Search results for 'Gaia hypothesis' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. J. Baird Callicott (2010). Toward an Earth Ethic: Aldo Leopold's Anticipation of the Gaia Hypothesis. Dialogue and Universalism 20 (11):21.score: 45.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Dirk Baltzly (2009). Gaia Gets to Know Herself : Proclus on the Self-Perception of the Cosmos. Phronesis 54:261-85.score: 42.0
    Proclus’ interpretation of the Timaeus confronts the question of whether the living being that is the Platonic cosmos percieves itself. Since sense perception is a mixed blessing in the Platonic tradition, Proclus solves this problem by differentiating different gradations of perception. The cosmos has only the highest kind. This paper contrasts Proclus’ account of the world’s perception of itself with James Lovelock’s notion that the planet Earth, or Gaia, is aware of things going on within itself. This contrast illuminates (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Eileen Crist & H. Bruce Rinker (eds.) (2010). Gaia in Turmoil: Climate Change, Biodepletion, and Earth Ethics in an Age of Crisis. Mit Press.score: 39.0
    Essays link Gaian science to such global environmental quandaries as climate change and biodiversity destruction, providing perspectives from science, ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Paul Devereux (1992). Earthmind: Communicating with the Living World of Gaia. Distributed to the Book Trade in the United States by American International Distribution Corporation.score: 39.0
  5. Lawrence E. Joseph (1991). Gaia: The Growth of an Idea. Viking Penguin.score: 39.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Kit Pedler (1979/1991). The Quest for Gaia: A Book of Changes. Paladin.score: 39.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Richard Doyle (2011). Darwin's Pharmacy: Sex, Plants, and the Evolution of the Noosphere. University of Washington Press.score: 30.0
  8. Edward Goldsmith (1992/1993). The Way: An Ecological World-View. Distributed in the U.S. By Random House.score: 30.0
    Revised to include a glossary, index, bibliographic notes, and several updated chapters, this is a major work by one of our boldest and most promising thinkers.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. David Lorimer (ed.) (1999). The Spirit of Science: From Experiment to Experience. Continuum.score: 30.0
  10. Philip W. Sutton (2004). Nature, Environment, and Society. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 30.0
    How have sociologists responded to the emergence of environmentalism? What has sociology to offer the study of environmental problems? This uniquely comprehensive guide traces the origins and development of environmental movements and environmental issues, providing a critical review of the most significant debates in the new field of environmental sociology. It covers environmental ideas, environmental movements, social constructionism, critical realism, "ecocentric" theory, environmental identities, risk society theory, sustainable development, Green consumerism, ecological modernization and debates around modernity and post- modernity. Philip (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Arthur Falk (1995). Gaia = Māyā. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 17 (3):485 - 502.score: 24.0
    I define the Gaia hypothesis as the descriptive claim, supposedly supported by biology and the earth sciences, that there's a fitness for one-and-all, and the owner of that fitness is Gaia. Much of the argument for Gaia turns on the supposed discovery of negative feedback loops serving its fitness. I present an argument against such a fitness, and so against Gaia. I distinguish two types of negative feedback systems. Systems in the engineering sense are information (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Rafal Serafin (1988). Noosphere, Gaia, and the Science of the Biosphere. Environmental Ethics 10 (2):121-137.score: 24.0
    Advances in analytical understanding of the biosphere’s biogeochemical cycles have spawned concepts of Gaia and noosphere. Earlier in this century, in concert with the Jesuit paleontologist Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, the natural scientist Vladimir Vernadsky developed the notion of noosphere-an evolving collective human consciousness on Earth exerting an ever increasing intluence on biogeochemical processes. More recently, the chemist James Lovelock postulated the Earth to be a self-regulating system made up of biota and their environment with the capacity to maintain (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Sam Coleman (2009). Why the Ability Hypothesis is Best Forgotten. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (2-3):74-97.score: 18.0
    According to the knowledge argument, physicalism fails because when physically omniscient Mary first sees red, her gain in phenomenal knowledge involves a gain in factual knowledge. Thus not all facts are physical facts. According to the ability hypothesis, the knowledge argument fails because Mary only acquires abilities to imagine, remember and recognise redness, and not new factual knowledge. I argue that reducing Mary’s new knowledge to abilities does not affect the issue of whether she also learns factually: I show (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Yuri Cath (2009). The Ability Hypothesis and the New Knowledge-How. Noûs 43 (1):137-156.score: 18.0
    What follows for the ability hypothesis reply to the knowledge argument if knowledge-how is just a form of knowledge-that? The obvious answer is that the ability hypothesis is false. For the ability hypothesis says that, when Mary sees red for the first time, Frank Jackson’s super-scientist gains only knowledge-how and not knowledge-that. In this paper I argue that this obvious answer is wrong: a version of the ability hypothesis might be true even if knowledge-how is a (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Torin Alter (2001). Know-How, Ability, and the Ability Hypothesis. Theoria 67 (3):229-39.score: 18.0
    David Lewis (1983, 1988) and Laurence Nemirow (1980, 1990) claim that knowing what an experience is like is knowing-how, not knowing-that. They identify this know-how with the abilities to remember, imagine, and recognize experiences, and Lewis labels their view ‘the Ability Hypothesis’. The Ability Hypothesis has intrinsic interest. But Lewis and Nemirow devised it specifically to block certain anti-physicalist arguments due to Thomas Nagel (1974, 1986) and Frank Jackson (1982, 1986). Does it?
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. William E. S. McNeill (2012). Embodiment and the Perceptual Hypothesis. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):569 - 591.score: 18.0
    The Perceptual Hypothesis is that we sometimes see, and thereby have non-inferential knowledge of, others' mental features. The Perceptual Hypothesis opposes Inferentialism, which is the view that our knowledge of others' mental features is always inferential. The claim that some mental features are embodied is the claim that some mental features are realised by states or processes that extend beyond the brain. The view I discuss here is that the Perceptual Hypothesis is plausible if, but only if, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Bence Nanay (2009). Imagining, Recognizing and Discriminating: Reconsidering the Ability Hypothesis. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (3):699-717.score: 18.0
    According to the Ability Hypothesis, knowing what it is like to have experience E is just having the ability to imagine or recognize or remember having experience E. I examine various versions of the Ability Hypothesis and point out that they all face serious objections. Then I propose a new version that is not vulnerable to these objections: knowing what it is like to experience E is having the ability todiscriminate imagining or having experience E from imagining or (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Ezequiel Di Paolo & Hanne De Jaegher (2012). The Interactive Brain Hypothesis. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    Enactive approaches foreground the role of interpersonal interaction in explanations of social understanding. This motivates, in combination with a recent interest in neuroscientific studies involving actual interactions, the question of how interactive processes relate to neural mechanisms involved in social understanding. We introduce the Interactive Brain Hypothesis (IBH) in order to help map the spectrum of possible relations between social interaction and neural processes. The hypothesis states that interactive experience and skills play enabling roles in both the development (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Gunnar Björnsson (2011). Joint Responsibility Without Individual Control: Applying the Explanation Hypothesis. In Jeroen van den Hoven, Ibo van de Poel & Nicole Vincent (eds.), Compatibilist Responsibility: beyond free will and determinism. Springer.score: 18.0
    This paper introduces a new family of cases where agents are jointly morally responsible for outcomes over which they have no individual control, a family that resists standard ways of understanding outcome responsibility. First, the agents in these cases do not individually facilitate the outcomes and would not seem individually responsible for them if the other agents were replaced by non-agential causes. This undermines attempts to understand joint responsibility as overlapping individual responsibility; the responsibility in question is essentially joint. Second, (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Toby Svoboda (2012). The Ethics of Geoengineering: Moral Considerability and the Convergence Hypothesis. Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (3):243-256.score: 18.0
