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  1. Garland E. Allen (forthcoming). Thomas Hunt Morgan: Materialism and Experimentalism in the Development of Modern Genetics. Social Research.
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  2. Garland E. Allen (2013). “Culling the Herd”: Eugenics and the Conservation Movement in the United States, 1900–1940. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 46 (1):31-72.
    While from a late twentieth- and early twenty-first century perspective, the ideologies of eugenics (controlled reproduction to eliminate the genetically unfit and promote the reproduction of the genetically fit) and environmental conservation and preservation, may seem incompatible, they were promoted simultaneously by a number of figures in the progressive era in the decades between 1900 and 1950. Common to the two movements were the desire to preserve the “best” in both the germ plasm of the human population and natural environments (...)
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  3. Garland E. Allen (2013). On the History of the International Eugenics Movement. Metascience 22 (2):383-386.
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  4. Garland E. Allen (2008). Rebel With Two Causes: Hans Driesch. In Oren Harman & Michael Dietrich (eds.), Rebels, Mavericks, and Heretics in Biology. Yale University Press. 37.
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  5. Garland E. Allen (2005). Mechanism, Vitalism and Organicism in Late Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Biology: The Importance of Historical Context. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (2):261-283.
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  6. Garland E. Allen (2004). A Pact with the Embryo: Viktor Hamburger, Holistic and Mechanistic Philosophy in the Development of Neuroembryology, 1927-1955. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):421 - 475.
    Viktor Hamburger was a developmental biologist interested in the ontogenesis of the vertebrate nervous system. A student of Hans Spemann at Freiburg in the 1920s, Hamburger picked up a holistic view of the embryo that precluded him from treating it in a reductionist way; at the same time, he was committed to a materialist and analytical approach that eschewed any form of vitalism or metaphysics. This paper explores how Hamburger walked this thin line between mechanistic reductionism and metaphysical vitalism in (...)
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  7. Garland E. Allen (2004). Mendelian Genetics. Ludus Vitalis 12 (21):213-236.
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  8. Garland E. Allen (2002). The Unfit: History of a Bad Idea. (2001) Elof A. Carlson, New York: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press. Bioessays 24 (8):765-766.
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  9. Viktor Hamburger, Garland E. Allen, Jane Maienschein & Hans Spemann (1999). Hans Spemann on Vitalism in Biology: Translation of a Portion of Spemann's "Autobiography". [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):231 - 243.
  10. Garland E. Allen (1997). The Double-Edged Sword of Genetic Determinism: Social and Political Agendas in Genetic Studies of Homosexuality, 1940–1994. [REVIEW] In Vernon A. Rosario (ed.), Science and Homosexualities. Routledge. 242--270.
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  11. Garland E. Allen (1996). Science As Moral Economy. [REVIEW] History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 18 (1):129 - 134.
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  12. Andrew Futterman & Garland E. Allen (1995). “Just So” Stories and Sociopathy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):557-558.
    Sociobiological explanation requires both a reliable and a valid definition of the sociopathy phenotype. Mealey assumes that such reliable and valid definition of sociopathy exists in her A review of psychiatric literature on the diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder clearly demonstrates that this assumption is faulty. There is substantial disagreement among diagnostic systems (e.g., RDC, DSM-III) over what constitutes the antisocial phenotype, different systems identify different individuals as sociopathic. Without a valid definition of sociopathy, sociobiological theories like Mealey's should be (...)
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  13. Gregg Mitman, Garland E. Allen, Joseph Cain, Nancy G. Slack, Keith R. Benson, Lily E. Kay & Alix Cooper (1994). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 27 (2):359-373.
  14. Garland E. Allen (1993). Inducers and 'Organizers': Hans Spemann and Experimental Embryology. [REVIEW] History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 15 (2):229 - 236.
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  15. Garland E. Allen, V. B. Smocovitis, Ronald Rainger, Lynn K. Nyhart, Keith R. Benson, Peter G. Sobol & Angela Creager (1993). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 26 (1):147-163.
  16. Garland E. Allen (1991). Reply to Lansanna Keita on “Marxism and Human Sociobiology”. Biology and Philosophy 6 (4):453-456.
  17. Garland E. Allen (1987). Materialism and Reductionism in the Study of Animal Consciousness. In G. Greenberg & E. Tobach (eds.), Cognition, Language, and Consciousness: Integrative Levels. Lawrence Erlbaum. 137--160.
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  18. Andrew Futterman & Garland E. Allen (1987). Putting Sociobiology in its Place. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (1):76.
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  19. Garland E. Allen (1984). Review: The Roots of Biological Determinism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 17 (1):141 - 145.
  20. Garland E. Allen (1983). The Misuse of Biological Hierarchies: The American Eugenics Movement, 1900-1940. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 5 (2):105 - 128.
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  21. Garland E. Allen (1982). Nineteenth Century Biology Studies in History of Biology 4 William Coleman Camille Limogas. BioScience 32 (4):282-282.
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  22. Garland E. Allen (1981). Morphology and Twentieth-Century Biology: A Response. Journal of the History of Biology 14 (1):159 - 176.
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  23. Garland E. Allen (1974). Introduction. Journal of the History of Biology 7 (1):1-3.
  24. Garland E. Allen (1974). Opposition to the Mendelian-Chromosome Theory: The Physiological and Developmental Genetics of Richard Goldschmidt. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 7 (1):49 - 92.
    We may now ask the question: In what historical perspective should we place the work of Richard Goldschmidt? There is no doubt that in the period 1910–1950 Goldschmidt was an important and prolific figure in the history of biology in general, and of genetics in particular. His textbook on physiological genetics, published in 1938, was an amazing compendium of ideas put forward in the previous half-century about how genes influence physiology and development. His earlier studies on the genetic and geographic (...)
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  25. Garland E. Allen (1969). Hugo De Vries and the Reception of the "Mutation Theory". Journal of the History of Biology 2 (1):55 - 87.
    De Vries' mutation theory has not stood the test of time. The supposed mutations of Oenothera were in reality complex recombination phenomena, ultimately explicable in Mendelian terms, while instances of large-scale mutations were found wanting in other species. By 1915 the mutation theory had begun to lose its grip on the biological community; by de Vries' death in 1935 it was almost completely abandoned. Yet, as we have seen, during the first decade of the present century it achieved an enormous (...)
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  26. Everett Mendelsohn, Dudley Shapere & Garland E. Allen (1969). Editors' Foreword. Journal of the History of Biology 2 (1):v-vi.
  27. Garland E. Allen (1968). Thomas Hunt Morgan and the Problem of Natural Selection. Journal of the History of Biology 1 (1):113 - 139.
  28. Garland E. Allen & Dennis M. McCullough (1968). Notes on Source Materials: The Edwin Grant Conklin Papers at Princeton University. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 1 (2):325 - 331.
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  29. Garland E. Allen (1966). A Model for the Emergence of Biochemical Novelties. BioScience 16 (5):325-331.
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