications of the Dictionary of Old English, 4.) Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1992. Pp. Xviii, 492; Color Frontispiece, 4 Black-and-White Plates. $69. [REVIEW] Speculum 70 (1):154-155.score: 120.0
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  6. H. S. Harris (1986). Saggio Sulla Metafisica di Harris. Idealistic Studies 16 (3):262-263.score: 120.0
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  7. Tim Harris (2013). The Intellectual Culture of Puritan Women, 1558–1680. Edited by Johanna Harris and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann. The European Legacy 18 (1):101-102.score: 120.0
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  8. James A. Harris (2005). Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The eighteenth century was a time of brilliant philosophical innovation in Britain. In Of Liberty and Necessity James A. Harris presents the first comprehensive account of the period's discussion of what remains a central problem of philosophy, the question of the freedom of the will. He offers new interpretations of contributions to the free will debate made by canonical figures such as Locke, Hume, Edwards, and Reid, and also discusses in detail the arguments of some less familiar writers. (...) puts the eighteenth-century debate about the will and its freedom in the context of the period's concern with applying what Hume calls the "experimental method of reasoning" to the human mind. His book will be of substantial interest to historians of philosophy and anyone concerned with the free will problem. (shrink)
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  9. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2009). Free Riders and Pious Sons – Why Science Research Remains Obligatory. Bioethics 23 (3):161-171.score: 60.0
    John Harris has previously proposed that there is a moral duty to participate in scientific research. This concept has recently been challenged by Iain Brassington, who asserts that the principles cited by Harris in support of the duty to research fail to establish its existence. In this paper we address these criticisms and provide new arguments for the existence of a moral obligation to research participation. This obligation, we argue, arises from two separate but related principles. The principle (...)
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  10. George W. Harris (2006). Reason's Grief: An Essay on Tragedy and Value. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In Reason's Grief, George Harris takes W. B. Yeats's comment that we begin to live only when we have conceived life as tragedy as a call for a tragic ethics, something the modern West has yet to produce. He argues that we must turn away from religious understandings of tragedy and the human condition and realize that our species will occupy a very brief period of history, at some point to disappear without a trace. We must accept an ethical (...)
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  11. John Harris (2012). What It's Like to Be Good. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (03):293-305.score: 60.0
    In this issue of CQ we introduce a new feature, in which noted bioethicists are invited to reflect on vital current issues. Our first invitee, John Harris, will subsequently assume editorship of this section.
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  12. R. Baine Harris (ed.) (1976). The Significance of Neoplatonism. Distributed by State University of New York Press.score: 60.0
    A Brief Description of Neoplatonism R. Baine Harris Old Dominion University There are essentially three ways in which Neoplatonism may be considered to be ...
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  13. Errol E. Harris (2000). Apocalypse and Paradigm: Science and Everyday Thinking. Praeger.score: 60.0
    Harris seeks to diagnose the ailment that infects contemporary thinking and prevents adequate measures from being taken to counter the dangerous effect of the ...
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  14. Nigel Harris (2003). The Return of Cosmopolitan Capital: Globalisation, the State, and War. In the U.S. And Canada Distributed by Palgrave Macmillan.score: 60.0
    Nigel Harris argues that the notion of national capital is becoming redundant as cities and their citizens, increasingly unaffected by borders and national boundaries, take center stage in the economic world. Harris deconstructs this phenomenon and argues for the immense benefits it could and should have, not just for western wealth, but for economies worldwide, for international communication and for global democracy.
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  15. David Harris (2003). Teaching Yourself Social Theory. Sage Publications.score: 60.0
    `Social theory is a very difficult subject to teach and it is one that students generally find hard to get to grips with. Teaching Yourself Social Theory offers a highly original and comprehensive resource that will be welcomed by students and teachers alike' - Barry Smart, University of Portsmouth `I have no hesitation in recommending Harris' text to students and teachers of social theory' - Sociology This refreshing and accessible text demonstrates how social theory can be made into an (...)
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  16. Michael J. Harris (2013). Audi Rationality and Religious Commitment (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011). Pp. Xvi + 311. £25.00 (Hbk). ISBN 978 0 19 960957 4. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 49 (1):130-134.score: 60.0
    Book Reviews MICHAEL J. HARRIS, Religious Studies , FirstView Article(s).
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  17. John Harris (2007). Enhancing Evolution: The Ethical Case for Making Better People. Princeton University Press.score: 60.0
    In Enhancing Evolution, leading bioethicist John Harris dismantles objections to genetic engineering, stem-cell research, designer babies, and cloning and makes an ethical case for biotechnology that is both forthright and rigorous.
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  18. John Harris (ed.) (2001). Bioethics. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    The Oxford Readings in Philosophy series brings together important recent writing in major areas of philosophical enquiry, selected from a variety of sources which may not be conveniently available to the university student or general reader. In this volume, John Harris presents the examples of the very best philosophical writing in bioethics from an internationally renowned list of contributors; authors featured include Peter Singer, Helga Kuhse, Tom Beauchamp, Ruth Macklin, and Ronald Dworkin. The book begins with a substantial overview (...)
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  19. Daniel Harris (2000). Cute, Quaint, Hungry, and Romantic: The Aesthetics of Consumerism. Basic Books.score: 60.0
    Why has the ring of the telephone become a beep? What ever happened to the bumpers and fenders of cars? Why do food commercials never mention hunger?In this encyclopedia of low-brow aesthetics, Daniel Harris concentrates on the nuances of non-art, the uses of the useless, the politics of product design and advertising. We learn how advertisers exaggerate our sensual responses to eating, how close-up nature photography exaggerates the accessibility of the natural world, and how the mutated physiology of dolls (...)
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  20. Sam Harris (2012). Free Will. Free Press.score: 60.0
    A BELIEF IN FREE WILL touches nearly everything that human beings value. It is difficult to think about law, politics, religion, public policy, intimate relationships, morality—as well as feelings of remorse or personal achievement—without first imagining that every person is the true source of his or her thoughts and actions. And yet the facts tell us that free will is an illusion. In this enlightening book, Sam Harris argues that this truth about the human mind does not undermine morality (...)
     
