Search results for 'Gender-neutral language' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Pauline Kleingeld (1993). The Problematic Status of Gender-Neutral Language in the History of Philosophy: The Case of Kant. Philosophical Forum 25:134-150.
    The increasingly common use of inclusive language (e.g., "he or she") in representing past philosophers' views is often inappropriate. Using Immanuel Kant's work as an example, I compare his use of terms such as "human race" and "human being" with his views on women to show that his use of generic terms does not prove that he includes women. I then discuss three different approaches to this issue, found in recent Kant-literature, and show why each of them is insufficient. (...)
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  2. Marie Gustafsson Sendén, Emma A. Bäck & Anna Lindqvist (2015). Introducing a Gender-Neutral Pronoun in a Natural Gender Language: The Influence of Time on Attitudes and Behavior. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  3.  4
    Annabelle Mooney (2006). When a Woman Needs to Be Seen, Heard and Written as a Woman: Rape, Law and an Argument Against Gender Neutral Language. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 19 (1):39-68.
  4. Yvanka B. Raynova (2015). Human Rights, Women's Rights, Gender Mainstreaming, and Diversity: The Language Question. In Community, Praxis, and Values in a Postmetaphysical Age: Studies on Exclusion and Social Integration in Feminist Theory and Contemporary Philosophy. Axia Academic Publishers 38-89.
    In the following study the author goes back to the beginnings of the Women's Rights movements in order to pose the question on gender equality by approaching it through the prism of language as a powerful tool in human rights battles. This permits her to show the deep interrelation between women's struggle for recognition and some particular women rights, like the "feminization" of professional titles and the implementation of a gender sensitive language. Hence she argues the thesis that (...)
     
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  5.  14
    Roberta Bivins (2000). Sex Cells: Gender and the Language of Bacterial Genetics. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 33 (1):113 - 139.
    Between 1946 and 1960, a new phenomenon emerged in the field of bacteriology. "Bacterial sex," as it was called, revolutionized the study of genetics, largely by making available a whole new class of cheap, fast-growing, and easily manipulated organisms. But what was "bacterial sex?" How could single-celled organisms have "sex" or even be sexually differentiated? The technical language used in the scientific press -- the public and inalienable face of 20th century science -- to describe this apparently neuter organism (...)
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  6. Brian D. Earp (2012). The Extinction of Masculine Generics. Journal for Communication and Culture 2 (1):4-19.
    In English, as in many other languages, male-gendered pronouns are sometimes used to refer not only to men, but to individuals whose gender is unknown or unspecified, to human beings in general (as in ―mankind‖) and sometimes even to females (as when the casual ―Hey guys‖ is spoken to a group of women). These so-called he/man or masculine generics have come under fire in recent decades for being sexist, even archaic, and positively harmful to women and girls; and advocates of (...)
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  7.  7
    Charles Card (2011). Form and Archetype: Anticipations of a Psychophysically Neutral Language. Mind and Matter 9 (1):53-88.
    The defining characteristics anticipated for any prospective psychophysically neutral language are explored in this essay through the analysis and comparison of two previous approaches. The idea of a psychophysically neutral language was first articulated byWolfgang Pauli in the context of the dual-aspect theory of mind and matter that he developed with C.G. Jung. The first approach discussed is George Spencer Brown's Laws of Form. An overview is given, followed by a review of the critical responses and extensions of (...)
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  8.  2
    Matthias J. Scheutz & Kathleen M. Eberhard (2004). Effects of Morphosyntactic Gender Features in Bilingual Language Processing*,*. Cognitive Science 28 (4):559-588.
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  9.  1
    Kitojo Wetengere (2011). Is the Adoption of Farm Technology Gender Neutral? The Case of Fish Farming Technology in Morogoro Region Tanzania. International Journal of Ethics 7 (1):19-24.
