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  1. Galia Patt-Shamir (2012). Filial Piety, Vital Power, and a Moral Sense of Immortality in Zhang Zai's Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):223-239.
    The present article focuses on Zhang Zai’s 張載 attitude toward death and its moral significance. It launches with the unusual link between the opening statement of the Western Inscription 西銘 regarding heaven and earth as parents and the conclusion that serving one’s cosmic parents during life, one is peaceful in death. Through the analogy of human relations with heaven and earth as filial piety (xiao 孝), Zhang Zai sets a framework for an understanding that being filial through life eliminates the (...)
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  2. Galia Patt-Shamir (2011). The “Dual Citizenship” of Emptiness: A Reading of the Bu Zhenkong Lun. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):474-490.
  3. Galia Patt-Shamir (2011). The Limits of Empathy - A Mengzi'an Perspective. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (2):253-274.
    This article suggests how Mengzian ideas of the way [dao], rightness [yi] and rites [li], as related to the presupposition that human nature is moral, respond to rigid notions of “truth” and “law,” which tolerate a banalization of evil. It further suggests that the Mengzian attitude is both rooted in human empathy and draws clear limits to it. This is demonstrated by responding to arguments raised by the protagonist Max Aue in Jonathan Little’s book The Kindly Ones.
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  4. Galia Patt-Shamir (2010). The Value in Storytelling: Women's Life-Stories in Confucianism and Judaism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):175-191.
    This essay retells the stories of four exemplary women from Confucianism and Judaism, hoping that the tension these stories exhibit can teach us something about women’s lives within the boundaries of tradition, then and now. It refers to two ideal “family caretakers”: M eng Mu 孟母, who devoted her life to her son’s learning, and Rachel, who devoted her life to her husband, the famous Rabbi Akiva. Then it tells the stories of two almost completely opposing exemplary figures: The sages (...)
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  5. Galia Patt-shamir (2009). Learning and Women: Confucianism Revisited. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (2):243-260.
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  6. Galia Patt-Shamir (2009). To Live a Riddle: The Transformative Aspect of the Laozi. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (3):408-423.
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  7. Galia Patt-Shamir (2008). From Li to Li : A Pragmatist Implication of Cheng Chung-Ying's Onto-Hermeneutics. In Zhongying Cheng & On Cho Ng (eds.), The Imperative of Understanding: Chinese Philosophy, Comparative Philosophy, and Onto-Hermeneutics: A Tribute Volume Dedicated to Professor Chung-Ying Cheng. Global Scholarly Publications.
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  8. Galia Patt-Shamir (2006). To Broaden the Way: A Confucian-Jewish Dialogue. Lexington Books.
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  9. Galia Patt-Shamir (2005). Way as Dao; Way as Halakha: Confucianism, Judaism, and Way Metaphors. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):137-158.
  10. Galia Patt-shamir (2005). The Effectiveness of Contradiction for Understanding Human Practice: A Rhetoric of "Goal-Ideal" in Confucianism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (3):455–476.
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  11. Galia Patt-Shamir (2004). Moral World, Ethical Terminology: The Moral Significance of Metaphysical Terms in Zhou Dunyi and Zhu XI. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):349–362.
  12. Galia Patt-Shamir (2003). To Live a Riddle: The Case of the Binding of Isaac. Philosophy and Literature 27 (2):269-283.
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