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  21. Henry Harris (ed.) (1995). Identity: Essays Based on Herbert Spencer Lectures Given in the University of Oxford. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    Who am I, and what am I? The question is one asked through the ages, answered in various ways in different disciplines. Identity is a matter of intellectual interest but also of personal and practical interest, attracting attention and stimulating controversy outside the ranks of the specialists. This volume offers a comparison and cross-fertilization of insights and theories from various disciplines in which identity is a key concept. -/- Identity contains essays by six internationally famous contributors, focusing on different facets (...)
     
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  22. Rom Harré & Roy Harris (eds.) (1993). Linguistics and Philosophy: The Controversial Interface. Pergamon Press.score: 60.0
    As hopes that generative linguistics might solve philosophical problems about the mind give way to disillusionment, old problems concerning the relationship between linguistics and philosophy survive unresolved. This collection surveys the historical engagement between the two, and opens up avenues for further reflection. In Part 1 two contrasting views are presented of the interface nowadays called 'philosophy of linguistics'. Part 2 gives a detailed historical survey of the engagement of analytic philosophy with linguistic problems during the present century, and sees (...)
     
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  23. John Harris (2004). On Cloning. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Cloning - few words have as much potential to grip our imagination or grab the headlines. No longer the stuff of science fiction or Star Wars - it is happening now. Yet human cloning is currently banned throughout the world, and therapeutic cloning banned in many countries. In this highly controversial book, John Harris does a lot more than ask why we are so afraid of cloning. He presents a deft and informed defence of human cloning, carefully exposing the (...)
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  24. J. W. Harris (2002). Property and Justice. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    When philosophers put forward claims for or against 'property', it is often unclear whether they are talking about the same thing that lawyers mean by 'property'. Likewise, when lawyers appeal to 'justice' in interpreting or criticizing legal rules we do not know if they have in mind something that philosophers would recognize as 'justice'. -/- Bridging the gulf between juristic writing on property and speculations about it appearing in the tradition of western political philosophy, Professor Harris has built from (...)
     
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  25. Sam Harris (2010). The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values. Free Press.score: 60.0
    Bestselling author Sam Harris dismantles the most common justification for religious faith-that a moral system cannot be based on science.
     
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  26. John Harris (1992). Wonderwoman and Superman: The Ethics of Human Biotechnology. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Since the birth of the first test-tube baby, Louise Brown, in 1977, we have seen truly remarkable advances in biotechnology. We can now screen the fetus for Down Syndrome, Spina Bifida, and a wide range of genetic disorders. We can rearrange genes in DNA chains and redirect the evolution of species. We can record an individual's genetic fingerprint. And we can potentially insert genes into human DNA that will produce physical warning signs of cancer, allowing early detection. In fact, biotechnology (...)
     
