Search results for 'Gender-neutral language' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Pauline Kleingeld (1993). The Problematic Status of Gender-Neutral Language in the History of Philosophy: The Case of Kant. Philosophical Forum 25:134-150.score: 179.0
    The increasingly common use of inclusive language (e.g., "he or she") in representing past philosophers' views is often inappropriate. Using Immanuel Kant's work as an example, I compare his use of terms such as "human race" and "human being" with his views on women to show that his use of generic terms does not prove that he includes women. I then discuss three different approaches to this issue, found in recent Kant-literature, and show why each of them is insufficient. (...)
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  2. Annabelle Mooney (2006). When a Woman Needs to Be Seen, Heard and Written as a Woman: Rape, Law and an Argument Against Gender Neutral Language. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 19 (1):39-68.score: 90.0
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  3. Roberta Bivins (2000). Sex Cells: Gender and the Language of Bacterial Genetics. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 33 (1):113 - 139.score: 76.0
    Between 1946 and 1960, a new phenomenon emerged in the field of bacteriology. "Bacterial sex," as it was called, revolutionized the study of genetics, largely by making available a whole new class of cheap, fast-growing, and easily manipulated organisms. But what was "bacterial sex?" How could single-celled organisms have "sex" or even be sexually differentiated? The technical language used in the scientific press -- the public and inalienable face of 20th century science -- to describe this apparently neuter organism (...)
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  4. Matthias J. Scheutz & Kathleen M. Eberhard (2004). Effects of Morphosyntactic Gender Features in Bilingual Language Processing*,*. Cognitive Science 28 (4):559-588.score: 60.0
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  5. Brian D. Earp (2012). The Extinction of Masculine Generics. Journal for Communication and Culture 2 (1):4-19.score: 57.0
    In English, as in many other languages, male-gendered pronouns are sometimes used to refer not only to men, but to individuals whose gender is unknown or unspecified, to human beings in general (as in ―mankind‖) and sometimes even to females (as when the casual ―Hey guys‖ is spoken to a group of women). These so-called he/man or masculine generics have come under fire in recent decades for being sexist, even archaic, and positively harmful to women and girls; and advocates of (...)
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  6. Heiko Motschenbacher (2010). Language, Gender and Sexual Identity: Poststructuralist Perspectives. John Benjamins Pub. Co..score: 54.0
    chapter Introduction Poststructuralist perspectives on language, gender and sexual identity Since the inception of the field of language and gender in the, ...
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  7. Arthur M. Glenberg, Bryan J. Webster, Emily Mouilso, David Havas & Lisa M. Lindeman (2009). Gender, Emotion, and the Embodiment of Language Comprehension. Emotion Review 1 (2):151-161.score: 48.0
    Language comprehension requires a simulation that uses neural systems involved in perception, action, and emotion. A review of recent literature as well as new experiments support five predictions derived from this framework. 1. Being in an emotional state congruent with sentence content facilitates sentence comprehension. 2. Because women are more reactive to sad events and men are more reactive to angry events, women understand sentences about sad events with greater facility than men, and men understand sentences about angry events (...)
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  8. Kimberly Maslin (2013). The Gender‐Neutral Feminism of Hannah Arendt. Hypatia 28 (3):585-601.score: 45.0
    Though many have recently attempted either to locate Arendt within feminism or feminism within the great body of Arendt's work, these efforts have proven only modestly successful. Even a cursory examination of Arendt's work should suggest that these efforts would prove frustrating. None of her voluminous writings deal specifically with gender, though some of her work certainly deals with notable women. Her interest is not in gender as such, but in woman as assimilated Jew or woman as social and political (...)
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  9. Mutsumi Imai, Lennart Schalk, Henrik Saalbach & Hiroyuki Okada (2014). All Giraffes Have Female‐Specific Properties: Influence of Grammatical Gender on Deductive Reasoning About Sex‐Specific Properties in German Speakers. Cognitive Science 38 (3):514-536.score: 45.0
    Grammatical gender is independent of biological sex for the majority of animal names (e.g., any giraffe, be it male or female, is grammatically treated as feminine). However, there is apparent semantic motivation for grammatical gender classes, especially in mapping human terms to gender. This research investigated whether this motivation affects deductive inference in native German speakers. We compared German with Japanese speakers (a language without grammatical gender) when making inferences about sex-specific biological properties. We found that German speakers tended (...)