    Although it could avoid some harmful effects of climate change, sulphate aerosol geoengineering (SAG), or injecting sulphate aerosols into the stratosphere in order to reflect incoming solar radiation, threatens substantial harm to humans and non-humans. I argue that SAG is prima facie ethically problematic from anthropocentric, animal liberationist, and biocentric perspectives. This might be taken to suggest that ethical evaluations of SAG can rely on Bryan Norton's convergence hypothesis, which predicts that anthropocentrists and non-anthropocentrists will agree to implement the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. D. Evans (2002). The Search Hypothesis of Emotions. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (4):497-509.score: 18.0
    Many philosophers and psychologists now argue that emotions play a vital role in reasoning. This paper explores one particular way of elucidating how emotions help reason which may be dubbed ?the search hypothesis of emotion?. After outlining the search hypothesis of emotion and dispensing with a red herring that has marred previous statements of the hypothesis, I discuss two alternative readings of the search hypothesis. It is argued that the search hypothesis must be construed as (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Peter Mark Ainsworth (2008). Cosmic Inflation and the Past Hypothesis. Synthese 162 (2):157 - 165.score: 18.0
    The past hypothesis is that the entropy of the universe was very low in the distant past. It is put forward to explain the entropic arrow of time but it has been suggested (e.g. [Penrose, R. (1989a). The emperor’s new mind. London:Vintage Books; Penrose, R. (1989b). Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 571, 249–264; Price, H. (1995). In S. F. Savitt (Ed.), Times’s arrows today. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; Price, H. (1996). Time’s arrow and Archimedes’ point. Oxford: (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Mario Bacelar Valente, Time in the Theory of Relativity: On Natural Clocks, Proper Time, the Clock Hypothesis, and All That.score: 18.0
    When addressing the notion of proper time in the theory of relativity, it is usually taken for granted that the time read by an accelerated clock is given by the Minkowski proper time. However, there are authors like Harvey Brown that consider necessary an extra assumption to arrive at this result, the so-called clock hypothesis. In opposition to Brown, Richard TW Arthur takes the clock hypothesis to be already implicit in the theory. In this paper I will present (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Samuel C. Fletcher (2013). Light Clocks and the Clock Hypothesis. Foundations of Physics 43 (11):1369-1383.score: 18.0
    The clock hypothesis of relativity theory equates the proper time experienced by a point particle along a timelike curve with the length of that curve as determined by the metric. Is it possible to prove that particular types of clocks satisfy the clock hypothesis, thus genuinely measure proper time, at least approximately? Because most real clocks would be enormously complicated to study in this connection, focusing attention on an idealized light clock is attractive. The present paper extends and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Sara Schwartz (2002). Characters as Units and the Case of the Presence and Absence Hypothesis. Biology and Philosophy 17 (3):369-388.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses the individuation of characters for the use asunits by geneticists at the beginning of the 20th century. Thediscussion involves the Presence and Absence Hypothesis as a case study. It issuggested that the gap between conceptual consideration and etiological factorsof individuating of characters is being handled by way of mutual adjustment.Confrontation of a suggested morphological unit character with experimentresults molded the final boundaries of it.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. W. Ford Doolittle (forthcoming). Natural Selection Through Survival Alone, and the Possibility of Gaia. Biology and Philosophy:1-9.score: 18.0
    Here I advance two related evolutionary propositions. (1) Natural selection is most often considered to require competition between reproducing “individuals”, sometimes quite broadly conceived, as in cases of clonal, species or multispecies-community selection. But differential survival of non-competing and non-reproducing individuals will also result in increasing frequencies of survival-promoting “adaptations” among survivors, and thus is also a kind of natural selection. (2) Darwinists have challenged the view that the Earth’s biosphere is an evolved global homeostatic system. Since there is only (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. David Kyle Johnson (forthcoming). The Failure of the Multiverse Hypothesis as a Solution to the Problem of No Best World. Sophia:1-19.score: 18.0
