Search results for 'Gareth J. Barker' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  15
    Siobhan M. Leary, Charles A. Davie, Geoff J. M. Parker, Valerie L. Stevenson, Liqun Wang, Gareth J. Barker, David H. Miller & A. J. Thompson (1999). 1 H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Normal Appearing White Matter in Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis. Journal of Neurology 246 (11).
    Recent magnetic resonance imaging and pathological studies have indicated that axonal loss is a major contributor to disease progression in multiple sclerosis. 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, through measurement of N -acetyl aspartate, a neuronal marker, provides a unique tool to investigate this. Patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis have few lesions on conventional MRI, suggesting that changes in normal appearing white matter, such as axonal loss, may be particularly relevant to disease progression in this group. To test this hypothesis (...)
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  2.  2
    Peter Barker (1994). Reconstructing Scientific Revolutions: Thomas S. Kuhn's Philosophy of Science by Paul Hoyningen-Huene; Alexander J. Levine. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 85:193-195.
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  3.  2
    Eileen Barker (1983). James J Preston Mother Worship: Theme and Variations. Pp. Xxiv+360. £16.80. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 19 (4):560.
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  4.  2
    Ernest Barker (1909). Book Review:The Schools of Hellas. Kenneth J. Freeman. [REVIEW] Ethics 19 (2):243-.
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  5.  2
    Peter Barker (1999). The Word of God and the Languages of Man: Interpreting Nature in Early Modern Science and Medicine. Volume 1: Ficino to Descartes by James J. Bono. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 90:117-117.
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  6.  1
    E. Barker (1910). Book Review:Six Radical Thinkers. J. MacCunn. [REVIEW] Ethics 20 (2):220-.
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  7.  5
    E. Barker (1985). Book Reviews : Interpreting Religious Phenomena: Studies with Reference to the Phenomenology of Religion. By Olaff Pettersson and Hans Akerberg. Stockholm: Almqvist and Wiksell, and Atlantic Highlands, N.J.: Humanities Press Inc., 1981. Pp. 201. $25.00 (Paper. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 15 (1):88-89.
  8.  5
    Elton Barker (2007). Literature (C.J.) Dewald Thucydides' War Narrative. A Structural Study. Berkeley: U. Of California P., 2005. Pp. Xiv + 258. £32.50. 9780520241275. (E.) Greenwood Thucydides and the Shaping of History. (Classical Literature and Society). London: Duckworth, 2006. Pp. Xi + 188, Maps. £16.99. 9780715632833. (P.) Zagorin Thucydides. An Introduction for the Common Reader. Princeton UP, 2005. Pp. Xiii + 190. £15.95. 9780691123516. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:165-.
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  9.  1
    Elton Barker (2007). Literature (J.M.) Foley Ed. A Companion to Ancient Epic. Malden, MA and Oxford: Blackwell, 2005. Pp. Xxv + 664, Illus. £85. 9781405105248. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:155-.
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  10. H. Barker (1898). BALDWIN, J. M. -Social and Ethical Interpretations in Mental Development. Mind 7:435.
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  11. Andrew Barker (1985). KIRK, G. S., RAVEN, J. E. And SCHOFIELD, M.: "The Presocratic Philosophers". Second Edition. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36:465.
     
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  12. H. Barker (1931). MUIRHEAD, J. H. - The Platonic Tradition in Anglo-Saxon Philosophy. [REVIEW] Mind 40:483.
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  13. H. Barker (1929). MACKENZIE, J. S. - Fundamental Problems of Life. [REVIEW] Mind 38:231.
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  14. H. Barker (1928). PATON, H. J. - The Good Will. [REVIEW] Mind 37:489.
     
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  15. H. Barker (1948). PATON, H. J. - The Categorical Imperative: A Study in Kant's Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Mind 57:93.
  16. Peter Barker (1994). Reconstructing Scientific Revolutions: Thomas S. Kuhn's Philosophy of SciencePaul Hoyningen-Huene Alexander J. Levine. Isis 85 (1):193-195.
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  17. H. Barker (1925). SCOTT, J. W. -Kant on the Moral Life. [REVIEW] Mind 34:375.
     
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  18. E. Barker (1909). Six Radical Thinkers, by J. MacCunn. [REVIEW] Ethics 20:220.
     
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  19. Ernest Barker (1908). The Schools of Hellas, by Kenneth J. Freeman. [REVIEW] Ethics 19:243.
     
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  20. Ernest Barker (1909). The Schools of HellasKenneth J. Freeman. International Journal of Ethics 19 (2):243-245.
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  21. H. Barker (1927). WEBB, C. C. J. -Kant's Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW] Mind 36:373.
  22. H. Barker (1927). WARD, J. - Essays in Philosophy. [REVIEW] Mind 36:478.
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  23. S. F. Barker (1963). Book Review:Error and Deception in Science: Essays on Biological Aspects of Life Jean Rostand, A. J. Pomerans. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 30 (4):406-.
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  24.  46
    Stephen J. Barker (2004). Renewing Meaning: A Speech-Act Theoretic Approach. Clarendon Press.
    Stephen Barker presents his first, ambitious book in the philosophy of language, setting out a radical alternative to standard theories of meaning.
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  25.  4
    R. J. Hirst & S. F. Barker (1960). Induction and Hypothesis: A Study of the Logic of Confirmation. Philosophical Quarterly 10 (41):375.
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  26.  2
    C. J. Yoos ii & J. R. Barker (2008). Covenons! We Owe Our Store to the Company's Soul.. Journal of Human Values 14 (2):141-155.
    We argue that in contemporary business organizations, in which fundamental purpose is construed to be increased value—especially in ‘participative’ organizations, in which non–hierarchal interaction is the norm; and in ‘adaptive’ organizations, in which unpredictable change is the rule—a process of values covenanting will be much more valueable than just espoused values or even values covenants. We propose such a process model for organizational values covenanting and argue that such covenanting reflects an anthropomorphism of the human character development process, validated in (...)
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  27. Stephen J. Barker (2010). Cognitive Expressivism, Faultless Disagreement, and Absolute but Non-Objective Truth. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 110 (2pt2):183-199.
    I offer a new theory of faultless disagreement, according to which truth is absolute (non-relative) but can still be non-objective. What's relative is truth-aptness: a sentence like ‘Vegemite is tasty’ (V) can be truth-accessible and bivalent in one context but not in another. Within a context in which V fails to be bivalent, we can affirm that there is no issue of truth or falsity about V, still disputants, affirming and denying V, were not at fault, since, in their context (...)
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  28. H. Barker, F. C. S. Schiller, Stanley V. Keeling, A. C. Ewing, E. J. Thomas, Helen Knight & O. de Selincourt (1928). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 37 (146):239-251.
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  29. Robert A. Wilson, Matthew J. Barker & Ingo Brigandt (2007). When Traditional Essentialism Fails. Philosophical Topics 35 (1-2):189-215.
    Essentialism is widely regarded as a mistaken view of biological kinds, such as species. After recounting why (sections 2-3), we provide a brief survey of the chief responses to the “death of essentialism” in the philosophy of biology (section 4). We then develop one of these responses, the claim that biological kinds are homeostatic property clusters (sections 5-6) illustrating this view with several novel examples (section 7). Although this view was first expressed 20 years ago, and has received recent discussion (...)
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  30. H. Barker, F. C. S. Schiller, P. Leon, J. Loewenberg, T. E. Jessop, James Drever, T. E. & John Laird (1932). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 41 (162):242-269.
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  31. Stephen J. Barker & Mihaela Popa-Wyatt (2015). Irony and the Dogma of Force and Sense. Analysis 75 (1):9-16.