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  10. Theodora Eliza Vacarescu (2010). What's in a Name? Modest Considerations on the Situatedness of Language and Meaning. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (9):124-135.score: 45.0
    In this paper I tackle the relationship between language, knowledge and power. To this end, I try to give some reasons for the non-arbitrariness of some words, as well as for the non-arbitrariness of grammatical genders in Romance languages, especially Romanian and French. I focus on several specific linguistic structures and uses of particular words in these two languages. I particularly deal with the construction of a third grammatical gender, the neuter, in Romanian, in comparison to the two grammatical (...)
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  11. Evelyn Fox Keller (1992). Secrets of Life, Secrets of Death: Essays on Language, Gender, and Science. Routledge.score: 42.0
    The essays included here represent Fox Keller's attempts to integrate the insights of feminist theory with those of her contemporaries in the history and philosophy of science.
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  12. Laura Grattan (2008). Rewriting Canonical Discourses: The Political Subject of Gender-Neutral Freedom. Theory and Event 11 (3).score: 42.0
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  13. Elizabeth Mirrielees Hodge & Laura Duhan Kaplan (1999). Is Philosophy Gender-Neutral? The Philosophers' Magazine 7 (7):39-42.score: 42.0
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  14. Joanne Martin & Kathleen Knopoff (1997). The Gendered Implications of Apparently Gender-Neutral Theory. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:30-49.score: 42.0
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  15. María Bullón-Fernández (2013). Tara Williams, Inventing Womanhood: Gender and Language in Later Middle English Writing. (Interventions: New Studies in Medieval Culture.) Columbus: The Ohio State University Press, 2011. Pp. Viii, 209. $49.95. ISBN: 9780814211519. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (1):358-360.score: 42.0
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  16. Charles Card (2011). Form and Archetype: Anticipations of a Psychophysically Neutral Language. Mind and Matter 9 (1):53-88.score: 42.0
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  17. Root Gorelick (2012). Meiosis is Not Gender Neutral. Bioscience 62 (7):623-624.score: 42.0
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  18. Grzegorz A. Kleparski & Marta Pikor-Niedziałek (2011). Gender and Language. American Journal of Semiotics 27 (1/4):284 - 286.score: 42.0
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  19. Heidi Pauwels & Nirālā (forthcoming). Diptych in Verse: Gender Hybridity, Language Consciousness, and National Identity in Nirālā's" Jāgo Phir Ek Bār". Journal of the American Oriental Society.score: 42.0
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  20. Arseny A. Sokolov, Samuel Krüger, Paul Enck, Ingeborg Krägeloh-Mann & Marina A. Pavlova (2011). Gender Affects Body Language Reading. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 42.0
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  21. Sarah Stanbury (1999). Catherine S. Cox, Gender and Language in Chaucer. Gainesville, Fla.: University Press of Florida, 1997. Pp. Xi, 196. $49.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 74 (3):722-725.score: 42.0
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  22. Kitojo Wetengere (2011). Is the Adoption of Farm Technology Gender Neutral? The Case of Fish Farming Technology in Morogoro Region Tanzania. International Journal of Ethics 7 (1).score: 42.0
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  23. Joyce N. Davidson & Mick Smith (1999). Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language (Game) of Difference. Hypatia 14 (2):72-96.score: 39.0
    : Drawing Wittgenstein's and Irigaray's philosophies into conversation might help resolve certain misunderstandings that have so far hampered both the reception of Irigaray's work and the development of feminist praxis in general. A Wittgensteinian reading of Irigaray can furnish an anti-essentialist conception of "woman" that retains the theoretical and political specificity feminism requires while dispelling charges that Irigaray's attempt to delineate a "feminine" language is either groundlessly utopian or entails a biological essentialism.
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  24. Elizabeth M. Bucar, Grace Y. Kao & Irene Oh (2010). Sexing Comparative Ethics: Bringing Forth Feminist and Gendered Perspectives. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):654-659.score: 39.0
    This collaborative companion piece, written as a postscript to the three preceding essays, highlights four themes in comparative religious ethics that emerge through our focus on sex and gender: language, embodiment, justice, and critique.
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  25. Joyce Nira Davidson & Mick Smith (1999). Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language (Game) of Difference. Hypatia 14 (2):72 - 96.score: 39.0
    Drawing Wittgenstein's and Irigaray's philosophies into conversation might help resolve certain misunderstandings that have so far hampered both the reception of Irigaray's work and the development of feminist praxis in general. A Wittgensteinian reading of Irigaray can furnish an anti-essentialist conception of "woman" that retains the theoretical and political specificity feminism requires while dispelling charges that Irigaray's attempt to delineate a "feminine" language is either groundlessly utopian or entails a biological essentialism.