    The multiverse hypothesis is growing in popularity among theistic philosophers because some view it as the preferable way to solve certain difficulties presented by theistic belief. In this paper, I am concerned specifically with its application to Rowe’s problem of no best world, which suggests that God’s existence is impossible given the fact that the world God actualizes must be unsurpassable, yet for any given possible world, there is one greater. I will argue that, as a solution to the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Marcus Cheetham, Pascal Suter & Lutz Jäncke (2011). The Human Likeness Dimension of the “Uncanny Valley Hypothesis”: Behavioral and Functional MRI Findings. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:126.score: 18.0
    The uncanny valley hypothesis (Mori, 1970) predicts differential experience of negative and positive affect as a function of human likeness. Affective experience of realistic humanlike robots and computer-generated characters (avatars) dominates “uncanny” research, but findings are inconsistent. How objects are actually perceived along the hypothesis’ dimension of human likeness (DOH), defined only in terms of human physical similarity, is unknown. To examine whether the DOH can be defined also in terms of effects of categorical perception (CP), stimuli from (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Kristin Andrews & Brian Huss (forthcoming). Anthropomorphism, Anthropectomy, and the Null Hypothesis. Biology and Philosophy:1-19.score: 18.0
    We examine the claim that the methodology of psychology leads to a bias in animal cognition research against attributing “anthropomorphic” properties to animals (Sober in Thinking with animals: new perspectives on anthropomorphism. Columbia University Press, New York, pp 85–99, 2005; de Waal in Philos Top 27:225–280, 1999). This charge is examined in light of a debate on the role of folk psychology between primatologists who emphasize similarities between humans and other apes, and those who emphasize differences. We argue that while (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Igor Douven & Richard Dietz (2011). A Puzzle About Stalnaker's Hypothesis. Topoi 30 (1):31-37.score: 18.0
    According to Stalnaker’s Hypothesis, the probability of an indicative conditional, $\Pr(\varphi \rightarrow \psi),$ equals the probability of the consequent conditional on its antecedent, $\Pr(\psi | \varphi)$ . While the hypothesis is generally taken to have been conclusively refuted by Lewis’ and others’ triviality arguments, its descriptive adequacy has been confirmed in many experimental studies. In this paper, we consider some possible ways of resolving the apparent tension between the analytical and the empirical results relating to Stalnaker’s Hypothesis (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. A. D. Patel (2010). Why Would Musical Training Benefit the Neural Encoding of Speech? The OPERA Hypothesis. Frontiers in Psychology 2:142-142.score: 18.0
    Mounting evidence suggests that musical training benefits the neural encoding of speech. This paper offers a hypothesis specifying why such benefits occur. The “OPERA” hypothesis proposes that such benefits are driven by adaptive plasticity in speech-processing networks, and that this plasticity occurs when five conditions are met. These are: 1) Overlap: there is anatomical overlap in the brain networks that process an acoustic feature used in both music and speech (e.g., waveform periodicity, amplitude envelope), 2) Precision: music places (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Manuel G. Bedia & Ezequiel Di Paolo (2012). Unreliable Gut Feelings Can Lead to Correct Decisions: The Somatic Marker Hypothesis in Non-Linear Decision Chains. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Dual system approaches of decision making examine the interaction between affective/intuitive and deliberative processes underlying value judgment. Decisions are arise from a combination of relatively explicit capabilities for abstract reasoning and relatively implicit evolved domain-general as well as learned domain-specific affective responses. One such approach, the somatic markers hypothesis (SMH), expresses these processes as a system of evolved primary emotions supplemented by associations between affect and experience that accrue over lifetime, or somatic markers (SMs). In this view, SMs are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Marcus Cheetham, Ivana Pavlovic, Nicola Jordan, Pascal Suter & Lutz Jancke (2013). Category Processing and the Human Likeness Dimension of the Uncanny Valley Hypothesis: Eye-Tracking Data. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    The Uncanny Valley Hypothesis (Mori, 1970) predicts that perceptual difficulty distinguishing between a humanlike object (e.g., lifelike prosthetic hand, mannequin) and its human counterpart evokes negative affect. Research has focussed on affect, with inconsistent results, but little is known about how objects along the hypothesis’ dimension of human likeness (DHL) are actually perceived. This study used morph continua based on human and highly realistic computer-generated (avatar) faces to represent the DHL. Total number and dwell time of fixations to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Isabelle Ecuyer-Dab & Michèle Robert (2007). The Female Advantage in Object Location Memory According to the Foraging Hypothesis: A Critical Analysis. [REVIEW] Human Nature 18 (4):365-385.score: 18.0