    Frege’s distinction between force and sense is a central pillar of modern thinking about meaning. This is the idea that a self-standing utterance of a sentence S can be divided into two components. One is the proposition P that S’s linguistic meaning and context associates with it. The other is S’s illocutionary force. The force/sense distinction is associated with another thesis, the embedding principle, that implies that the only content that embeds in compound sentences is propositional content. We argue that (...)
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  32.  30
    Robert A. Wilson & Matthew J. Barker, The Biological Notion of Individual. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Individuals are a prominent part of the biological world. Although biologists and philosophers of biology draw freely on the concept of an individual in articulating both widely accepted and more controversial claims, there has been little explicit work devoted to the biological notion of an individual itself. How should we think about biological individuals? What are the roles that biological individuals play in processes such as natural selection (are genes and groups also units of selection?), speciation (are species individuals?), and (...)
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  33. Matthew J. Barker (2013). Essentialism. In Byron Kaldis (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Social Sciences.
  34. Stephen J. Barker (2000). Is Value Content a Component of Conventional Implicature? Analysis 60 (267):268–279.
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  35. Stephen J. Barker (2007). Semantics Without the Distinction Between Sense and Force. In Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.), John Searle's Philosophy of Language: Force, Meaning, and Mind. Cambridge University Press
    At the heart of semantics in the 20th century is Frege’s distinction between sense and force. This is the idea that the content of a self-standing utterance of a sentence S can be divided into two components. One part, the sense, is the proposition that S’s linguistic meaning and context associates with it as its semantic interpretation. The second component is S’s illocutionary force. Illocutionary forces correspond to the three basic kinds of sentential speech acts: assertions, orders, and questions. Forces (...)
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  36. Matthew J. Barker & Robert A. Wilson (2010). Cohesion, Gene Flow, and the Nature of Species. Journal of Philosophy 107 (2):59-77.
    A far-reaching and influential view in evolutionary biology claims that species are cohesive units held together by gene flow. Biologists have recognized empirical problems facing this view; after sharpening the expression of the view, we present novel conceptual problems for it. At the heart of these problems is a distinction between two importantly different concepts of cohesion, what we call integrative and response cohesion. Acknowledging the distinction problematizes both the explanandum of species cohesion and the explanans of gene flow that (...)
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  37.  32
    Matthew J. Barker & Joel D. Velasco (2013). Deep Conventionalism About Evolutionary Groups. Philosophy of Science 80 (5):971-982.
    We argue for a new conventionalism about many kinds of evolutionary groups, including clades, cohesive units, and populations. This rejects a consensus, which says that given any one of the many legitimate grouping concepts, only objective biological facts determine whether a collection is such a group. Surprisingly, being any one kind of evolutionary group typically depends on which of many incompatible values are taken by suppressed variables. This is a novel pluralism underlying most any one group concept, rather than a (...)
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  38.  82
    Matthew J. Barker (2010). Specious intrinsicalism. Philosophy of Science 77 (1):73-91.
    Over the last 2,300 years or so, many philosophers have believed that species are individuated by essences that are at least in part intrinsic. Psychologists tell us most folks also believe this view. But most philosophers of biology have abandoned the view, in light of evolutionary conceptions of species. In defiance, Michael Devitt has attempted in this journal to resurrect a version of the view, which he calls Intrinsic Biological Essentialism. I show that his arguments for the resurrection fail, and (...)
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  39.  71
    J. H. S. & Ernest Barker (1919). Greek Political Theory: Plato and His Predecessors. Journal of Hellenic Studies 39 (1):238.
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  40.  40
    Darren Natale, Cecilia N. Arighi, Winona C. Barker, Judith A. Blake, Carol J. Bult, Michael Caudy, Harold J. Drabkin, Peter D’Eustachio, Alexei V. Evsikov, Hongzhan Huang, Jules Nchoutmboube, Natalia V. Roberts, Barry Smith, Jian Zhang & Cathy H. Wu (2011). The Protein Ontology: A Structured Representation of Protein Forms and Complexes. Nucleic Acids Research 39 (1):D539-D545.