    This chapter is a product of a study undertaken to investigate the influence of gender related factors as regards to adoption of fish farming technology in selected villages of Morogoro Region, Tanzania. Data for this chapter had been collected in various studies conducted earlier and results published by the author about the study area from November 2005 to May 2008. These data were supplemented by primary data which had been collected by the author but not used before, and secondary information (...)
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  10. Oritsegbubemi Oyowe & Olga Yurkivska (2014). Can a Communitarian Concept of African Personhood Be Both Relational and Gender-Neutral? South African Journal of Philosophy 33 (1):85-99.
    This paper explores the relationship between the African communitarian conception of personhood and gender. Defenders of this conception of personhood generally hold that an individual is defined in reference to the community, or that personhood is something that is acquired in community. Such characterisations often ignore the role, if any, that gender plays in that conception of personhood. Our aim in this paper is to critically explore the relationship between the two. In doing this we advance a number of claims. (...)
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  11.  22
    Heiko Motschenbacher (2010). Language, Gender and Sexual Identity: Poststructuralist Perspectives. John Benjamins Pub. Co..
    chapter Introduction Poststructuralist perspectives on language, gender and sexual identity Since the inception of the field of language and gender in the, ...
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  12. Magdalena M. Formanowicz, Aleksandra Cisłak, Lisa K. Horvath & Sabine Sczesny (2015). Capturing Socially Motivated Linguistic Change: How the Use of Gender-Fair Language Affects Support for Social Initiatives in Austria and Poland. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  13. Dries Vervecken, Pascal M. Gygax, Ute Gabriel, Matthias Guillod & Bettina Hannover (2015). Warm-Hearted Businessmen, Competitive Housewives? Effects of Gender-Fair Language on Adolescents’ Perceptions of Occupations. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  14. David Bleich (2013). The Materiality of Language: Gender, Politics, and the University. Indiana University Press.
    David Bleich sees the human body, its affective life, social life, and political functions as belonging to the study of language. In The Materiality of Language, Bleich addresses the need to end centuries of limiting access to language and its many contexts of use. To recognize language as material and treat it as such, argues Bleich, is to remove restrictions to language access due to historic patterns of academic censorship and unfair gender practices. Language (...)
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  15. David Bleich (2013). The Materiality of Language: Gender, Politics, and the University. Indiana University Press.
    David Bleich sees the human body, its affective life, social life, and political functions as belonging to the study of language. In The Materiality of Language, Bleich addresses the need to end centuries of limiting access to language and its many contexts of use. To recognize language as material and treat it as such, argues Bleich, is to remove restrictions to language access due to historic patterns of academic censorship and unfair gender practices. Language (...)
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  16. David Bleich (2013). The Materiality of Language: Gender, Politics, and the University. Indiana University Press.
    David Bleich sees the human body, its affective life, social life, and political functions as belonging to the study of language. In The Materiality of Language, Bleich addresses the need to end centuries of limiting access to language and its many contexts of use. To recognize language as material and treat it as such, argues Bleich, is to remove restrictions to language access due to historic patterns of academic censorship and unfair gender practices. Language (...)
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  17.  25
    Kimberly Maslin (2013). The Gender‐Neutral Feminism of Hannah Arendt. Hypatia 28 (3):585-601.
    Though many have recently attempted either to locate Arendt within feminism or feminism within the great body of Arendt's work, these efforts have proven only modestly successful. Even a cursory examination of Arendt's work should suggest that these efforts would prove frustrating. None of her voluminous writings deal specifically with gender, though some of her work certainly deals with notable women. Her interest is not in gender as such, but in woman as assimilated Jew or woman as social and political (...)
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  18. Sabine Sczesny, Magda Formanowicz & Franziska Moser (2016). Can Gender-Fair Language Reduce Gender Stereotyping and Discrimination? Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  19.  12
    Arthur M. Glenberg, Bryan J. Webster, Emily Mouilso, David Havas & Lisa M. Lindeman (2009). Gender, Emotion, and the Embodiment of Language Comprehension. Emotion Review 1 (2):151-161.