    According to the evolutionary hypothesis of Silverman and Eals (1992, Sex differences in spatial abilities: Evolutionary theory and data. In J. H. Barkow, L. Cosmides, & J. Tooby (Eds.), The adapted mind: Evolutionary psychology and the generation of culture (pp. 533–549). Oxford: Oxford University Press), women evolutionary hypothesis, women surpass men in object location memory as a result of a sexual division in foraging activities among early humans. After surveying the main anthropological information on ancestral sex-related foraging, we (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Daniel M. T. Fessler (2007). Neglected Natural Experiments Germane to the Westermarck Hypothesis. Human Nature 18 (4):355-364.score: 18.0
    Natural experiments wherein preferred marriage partners are co-reared play a central role in testing the Westermarck hypothesis. This paper reviews two such hitherto largely neglected experiments. The case of the Karo Batak is outlined in hopes that other scholars will procure additional information; the case of the Oneida community is examined in detail. Genealogical records reveal that, despite practicing communal child-rearing, marriages did take place within Oneida. However, when records are compared with first-person accounts, it becomes clear that, owing (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Moti Gitik & Saharon Shelah (2001). On Some Configurations Related to the Shelah Weak Hypothesis. Archive for Mathematical Logic 40 (8):639-650.score: 18.0
    We show that some cardinal arithmetic configurations related to the negation of the Shelah Weak Hypothesis and natural from the forcing point of view are impossible.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Gagan Deep Kaur (forthcoming). Kant and the Simulation Hypothesis. AI and Society:1-10.score: 18.0
    Computational imagination (CI) conceives imagination as an agent’s simulated sensorimotor interaction with the environment in the absence of sensory feedback, predicting consequences based on this interaction (Marques and Holland in Neurocomputing 72:743–759, 2009). Its bedrock is the simulation hypothesis whereby imagination resembles seeing or doing something in reality as both involve similar neural structures in the brain (Hesslow in Trends Cogn Sci 6(6):242–247, 2002). This paper raises two-forked doubts: (1) neural-level equivalence is escalated to make phenomenological equivalence. Even at (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Miloš S. Kurilić (2005). Mad Families, Forcing and the Suslin Hypothesis. Archive for Mathematical Logic 44 (4):499-512.score: 18.0
    Let κ be a regular cardinal and P a partial ordering preserving the regularity of κ. If P is (κ-Baire and) of density κ, then there is a mad family on κ killed in all generic extensions (if and) only if below each p∈P there exists a κ-sized antichain. In this case a mad family on κ is killed (if and) only if there exists an injection from κ onto a dense subset of Ult(P) mapping the elements of onto nowhere (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Nicholas D. Lange, Rick P. Thomas & Eddy J. Davelaar (2012). Temporal Dynamics of Hypothesis Generation: The Influences of Data Serial Order, Data Consistency, and Elicitation Timing. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    The pre-decisional process of hypothesis generation is a ubiquitous cognitive faculty that we continually employ in an effort to understand our environment and thereby support appropriate judgments and decisions. Although we are beginning to understand the fundamental processes underlying hypothesis generation, little is known about how various temporal dynamics, inherent in real world generation tasks, influence the retrieval of hypotheses from long-term memory. This paper presents two experiments investigating three data acquisition dynamics in a simulated medical diagnosis task. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Ezequiel Di Paolo Manuel G. Bedia (2012). Unreliable Gut Feelings Can Lead to Correct Decisions: The Somatic Marker Hypothesis in Non-Linear Decision Chains. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Dual system approaches of decision making examine the interaction between affective/intuitive and deliberative processes underlying value judgment. Decisions are arise from a combination of relatively explicit capabilities for abstract reasoning and relatively implicit evolved domain-general as well as learned domain-specific affective responses. One such approach, the somatic markers hypothesis (SMH), expresses these processes as a system of evolved primary emotions supplemented by associations between affect and experience that accrue over lifetime, or somatic markers (SMs). In this view, SMs are (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Frank Marlowe (2000). The Patriarch Hypothesis. Human Nature 11 (1):27-42.score: 18.0