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  26. Rosalind M. O. Pritchard & Rafik Loulidi (1994). Some Attitudinal Aspects of Foreign Language Learning in Northern Ireland: Focus on Gender and Religious Affiliation. British Journal of Educational Studies 42 (4):388 - 401.score: 39.0
    This paper discusses some aspects of foreign language learning within the divided school system of Northern Ireland. It is argued that an improvement of foreign language learning must be seen in a sociocultural context whereby a change in attitudes to languages in general, including Irish, may lead not only to a balanced interest among girls and boys in the language classroom, but also to a more tolerant approach to the cultural differences among the Catholic and Protestant communities.
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  27. Alfred R. Mele & Piers Rawling (2004). Introduction: Aspects of Rationality. In Alfred R. Mele & Piers Rawling (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Rationality. Oxford University Press.score: 38.0
    This article examines the nature of rationality. The domain of rationality is customarily divided into the theoretical and the practical. Whereas theoretical or epistemic rationality is concerned with what it is rational to believe, and sometimes with rational degrees of belief, practical rationality is concerned with what it is rational to do, or intend or desire to do. This article raises some of the main issues relevant to philosophical discussion of the nature of rationality. Discussions of the nature of practical (...)
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  28. Edward Segel & Lera Boroditsky (2011). Grammar in Art. Frontiers in Psychology 1.score: 38.0
    Roman Jakobson (1959) reports: “The Russian painter Repin was baffled as to why Sin had been depicted as a woman by German artists: he did not realize that “sin” is feminine in German (die Sünde), but masculine in Russian (грех).” Does the grammatical gender of nouns in an artist’s native language indeed predict the gender of personifications in art? In this paper we analyzed works in the ARTstor database (a digital art library containing over a million images) to measure (...)
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  29. Deborah Cameron (2010). Gender, Language, and the New Biologism. Constellations 17 (4):526-539.score: 36.0
  30. Alireza Ahmadi (2012). Cheating on Exams in the Iranian EFL Context. Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (2):151-170.score: 36.0
    The present study aimed at investigating the status of cheating on exams in the Iranian EFL context. One hundred thirty two university students were surveyed to this end. They were selected through convenient sampling. The results indicated that cheating is quite common among the Iranian language students. The most important reasons for this behavior were found to be “not being ready for the exam”, “difficulty of the exam”, “lack of time to study” and “careless and lenient instructors”. The study (...)
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  31. Robert C. Powell & Julia D. Batters (1985). Pupils' Perceptions of Foreign Language Learning at 12+: Some Gender Differences. Educational Studies 11 (1):11-23.score: 36.0
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  32. Lisa Barnett (1995). Edmund Burke's Aesthetic Ideology: Language, Gender, and Political Economy in Revolution. History of European Ideas 21 (2):321-322.score: 36.0
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  33. David Bleich (2013). The Materiality of Language: Gender, Politics, and the University. Indiana University Press.score: 36.0
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  34. Susan Butler & Robyn Fivush (1995). Mother-Child Talk About Past Emotions: Relations of Maternal Language and Child Gender Over Time Janet Kuebli Saint Louis University, St. Louis, USA. Cognition and Emotion 9 (1-3):265-283.score: 36.0
  35. Iulia Grad (2010). Words and Women. An Eligible Bachelor Vs. An Eligible Spinster. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (14):95-101.score: 36.0
    The subject of gender discrimination in language and the relation between language and social structures is well known and widely debated. Nevertheless, everyday experiences show, over and over, the linguistic hierarchy at work when men and women are concerned. This paper has two main parts. The first one concerns the image of women in language and the other one treats the manner in which women usually use the language. Despite the fact that these social unwritten rules (...)
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  36. Janet Kuebli, Susan Butler & Robyn Fivush (1995). Mother-Child Talk About Past Emotions: Relations of Maternal Language and Child Gender Over Time. Cognition and Emotion 9 (2-3):265-283.score: 36.0
  37. Richard O'Kearney & Mark Dadds (2004). Developmental and Gender Differences in the Language for Emotions Across the Adolescent Years. Cognition and Emotion 18 (7):913-938.score: 36.0
  38. Pierre W. Orelus (2011). Rethinking Race, Class, Language, and Gender: A Dialogue with Noam Chomsky and Other Leading Scholars. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 36.0
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  39. Holt Parker (2007). Stevenson (J.) Women Latin Poets: Language, Gender and Authority From Antiquity to the Eighteenth Century. Pp. Xiv + 659. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. Cased, £85. ISBN: 978-0-19-818502-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (02).score: 36.0
  40. Eugene F. Rogers (2009). The Kindness of God: Metaphor, Gender, and Religious Language – By Janet Martin Soskice. Modern Theology 25 (3):519-521.score: 36.0
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  41. Eva Stehle (2009). Weaving Truth: Essays on Language and the Female in Greek Thought, And: The Feminine Matrix of Sex and Gender in Classical Athens (Review). American Journal of Philology 130 (4):635-640.score: 36.0
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  42. Bozena Tieszen & Heather Pantoga (2006). Gender-Based Miscommunication in Legal Discourse and its Impact on the Clarity of Legal Language. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 19 (1):69-80.score: 36.0
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  43. Agnes Verbiest (1995). Woman and the Gift of Reason. Argumentation 9 (5):821-836.score: 36.0
    An incidental extension of the central domain of argumentation theory with non-classical ways of constructing arguments seems to automatically raise a question that is otherwise rarely posed, namely whether or not it is useful to consider the sex of the arguer. This question is usually posed with regard to argumentation by women in particular. Do women rely more, or differently than men do on non-canonical modes of reasoning stemming from the realm of the emotional, physical and intuitive, instead of the (...)