    Language comprehension requires a simulation that uses neural systems involved in perception, action, and emotion. A review of recent literature as well as new experiments support five predictions derived from this framework. 1. Being in an emotional state congruent with sentence content facilitates sentence comprehension. 2. Because women are more reactive to sad events and men are more reactive to angry events, women understand sentences about sad events with greater facility than men, and men understand sentences about angry events (...)
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  20.  26
    Elizabeth Mirrielees Hodge & Laura Duhan Kaplan (1999). Is Philosophy Gender-Neutral? The Philosophers' Magazine 7 (7):39-42.
  21.  11
    Laura Grattan (2008). Rewriting Canonical Discourses: The Political Subject of Gender-Neutral Freedom. Theory and Event 11 (3).
  22.  15
    Joanne Martin & Kathleen Knopoff (1997). The Gendered Implications of Apparently Gender-Neutral Theory. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:30-49.
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  23.  4
    Grzegorz A. Kleparski & Marta Pikor-Niedziałek (2011). Gender and Language. American Journal of Semiotics 27 (1/4):284 - 286.
  24.  4
    Heidi Pauwels & Nirala (2001). Diptych in Verse: Gender Hybridity, Language Consciousness, and National Identity in Nirālā's "Jāgo Phir Ek Bār". Journal of the American Oriental Society 121 (3):449-481.
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  25.  1
    María Bullón-Fernández (2013). Tara Williams, Inventing Womanhood: Gender and Language in Later Middle English Writing. (Interventions: New Studies in Medieval Culture.) Columbus: The Ohio State University Press, 2011. Pp. Viii, 209. $49.95. ISBN: 9780814211519. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (1):358-360.
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  26.  2
    Sarah Stanbury (1999). Catherine S. Cox, Gender and Language in Chaucer. Gainesville, Fla.: University Press of Florida, 1997. Pp. Xi, 196. $49.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 74 (3):722-725.
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  27. Karolina Hansen, Cindy Littwitz & Sabine Sczesny (2016). The Social Perception of Heroes and Murderers: Effects of Gender-Inclusive Language in Media Reports. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  28. Lisa K. Horvath, Elisa F. Merkel, Anne Maass & Sabine Sczesny (2016). Does Gender-Fair Language Pay Off? The Social Perception of Professions From a Cross-Linguistic Perspective. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  29. Sarah Stanbury (1999). Gender and Language in Chaucer.Catherine S. Cox. Speculum 74 (3):722-725.
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  30.  37
    Evelyn Fox Keller (1992). Secrets of Life, Secrets of Death: Essays on Language, Gender, and Science. Routledge.
    The essays included here represent Fox Keller's attempts to integrate the insights of feminist theory with those of her contemporaries in the history and philosophy of science.
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  31. Jane Bradley Winston (2005). Foreign Bodies: Gender, Language, and Culture in French Orientalism (Review). Substance 34 (1):189-193.
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  32.  43
    Joyce N. Davidson & Mick Smith (1999). Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language (Game) of Difference. Hypatia 14 (2):72-96.
    : Drawing Wittgenstein's and Irigaray's philosophies into conversation might help resolve certain misunderstandings that have so far hampered both the reception of Irigaray's work and the development of feminist praxis in general. A Wittgensteinian reading of Irigaray can furnish an anti-essentialist conception of "woman" that retains the theoretical and political specificity feminism requires while dispelling charges that Irigaray's attempt to delineate a "feminine" language is either groundlessly utopian or entails a biological essentialism.
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  33.  16
    Joyce Nira Davidson & Mick Smith (1999). Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language (Game) of Difference. Hypatia 14 (2):72 - 96.
    Drawing Wittgenstein's and Irigaray's philosophies into conversation might help resolve certain misunderstandings that have so far hampered both the reception of Irigaray's work and the development of feminist praxis in general. A Wittgensteinian reading of Irigaray can furnish an anti-essentialist conception of "woman" that retains the theoretical and political specificity feminism requires while dispelling charges that Irigaray's attempt to delineate a "feminine" language is either groundlessly utopian or entails a biological essentialism.