    Menopause is puzzling because life-history theory predicts there should be no selection for outliving one’s reproductive capacity. Adaptive explanations of menopause offered thus far turn on women’s long-term investment in offspring and grandoffspring, all variations on the grandmother hypothesis. Here, I offer a very different explanation. The patriarch hypothesis proposes that once males became capable of maintaining high status and reproductive access beyond their peak physical condition, selection favored the extension of maximum life span in males. Because the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Eddy J. Davelaar Nicholas D. Lange, Rick P. Thomas (2012). Temporal Dynamics of Hypothesis Generation: The Influences of Data Serial Order, Data Consistency, and Elicitation Timing. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    The pre-decisional process of hypothesis generation is a ubiquitous cognitive faculty that we continually employ in an effort to understand our environment and thereby support appropriate judgments and decisions. Although we are beginning to understand the fundamental processes underlying hypothesis generation, little is known about how various temporal dynamics, inherent in real world generation tasks, influence the retrieval of hypotheses from long-term memory. This paper presents two experiments investigating three data acquisition dynamics in a simulated medical diagnosis task. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Romeijn Jan-Willem Rens Van de Schoot, Herbert Hoijtink (2011). Moving Beyond Traditional Null Hypothesis Testing: Evaluating Expectations Directly. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 18.0
    This mini-review illustrates that testing the traditional null hypothesis is not always the appropriate strategy. Half in jest, we discuss Aristotle’s scientific investigations into the shape of the earth in the context of evaluating the traditional null hypothesis. We conclude that Aristotle was actually interested in evaluating informative hypotheses. In contemporary science the situation is not much different. That is, many researchers have no particular interest in the traditional null hypothesis. More can be learned from data by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Gloria Comesaña Santalices (2010). Reconciliarse con Gaia en un mundo dominado por la razón tecnológica. Utopía y Praxis Latinoamericana 15 (51):127-140.score: 18.0
    Aunque construir el mundo humano implica violencia, hemos de reducir la depredación de la naturaleza y los riesgos de la industrialización y consumo masivos que amenazan con destruir totalmente nuestro soporte biótico. La necesidad de reconciliarnos con Gaia es imperativa, y para ello debemos const..
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Robert D. Rupert (2004). Challenges to the Hypothesis of Extended Cognition. Journal of Philosophy 101 (8):389-428.score: 15.0
  46. Donato Bergandi (2000). Eco-Cybernetics: The Ecology and Cybernetics of Missing Emergences. Kybernetes 29 (7/8):928-942..score: 15.0
    Considers that in ecosystem, landscape and global ecology, an energetics reading of ecological systems is an expression of a cybernetic, systemic and holistic approach. In ecosystem ecology, the Odumian paradigm emphasizes the concept of emergence, but it has not been accompanied by the creation of a method that fully respects the complexity of the objects studied. In landscape ecology, although the emergentist, multi-level, triadic methodology of J.K. Feibleman and D.T. Campbell has gained acceptance, the importance of emergent properties is still (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Florian Cova (2013). Unconsidered Intentional Actions: An Assessment of Scaife and Webber's 'Consideration Hypothesis'. Journal of Moral Philosophy (1):1-22.score: 15.0
  48. John Symons (2001). Explanation, Representation and the Dynamical Hypothesis. Minds and Machines 11 (4):521-541.score: 15.0
    This paper challenges arguments that systematic patterns of intelligent behavior license the claim that representations must play a role in the cognitive system analogous to that played by syntactical structures in a computer program. In place of traditional computational models, I argue that research inspired by Dynamical Systems theory can support an alternative view of representations. My suggestion is that we treat linguistic and representational structures as providing complex multi-dimensional targets for the development of individual brains. This approach acknowledges the (...)
    Direct download (18 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Dirk Baltzly (2009). Gaia Gets to Know Herself: Proclus on the World's Self-Perception. Phronesis 54 (3):261-285.score: 15.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Thomas Natsoulas (1996). The Sciousness Hypothesis: Part I. Journal of Mind and Behavior 17 (1):45-66.score: 15.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000