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  44. Greensboro Voice (2012). Patty Sotirin is a Professor of Communication at Michigan Technological University. Her Published Work Focuses on Gender, Resistance, and Feminist Critique. She is Editor of Women & Language and has Coauthored (with Laura Ellingson) a Study on Aunt/Niece/Nephew Communication, Flaunting: Communicative Practices That Sustain Family and Community Life (Baylor Press). She has Published Numerous Articles and Book Chapters. [REVIEW] In Elizabeth A. Flynn, Patricia J. Sotirin & Ann P. Brady (eds.), Feminist Rhetorical Resilience. Utah State University Press. 250.score: 36.0
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  45. Jane Bradley Winston (2005). Foreign Bodies: Gender, Language, and Culture in French Orientalism (Review). Substance 34 (1):189-193.score: 36.0
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  46. Philip N. S. Rumney (2008). Gender Neutrality, Rape and Trial Talk. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 21 (2):139-155.score: 34.0
    This article examines the notion of gender neutrality in rape, its meaning and why rape definitions that include females and males as potential victims of rape have become influential in those jurisdictions that have engaged in significant levels of rape law reform over the last four decades. In so doing, several of Annabelle Mooney’s criticisms of gender neutral rape laws, published in an earlier article, will be critically examined. The second part of this article draws on themes that have been (...)
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  47. Sara Salih (2002). Judith Butler. Routledge.score: 31.0
    A welcome addition to the Routledge Critical Thinkers series, Judith Butler is the first guidebook on this renowned feminist and queer theory scholar, which will help not only students of literary criticism but also students of law, sociology, philosophy, film and cultural studies. Examining Butler's work through a variety of contexts, including the formation of gender performativity, identity and subjecthood, Sarah Salih address Butler's crucial ideas on the gender agenda, the body, pornography, race, gay self-expression and power and psychoanalysis. Concluding (...)
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  48. Anne Donchin (2009). Toward a Gender-Sensitive Assisted Reproduction Policy. Bioethics 23 (1):28-38.score: 29.0
    The recent case of the UK woman who lost her legal struggle to be impregnated with her own frozen embryos, raises critical issues about the meaning of reproductive autonomy and the scope of regulatory practices. I revisit this case within the context of contemporary debate about the moral and legal dimensions of assisted reproduction. I argue that the gender neutral context that frames discussion of regulatory practices is unjust unless it gives appropriate consideration to the different positions women and men (...)
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  49. Androniki Panteli, Janet Stack & Harvie Ramsay (1999). Gender and Professional Ethics in the IT Industry. Journal of Business Ethics 22 (1):51 - 61.score: 29.0
    In this paper, we discuss the ethical responsibility of the Information Technology (IT) industry towards its female workforce. Although the growing IT industry experiences skills shortages, there is a declining trend in the representation of women. The paper presents evidence that the IT industry is not gender-neutral and that it does little to promote or retain its female workforce. We urge that professional codes of ethics in IT should be revised to take into account the diverse needs of its (...)
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  50. Evelyn Fox Keller & Helen E. Longino (eds.) (1996). Feminism and Science. Oxford University Press.score: 29.0
    (Series copy) The new Oxford Readings in Feminism series maps the dramatic influence of feminist theory on every branch of academic knowledge. Offering feminist perspectives on disciplines from history to science, each book assembles the most important articles written on its field in the last ten to fifteen years. Old stereotypes are challenged and traditional attitudes upset in these lively-- and sometimes controversial--volumes, all of which are edited by feminists prominent in their particular field. Comprehensive, accessible, and intellectually daring, the (...)
     
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