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  34.  1
    Eva Stehle (2009). Weaving Truth: Essays on Language and the Female in Greek Thought, And: The Feminine Matrix of Sex and Gender in Classical Athens (Review). American Journal of Philology 130 (4):635-640.
    The common theme linking these two books is the ideology of gender, specifically the positioning of the "female" in ancient Greece. Because each author locates herself in a particular scholarly paradigm , they make a fascinating illustration of contrasts and continuities in the field of gender studies in classics.
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  35.  89
    Deborah Cameron (2010). Gender, Language, and the New Biologism. Constellations 17 (4):526-539.
  36.  9
    Sieghard Beller, Karen Fadnes Brattebø, Kristina Osland Lavik, Rakel Drønen Reigstad & Andrea Bender (2015). Culture or Language: What Drives Effects of Grammatical Gender? Cognitive Linguistics 26 (2):331-359.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Cognitive Linguistics Jahrgang: 26 Heft: 2 Seiten: 331-359.
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  37.  3
    Janet Kuebli, Susan Butler & Robyn Fivush (1995). Mother-Child Talk About Past Emotions: Relations of Maternal Language and Child Gender Over Time. Cognition and Emotion 9 (2-3):265-283.
  38. Clare Walsh (2001). Gender and Discourse Language and Power in Politics, the Church and Organisations. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  39. Maria D. Sera, Chryle Elieff, James Forbes, Melissa Clark Burch, Wanda Rodríguez & Diane Poulin Dubois (2002). When Language Affects Cognition and When It Does Not: An Analysis of Grammatical Gender and Classification. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 131 (3):377-397.
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  40.  6
    Holt Parker (2007). Stevenson (J.) Women Latin Poets: Language, Gender and Authority From Antiquity to the Eighteenth Century. Pp. Xiv + 659. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. Cased, £85. ISBN: 978-0-19-818502-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (02):413-415.
  41. Gabriella Vigliocco, David P. Vinson, Federica Paganelli & Katharina Dworzynski (2005). Grammatical Gender Effects on Cognition: Implications for Language Learning and Language Use. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 134 (4):501-520.
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  42.  2
    Bozena Tieszen & Heather Pantoga (2006). Gender-Based Miscommunication in Legal Discourse and its Impact on the Clarity of Legal Language. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 19 (1):69-80.
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  43.  1
    Robert C. Powell & Julia D. Batters (1985). Pupils' Perceptions of Foreign Language Learning at 12+: Some Gender Differences. Educational Studies 11 (1):11-23.
  44.  1
    Richard O'Kearney & Mark Dadds (2004). Developmental and Gender Differences in the Language for Emotions Across the Adolescent Years. Cognition and Emotion 18 (7):913-938.
  45.  1
    Lisa Barnett (1995). Edmund Burke's Aesthetic Ideology: Language, Gender, and Political Economy in Revolution. History of European Ideas 21 (2):321-322.
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  46. Margaret Atkins (2010). The Kindness of God: Metaphor, Gender and Religious Language by Janet Martin Soskice. New Blackfriars 91 (1032):209-211.
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  47. Susan Butler & Robyn Fivush (1995). Mother-Child Talk About Past Emotions: Relations of Maternal Language and Child Gender Over Time Janet Kuebli Saint Louis University, St. Louis, USA. Cognition and Emotion 9 (1-3):265-283.
     
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  48. Paolo Canal, Alan Garnham & Jane Oakhill (2015). Beyond Gender Stereotypes in Language Comprehension: Self Sex-Role Descriptions Affect the Brain’s Potentials Associated with Agreement Processing. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  49. Joyce Davidson & Mick Smith (1999). Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language of Difference. Hypatia 14 (2):72-96.
  50. Alan Garnham, Jane Oakhill, Lisa Von Stockhausen & Sabine Sczesny (2016). Editorial: Language, Cognition, and Gender. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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