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  27. Kathleen H. Corriveau, Angie L. Kim, Courtney E. Schwalen & Paul L. Harris (2009). Abraham Lincoln and Harry Potter: Children's Differentiation Between Historical and Fantasy Characters. Cognition 113 (2):213-225.score: 40.0
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  28. J. Driver (2001). HARRIS, GW-Agent-Centered Morality. Philosophical Books 42 (3):217-219.score: 36.0
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  29. John Harris (1999). The Concept of the Person and the Value of Life. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (4):293-308.score: 30.0
    : The concept of the person has come to be intimately connected with questions about the value of life. It is applied to those sorts of beings who have some special value or moral importance and where we need to prioritize the needs or claims of different sorts of individuals. "Person" is a concept designating individuals like us in some important respects, but possibly including individuals who are very unlike us in other respects. What are these respects and why are (...)
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  30. George W. Harris (1986). Fathers and Fetuses. Ethics 96 (3):594-603.score: 30.0
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  31. Howard Harris (2001). Content Analysis of Secondary Data: A Study of Courage in Managerial Decision Making. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 34 (3-4):191 - 208.score: 30.0
    Empirical studies in business ethics often rely on self-reported data, but this reliance is open to criticism. Responses to questionnaires and interviews may be influenced by the subject''s view of what the researcher might want to hear, by a reluctance to talk about sensitive ethical issues, and by imperfect recall. This paper reviews the extent to which published research in business ethics relies on interviews and questionnaires, and then explores the possibilities of using secondary data, such as company documents and (...)
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  32. Paul G. Harris (2003). Fairness, Responsibility, and Climate Change. Ethics and International Affairs 17 (1):149–156.score: 30.0
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  33. Amanda Barnier, John Sutton, Celia Harris & Robert A. Wilson (2008). A Conceptual and Empirical Framework for the Social Distribution of Cognition: The Case of Memory. Cognitive Systems Research 9 (1):33-51.score: 30.0
  34. Christopher R. Harris (1991). Digitization and Manipulation of News Photographs. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 6 (3):164 – 174.score: 30.0
    The advent of computer-assisted digital manipulation has raised new ethical concerns in news photography. A series of recent questionable manipulations in news magazines gives rise to a call for some systematic decision making and accountability. Protocols rather than codes of ethics are called for.
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  35. Claudia Harris & William Brown (1990). Developmental Constraints on Ethical Behavior in Business. Journal of Business Ethics 9 (11):855 - 862.score: 30.0
    Ethical behavior — the conscious attempt to act in accordance with an individually-owned morality — is the product of an advanced stage of the maturing process. Three models of ethical growth derived from research in human development are applied to issues of business ethics.
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  36. P. F. Harris (1992). From Simulation to Folk Psychology: The Case for Development. Mind and Language 7 (1-2):120-144.score: 30.0
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  37. H. S. Harris (1982). Language and Perception in Hegel and Wittgenstein. Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (4).score: 30.0
  38. H. Harris (1995). An Experimentalist Looks at Identity. In , Identity. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  39. Todd Harris (2003). Data Models and the Acquisition and Manipulation of Data. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1508-1517.score: 30.0
    This paper offers an account of data manipulation in scientific experiments. It will be shown that in many cases raw, unprocessed data is not produced, but rather a form of processed data that will be referred to as a data model. The language of data models will be used to provide a framework within which to understand a recent debate about the status of data and data manipulation. It will be seen that a description in terms of data models allows (...)
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  40. Donald Baack, Christine Fogliasso & James Harris (2000). The Personal Imapact of Ethical Decisiosn: A Social Penetration Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 24 (1):39 - 49.score: 30.0
    There are gaps in the Social and Ethical issues literature regarding the structure of individual ethical reasoning and the process through which personal ethical standards erode or decline. Social Penetration Theory may be used to view ethical issues of low, moderate, or high salience. It also produces a model of the process by which an individual turns to less desirable ethical reasoning and behavior.
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  41. George W. Harris (1989). A Paradoxical Departure From Consequentialism. Journal of Philosophy 86 (2):90-102.score: 30.0
  42. John Harris (1998). Four Legs Good, Personhood Better! Res Publica 4 (1):51-58.score: 30.0
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  43. Errol E. Harris (1984). Hegel's Dialectic and its Criticism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (3):383-385.score: 30.0
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  44. John Barkdull & Paul G. Harris (1998). The Land Ethic: A New Philosophy for International Relations. Ethics and International Affairs 12 (1):159–177.score: 30.0
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  45. James R. Harris (1990). Ethical Values of Individuals at Different Levels in the Organizational Hierarchy of a Single Firm. Journal of Business Ethics 9 (9):741 - 750.score: 30.0
    This study examines the ethical values of respondents by level in the organizational hierarchy of a single firm. It also explores the possible impacts of gender, education and years of experience on respondents' values as well as their perceptions of how the organization and professional associations influence their personal values. Results showed that, although there were differences in individuals' ethical values by hierarchical level, significantly more differences were observed by the length of tenure with the organization. While respondents, as a (...)
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  46. Errol E. Harris (1957). Collingwood's Theory of History. Philosophical Quarterly 7 (26):35-49.score: 30.0
  47. Fred Harris (2007). Dewey's Concepts of Stability and Precariousness in His Philosophy of Education. Education and Culture 23 (1):38-54.score: 30.0
    : This article connects two of Dewey's generic traits of existence—stability and precariousness—to four elements specified in his preface to Democracy and Education (democracy, evolution, industrialization and the experimental method) and one element specified in his preface to How We Think (childhood). It argues that Dewey's metaphysics of stability and precariousness is implicit in his philosophy of education and provides a unifying aspect to his philosophy of education that is relevant to the modern world. The article then briefly looks at (...)
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  48. John Harris (1982). Bad Samaritans Cause Harm. Philosophical Quarterly 32 (126):60-69.score: 30.0
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  49. John Harris (1994). Does Justice Require That We Be Ageist? Bioethics 8 (1):74–83.score: 30.0
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