    The Protein Ontology (PRO) provides a formal, logically-based classification of specific protein classes including structured representations of protein isoforms, variants and modified forms. Initially focused on proteins found in human, mouse and Escherichia coli, PRO now includes representations of protein complexes. The PRO Consortium works in concert with the developers of other biomedical ontologies and protein knowledge bases to provide the ability to formally organize and integrate representations of precise protein forms so as to enhance accessibility to results of protein (...)
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  41.  24
    Matthew J. Barker (2010). From Cognition's Location to the Epistemology of its Nature. Cognitive Systems Research 11 (357):366.
    One of the liveliest debates about cognition concerns whether our cognition sometimes extends beyond our brains and bodies. One party says Yes, another No. This paper shows that debate between these parties has been epistemologically confused and requires reorienting. Both parties frequently appeal to empirical considerations and to extra-empirical theoretical virtues to support claims about where cognition is. These things should constrain their claims, but cannot do all the work hoped. This is because of the overlooked fact, uncovered in this (...)
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  42. Stephen J. Barker, Global Expressivism.
    There is a wide-spread belief amongst theorists of mind and language. This is that in order to understand the relation between language, thought, and reality we need a theory of meaning and content, that is, a normative, formal science of meaning, which is an extension and theoretical deepening of folk ideas about meaning. This book argues that this is false, offering an alternative idea: The form of a theory that illuminates the relation of language, thought, and reality is a theory (...)
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  43. J. A. Barker & F. Adams (2010). Epistemic Closure and Skepticism. Logos and Episteme 1 (2):221-246.
     
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  44.  68
    Stephen J. Barker (1993). Conditional Excluded Middle, Conditional Assertion, and 'Only If'. Analysis 53 (4):254 - 261.
  45.  99
    Stephen J. Barker (1994). Causation, Facts and Coherence. Analysis 54 (3):179 - 182.
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  46.  14
    Mark J. Barker (2012). Aquinas on Internal Sensory Intentions. International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):199-226.
    This paper suggests several summa genera for the various meanings of intentio in Aquinas and briefly outlines the genera of cognitive intentiones. It presents the referential and existential nature of intentions of harm or usefulness as distinguished from external sensory or imaginary forms in light of Avicenna’s threefold sensory abstraction. The paper offers a terminological clarification regarding the quasi-immaterial existential status of intentions. Internal sensory intentions account for a way in which one perceives something, as is best seen in light (...)
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  47.  58
    Matthew J. Barker (2007). The Empirical Inadequacy of Species Cohesion by Gene Flow. Philosophy of Science 74 (5):654-665.
    This paper brings needed clarity to the influential view that species are cohesive entities held together by gene flow, and then develops an empirical argument against that view: Neglected data suggest gene flow is neither necessary nor sufficient for species cohesion. Implications are discussed. ‡I'm grateful to Rob Wilson, Alex Rueger and Lindley Darden for important comments on earlier drafts, and to Joseph Nagel, Heather Proctor, Ken Bond, members of the DC History and Philosophy of Biology reading group, and audience (...)
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  48.  82
    Stephen J. Barker (1998). Predetermination and Tense Probabilism. Analysis 58 (4):290–296.
  49.  36
    Matthew J. Barker (2013). Biological Explanations, Realism, Ontology, and Categories. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4):617-622.
  50.  76
    Philip J. Barker (2005). The Tidal Model: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals. Brunner-Routledge.
    The Tidal Model represents a significant alternative to mainstream mental health theories, emphasizing how those suffering from mental health problems can benefit from taking a more active role in their own treatment. Based on extensive research, The Tidal Model charts the development of this approach, outlining the theoretical basis of the model to illustrate the benefits of a holistic model of care which promotes self-management and recovery. Clinical examples are also employed to show how, by exploring rather than ignoring a (...)
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