8 found
Sort by:
  1. Gary L. Brase & James Shanteau (2011). The Unbearable Lightness of “Thinking”: Moving Beyond Simple Concepts of Thinking, Rationality, and Hypothesis Testing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (5):250-251.
    Three correctives can get researchers out of the trap of constructing unitary theories of : (1) Strong inference methods largely avoid problems associated with universal prescriptive normativism; (2) theories must recognize that significant modularity of cognitive processes is antithetical to general accounts of thinking; and (3) consideration of the domain-specificity of rationality render many of the present article's issues moot.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Gary L. Brase (2007). Omissions, Conflations, and False Dichotomies: Conceptual and Empirical Problems with the Barbey & Sloman Account. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):258-259.
    Both the theoretical frameworks that organize the first part of Barbey & Sloman's (B&S's) target article and the empirical evidence marshaled in the second part are marked by distinctions that should not exist (i.e., false dichotomies), conflations where distinctions should be made, and selective omissions of empirical results that create illusions of theoretical and empirical favor.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Antonino Raffone & Gary L. Brase (2006). The Key Role of Prefrontal Cortex Structure and Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (1):22-22.
    The tension between focusing on species similarities versus species differences (phylogenetic versus adaptationist approaches) recurs in discussions about the nature of neural connectivity and organization following brain expansion. Whereas Striedter suggests a primary role for response inhibition, other possibilities include dense recurrent connectivity loops. Computer simulations and brain imaging technologies are crucial in better understanding actual neuronal connectivity patterns.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Gary L. Brase (2004). Functional Clothes for the Emperor. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):328-329.
    A more complete and balanced theoretical framework for social psychology, as recommended in the target article, must include functional explanations of processes – moving beyond enumerations of processes and their properties. These functional explanations are at a different, but complementary, level from process descriptions. The further advancement of social psychology relies on the incorporation of such multilevel explanations.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Gary L. Brase & Gary Walker (2004). Male Sexual Strategies Modify Ratings of Female Models with Specific Waist-to-Hip Ratios. Human Nature 15 (2):209-224.
    Female waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) has generally been an important general predictor of ratings of physical attractiveness and related characteristics. Individual differences in ratings do exist, however, and may be related to differences in the reproductive tactics of the male raters such as pursuit of short-term or long-term relationships and adjustments based on perceptions of one’s own quality as a mate. Forty males, categorized according to sociosexual orientation and physical qualities (WHR, Body Mass Index, and self-rated desirability), rated female models on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Gary L. Brase (2002). Boot Camp for the Brain. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (9):402.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Gary L. Brase (2002). There is No Evidentiary Silver Bullet for the Frequency Adaptation Hypothesis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):508-509.
    Special design criteria are largely unable to discriminate between claims that specific competencies in judgements under uncertainty are a result of an adaptation for representing naturally sampled frequencies, or due only to inherent properties of such a format. Because divisions between these perspectives are thin, evidence via additional criteria are persuasive only in combination, using inference to the best available explanation.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Gary L. Brase (2001). Markers of Social Group Membership as Probabilistic Cues in Reasoning Tasks. Thinking and Reasoning 7 (4):313 – 346.
    Reasoning about social groups and their associated markers was investigated as a particular case of human reasoning about cue-category relationships. Assertions that reasoning involving cues (group markers) and associated categories (social groups) elicits specific probabilistic assumptions are supported by the results of three experiments. This phenomenon remains intact across the use of categorical syllogisms (Experiment 1), conditional syllogisms (Experiment 2), and the use of social groups that vary in their perceived cohesiveness, or entitativity (Experiment 3). Implications are discussed for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation