Search results for 'Gene E. Burton' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  5
    Gene E. Burton (1991). Doctors and Their Advertising. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 10 (2):31-48.
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  2. Gene E. Burton (1991). The Readability of Consumer-Oriented Bank Brochures: An Empirical Investigation. Business and Society 30 (1):21-25.
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  3.  1
    R. W. B. Burton & E. Della Valle (1955). L'Antigone di Sofocle. Introduzione saggio e versione poetica. Journal of Hellenic Studies 75:164.
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  4.  3
    N. Hallowell, S. Chowdhury, A. E. Hall, P. Pharoah, H. Burton & N. Pashayan (2014). What Ethical and Legal Principles Should Guide the Genotyping of Children as Part of a Personalised Screening Programme for Common Cancer? Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):163-167.
    Increased knowledge of the gene–disease associations contributing to common cancer development raises the prospect of population stratification by genotype and other risk factors. Individual risk assessments could be used to target interventions such as screening, treatment and health education. Genotyping neonates, infants or young children as part of a systematic programme would improve coverage and uptake, and facilitate a screening package that maximises potential benefits and minimises harms including overdiagnosis. This paper explores the potential justifications and risks of genotyping (...)
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  5.  15
    Diana Burton (2006). Greek Myth (E.) Csapo Theories of Mythology. Oxford: Blackwell, 2005. Pp. Xiii + 338. £17.99 (Pbk); 0631232486. £60 (Hbk), 0631232478. (C.) Calame Myth and History in Ancient Greece. The Symbolic Creation of a Colony. Princeton UP, 2003. Pp. Xvii + 178. £26.95. 0691114587. (S.M.) Trzaskoma, (R.S.) Smith and (S.) Brunet Anthology of Classical Myth. Primary Sources in Translation. Indianapolis: Hackett, 2004. Pp. Lvii + 517, Illus. £32 (Hbk), 0872207226; £11.95 (Pbk), 0872207218. (R.) Hard The Routledge Handbook of Greek Mythology. Based on H.J. Rose's Handbook of Greek Mythology. London: Routledge, 2004. Pp. Xx + 753, Illus. £125. 0415186366. (S.) Price and (E) Kearns Eds. The Oxford Dictionary of Classical Myth and Religion. Oxford UP, 2003. Pp. Xl + 599. £9.99 (Pbk), 0192802895; £25 (Hbk), 0192802887. (R.) Buxton The Complete World of Greek Mythology. London: Thames and Hudson, 2004. Pp. 256, Illus. £24.95. 0200251215. (W.) Hansen Handbook of Classical Mythology. Santa Barbara: ABC Cl. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 126:144-148.
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  6.  16
    Joan B. Burton (2009). The Fragmentum Grenfellianum (E.) Esposito (ed., trans.) Il Fragmentum Grenfellianum (p. Dryton 50). Introduzione, testo critico, traduzione e commento. (Eikasmos. Quaderni Bolognesi di Filologia Classica. Studi 12.) Pp. iv + 203. Bologna: Pàtron Editore, 2005. Paper, €16. ISBN: 978-88-555-2879-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (1):91.
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  7. J. L. Bradshaw, A. M. Burton, J. I. D. Campbell, K. Christianson, S. Dehaene, J. L. Elman, F. Ferreira, V. S. Ferreira, G. Gigerenzer & R. Jenkins (2006). Liu, Y., B21 Massey, C., B75 Mattingley, JB, 53 Melinger, A., B11 Meseguer, E., B1. Cognition 98:309.
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  8. Diana Burton (2006). Greek Myth (E.) Csapo Theories of Mythology. Oxford: Blackwell, 2005. Pp. Xiii + 338. £17.99 (Pbk); 0631232486. £60 (Hbk), 0631232478. (C.) Calame Myth and History in Ancient Greece. The Symbolic Creation of a Colony. Princeton UP, 2003. Pp. Xvii + 178. £26.95. 0691114587. (S.M.) Trzaskoma, (R.S.) Smith and (S.) Brunet Anthology of Classical Myth. Primary Sources in Translation. Indianapolis: Hackett, 2004. Pp. Lvii + 517, Illus. £32 (Hbk), 0872207226; £11.95 (Pbk), 0872207218. (R.) Hard The Routledge Handbook of Greek Mythology. Based on H.J. Rose's Handbook of Greek Mythology. London: Routledge, 2004. Pp. Xx + 753, Illus. £125. 0415186366. (S.) Price and (E) Kearns Eds. The Oxford Dictionary of Classical Myth and Religion. Oxford UP, 2003. Pp. Xl + 599. £9.99 (Pbk), 0192802895; £25 (Hbk), 0192802887. (R.) Buxton The Complete World of Greek Mythology. London: Thames and Hudson, 2004. Pp. 256, Illus. £24.95. 0200251215. (W.) Hansen Handbook of Classical Mythology. Santa Barbara: ABC Cl. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 126:144-148.
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  9. Diana Burton (2006). Greek Myth (E.) Csapo Theories of Mythology. Oxford: Blackwell, 2005. Pp. Xiii + 338. £17.99 (Pbk); 0631232486. £60 (Hbk), 0631232478. (C.) Calame Myth and History in Ancient Greece. The Symbolic Creation of a Colony. Princeton UP, 2003. Pp. Xvii + 178. £26.95. 0691114587. (S.M.) Trzaskoma, (R.S.) Smith and (S.) Brunet Anthology of Classical Myth. Primary Sources in Translation. Indianapolis: Hackett, 2004. Pp. Lvii + 517, Illus. £32 (Hbk), 0872207226; £11.95 (Pbk), 0872207218. (R.) Hard The Routledge Handbook of Greek Mythology. Based on H.J. Rose's Handbook of Greek Mythology. London: Routledge, 2004. Pp. Xx + 753, Illus. £125. 0415186366. (S.) Price and (E) Kearns Eds. The Oxford Dictionary of Classical Myth and Religion. Oxford UP, 2003. Pp. Xl + 599. £9.99 (Pbk), 0192802895; £25 (Hbk), 0192802887. (R.) Buxton The Complete World of Greek Mythology. London: Thames and Hudson, 2004. Pp. 256, Illus. £24.95. 0200251215. (W.) Hansen Handbook of Classical Mythology. Santa Barbara: ABC Cl. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 126:144-148.
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  10.  4
    Jean E. Andruski, Sheila E. Blumstein & Martha Burton (1994). The Effect of Subphonetic Differences on Lexical Access. Cognition 52 (3):163-187.
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  11.  1
    Alison E. Hall & Hilary Burton (2010). Legal and Ethical Implications of Inherited Cardiac Disease in Clinical Practice Within the UK. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (12):762-766.
    Increasing genetic knowledge over the last decade has enabled hundreds of genetic variants associated with inherited cardiac conditions to be identified, many of which cause increased risk of sudden cardiac death. While individually these conditions are rare, taken together they impose a significant burden. The severity of these conditions—the possibility that they might cause sudden unheralded death of a teenager or young adult—juxtaposed with uncertainty about the pathology linked with many of the genetic variants is significant in terms of professional (...)
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  12. E. B. & Richard S. Burton (1963). The Kama-Sutra of Vatsyayana. Journal of the American Oriental Society 83 (2):279.
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  13. Michael Moore Kress, N. E. Simmonds & Steven Burton (1994). Brandt, Richard B. Morality, Utilitarianism, and Rights. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992. Pp. Viii+ 393. $49.95 (Cloth); $17.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] In Peter Singer (ed.), Ethics. Oxford University Press
     
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  14. John A. Darling, Adam R. Reitzel, Patrick M. Burton, Maureen E. Mazza, Joseph F. Ryan, James C. Sullivan & John R. Finnerty (2005). Rising Starlet: The Starlet Sea Anemone, Nematostella Vectensis. Bioessays 27 (2):211-221.
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  15. Wendy E. Burton (1994). Marilyn Pearsall, Women and Values: Readings in Recent Feminist Philosophy, Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (4):281-283.
  16. Allan Stoekl & Richard D. E. Burton (2003). Blood in the City: Violence and Revelation in Paris, 1789-1945. Substance 32 (3):165.
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  17.  7
    E. H. Warmington (1933). The Discovery of the Ancient World The Discovery of the Ancient World. By Harry E. Burton. Pp. 130; 4 Maps, Whole-Page. Cambridge, U.S.A.: Harvard University Press (London: Milford), 1932. Cloth, $1.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 47 (04):130-131.
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  18.  4
    Y. Du, X. Chen, X. Wei, K. R. Bales, D. T. Berg, S. M. Paul, M. R. Farlow, B. Maloney, Y. W. Ge & D. K. Lahiri (2005). NF-B Mediates Amyloid Beta Peptide-Stimulated Activity of the Human Apolipoprotein E Gene Promoter in Human Astroglial Cells. Brain Res Mol Brain Res 136:177-88.
    The apolipoprotein E gene plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease , and amyloid plaque comprised mostly of the amyloid-beta peptide ) is one of the major hallmarks of AD. However, the relationship between these two important molecules is poorly understood. We examined how A treatment affects APOE expression in cultured cells and tested the role of the transcription factor NF-B in APOE gene regulation. To delineate NF-B's role, we have characterized a 1098 nucleotide segment (...)
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  19.  4
    J. L. Myres (1932). Creative History A Study in Creative History. By O. E. Burton, M.A. (N.Z.). Pp. 320, 8vo. London: Allen and Unwin, 1932. Cloth, 10s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 46 (06):250-251.
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  20.  1
    Mark Cooper & Dean W. Podlich (2002). The E(NK) Model: Extending the NK Model to Incorporate Gene‐by‐Environment Interactions and Epistasis for Diploid Genomes. Complexity 7 (6):31-47.
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  21.  14
    Andrew Ellett (2000). Melanocortin-1-Receptor (Mcr-1) Gene Pol Ymorphisms Associated with the Chicken E Locus Alleles. Inquiry 1.
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  22.  6
    Leyla Mariane Joaquim & Charbel Niño El-Hani (2010). A genética em transformação: crise e revisão do conceito de gene. Scientiae Studia 8 (1):93-128.
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  23. Walter Birchmeier (1995). E-Cadherin as a Tumor Suppressor Gene. Bioessays 17 (2):97-99.
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  24.  3
    J. Weber (1995). Ethics Education (Gene R. Laczniak and Patrick E. Murphy, Ethical Marketing Decisions). Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (4):895-898.
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  25.  1
    David A. Pailin (1973). Brown Delwin, Ralph E. James Jr., and Reeves Gene . Process Philosophy and Christian Thought. Pp. 495. $6.95. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 9 (1):97.
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  26. Wendell V. Harris (1992). Walter E. Broman, Timothy C. Lord, Roy W. Perrett, Colin Dickson, Jill P. Baumgaertner, Eva L. Corredor, William E. Cain, Ronald Bogue, Timothy V. Kaufman-Osborn, Jay S. Andrews, David M. Thompson, David Carey, David Parker, David Novitz, Norman Simms, David Herman, Paul Taylor, Jeff Mason, Robert D. Cottrell, David Gorman, Mark Stein, Constance S. Spreen, Will Morrisey, Jan Pilditch, Herman Rapaport, Mark Johnson, Michael McClintick, John D. Cox, Arthur Kirsch, Burton Watson, Michael Platt, Gary M. Ciuba, Karsten Harries, Mary Anne O'Neil. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 16 (2):373.
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  27. Peter Karran (1990). Facts and Hypotheses About DNA Methylation DNA Methylation and Gene Regulation (1990). Edited by R. Holliday, M. Monk and J. E. Pugh. The Royal Society: London. 161pp. £35. [REVIEW] Bioessays 12 (9):454-455.
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  28. Richard C. Lewontin (1998). Gene, Organismo E Ambiente I Rapporti Causa-Effetto in Biologia. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  29. A. Stoekl, R. J. Golsan & R. Larson (2003). Burton, Richard D. E. Blood in the City: Violence and Revelation in Paris, 1789-1945. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2001. Pp. 395. [REVIEW] Substance 32 (3):165-167.
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  30. Richard T. Hull (1994). A Quarter Century of Value Inquiry: Presidential Addresses Before the American Society for Value Inquiry. Brill | Rodopi.
    This volume contains all of the presidential addresses given before the American Society for Value Inquiry since its first meeting in 1970. Contributions are by Richard Brandt*, Virgil Aldrich*, John W. Davis*, the late Robert S. Hartman*, James B. Wilbur*, the late William H. Werkmeister, Robert E. Carter, the late William T. Blackstone, Gene James, Eva Hauel Cadwallader, Richard T. Hull, Norman Bowie*, Stephen White*, Burton Leiser+, Abraham Edel, Sidney Axinn, Robert Ginsberg, Patricia Werhane, Lisa M. Newton, Thomas (...)
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  31.  20
    Alexis De Tiège, Koen Tanghe, Johan Braeckman & Yves Van de Peer (2014). From DNA- to NA-Centrism and the Conditions for Gene-Centrism Revisited. Biology and Philosophy 29 (1):55-69.
    First the ‘Weismann barrier’ and later on Francis Crick’s ‘central dogma’ of molecular biology nourished the gene-centric paradigm of life, i.e., the conception of the gene/genome as a ‘central source’ from which hereditary specificity unidirectionally flows or radiates into cellular biochemistry and development. Today, due to advances in molecular genetics and epigenetics, such as the discovery of complex post-genomic and epigenetic processes in which genes are causally integrated, many theorists argue that a gene-centric conception of the organism (...)
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  32.  5
    Peter J. Taylor (2012). A Gene-Free Formulation of Classical Quantitative Genetics Used to Examine Results and Interpretations Under Three Standard Assumptions. Acta Biotheoretica 60 (4):357-378.
    Quantitative genetics (QG) analyses variation in traits of humans, other animals, or plants in ways that take account of the genealogical relatedness of the individuals whose traits are observed. “Classical” QG, where the analysis of variation does not involve data on measurable genetic or environmental entities or factors, is reformulated in this article using models that are free of hypothetical, idealized versions of such factors, while still allowing for defined degrees of relatedness among kinds of individuals or “varieties.” The (...) - free formulation encompasses situations encountered in human QG as well as in agricultural QG. This formulation is used to describe three standard assumptions involved in classical QG and provide plausible alternatives. Several concerns about the partitioning of trait variation into components and its interpretation, most of which have a long history of debate, are discussed in light of the gene-free formulation and alternative assumptions. That discussion is at a theoretical level, not dependent on empirical data in any particular situation. Additional lines of work to put the gene-free formulation and alternative assumptions into practice and to assess their empirical consequences are noted, but lie beyond the scope of this article. The three standard QG assumptions examined are: (1) partitioning of trait variation into components requires models of hypothetical, idealized genes with simple Mendelian inheritance and direct contributions to the trait; (2) all other things being equal, similarity in traits for relatives is proportional to the fraction shared by the relatives of all the genes that vary in the population (e.g., fraternal or dizygotic twins share half of the variable genes that identical or monozygotic twins share); (3) in analyses of human data, genotype-environment interaction variance (in the classical QG sense) can be discounted. The concerns about the partitioning of trait variation discussed include: the distinction between traits and underlying measurable factors; the possible heterogeneity in factors underlying the development of a trait; the kinds of data needed to estimate key empirical parameters; and interpretations based on contributions of hypothetical genes; as well as, in human studies, the labeling of residual variance as a non-shared environmental effect; and the importance of estimating interaction variance. (shrink)
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  33.  25
    Peter J. Richersona, Gene-Culture Coevolution in the Age of Genomics.
    The use of socially learned information (culture) is central to human adaptations. We investigate the hypothesis that the process of cultural evolution has played an active, leading role in the evolution of genes. Culture normally evolves more rapidly than genes, creating novel environments that expose genes to new selective pressures. Many human genes that have been shown to be under recent or current selection are changing as a result of new environments created by cultural innovations. Some changed in response to (...)
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  34.  2
    Rabia R. Chhangur, Joyce Weeland, Walter Matthys & Geertjan Overbeek (2015). Gene by Environment Research to Prevent Externalizing Problem Behavior: Ethical Questions Raised From a Public Healthcare Perspective. Public Health Ethics 8 (3):295-304.
    The main public health advantages of examining gene by environment interactions in externalizing behavior lie in the realm of personalized interventions. Nevertheless, the incorporation of genetic data in randomized controlled trials is fraught with difficulties and raises ethical questions. This paper has been written from the perspective of developmental psychologists who, as researchers, see themselves confronted with important and in part new kinds of ethical questions arising from G × E research in social sciences. The aim is to explicate (...)
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  35.  58
    Matthew J. Barker (2007). The Empirical Inadequacy of Species Cohesion by Gene Flow. Philosophy of Science 74 (5):654-665.
    This paper brings needed clarity to the influential view that species are cohesive entities held together by gene flow, and then develops an empirical argument against that view: Neglected data suggest gene flow is neither necessary nor sufficient for species cohesion. Implications are discussed. ‡I'm grateful to Rob Wilson, Alex Rueger and Lindley Darden for important comments on earlier drafts, and to Joseph Nagel, Heather Proctor, Ken Bond, members of the DC History and Philosophy of Biology reading group, (...)
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  36.  14
    Christian P. Müller, Bernd Lenz & Johannes Kornhuber (2012). Gene-Independent Heritability of Behavioural Traits: Don't We Also Need to Rethink the “Environment”? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (5):374-375.
    Behavioural phenotypes have been explained by genetic and environmental factors (E) and their interaction. Here we suggest a rethinking of the E factor. Passively incurred environmental influences (E pass) and actively copied information and behaviour (E act) may be distinguished at shared and non-shared level. We argue that E act underlies mutation and selection and is the base of gene-independent heritability.
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  37. Gene R. Garthwaite, Heribert Busse, Hasan-E. Fasā'I' & Hasan-E. Fasa'I' (1974). History of Persia Under Qājār Rule: Translated From the Persian of Hasan-E Fasā'i's Fārsnāma-Ye NāṣeriHistory of Persia Under Qajar Rule: Translated From the Persian of Hasan-E Fasa'i's Farsnama-Ye Naseri. Journal of the American Oriental Society 94 (2):248.
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  38.  50
    Paul E. Griffiths (2006). The Fearless Vampire Conservator: Philip Kitcher, Genetic Determinism and the Informational Gene. In Christoph Rehmann-Sutter & Eva M. Neumann-Held (eds.), Genes in Development: Rethinking the Molecular Paradigm. Duke University Press 175--198.
    Genetic determinism is the idea that many significant human characteristics are rendered inevitable by the presence of certain genes. The psychologist Susan Oyama has famously compared arguing against genetic determinism to battling the undead. Oyama suggests that genetic determinism is inherent in the way we currently represent genes and what genes do. As long as genes are represented as containing information about how the organism will develop, they will continue to be regarded as determining causes no matter how much evidence (...)
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  39.  4
    Laurence Perbal (2013). G×E Interaction and Pluralism in the Postgenomic Era. Biological Theory 7 (3):266-274.
    Genetics is in a postgenomic era, and this article illustrates this epistemological evolution using the debate between developmental criticism and traditional biometric genetics about gene × environment interaction. Quantitative geneticists are blamed for failing to respect the complexity of development; as a response, they claim a defensive position, called isolationist pluralism, which supports the idea that studying development is not their problem. But postgenomics seems to have accepted and integrated some developmental criticisms and the isolationist perspective has been challenged (...)
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  40.  65
    Paul E. Griffiths & Karola Stotz (2007). Gene. In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press
    The historian Raphael Falk has described the gene as a ‘concept in tension’ (Falk 2000) – an idea pulled this way and that by the differing demands of different kinds of biological work. Several authors have suggested that in the light of contemporary molecular biology ‘gene’ is no more than a handy term which acquires a specific meaning only in a specific scientific context in which it occurs. Hence the best way to answer the question ‘what is a (...)
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  41. H. Clark Barrett, Willem E. Frankenhuis & Andreas Wilke (2008). Adaptation to Moving Targets: Culture/Gene Coevolution, Not Either/Or. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):511-512.
    We agree that much of language evolution is likely to be adaptation of languages to properties of the brain. However, the attempt to rule out the existence of language-specific adaptations a priori is misguided. In particular, the claim that adaptation to cannot occur is false. Instead, the details of gene-culture coevolution in language are an empirical matter.
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  42.  13
    E. M. Berger & B. M. Gert (1991). Genetic Disorders and the Ethical Status of Germ-Line Gene Therapy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (6):667-683.
    Recombinant DNA technology will soon allow physicians an opportunity to carry out both somatic cell- and Germ-Line gene therapy. While somatic cell gene therapy raises no new ethical problems, gene therapy of gametes, fertilized eggs or early embryos does raise several novel concerns. The first issue discussed here relates to making a distinction between negative and positive eugenics; the second issue deals with the evolutionary consequences of lost genetic diversity. In distinguishing between positive and negative eugenics, the (...)
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  43.  6
    Garland E. Allen (2014). Origins of the Classical Gene Concept, 1900–1950: Genetics, Mechanistic, Philosophy, and the Capitalization of Agriculture. [REVIEW] Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 57 (1):8-39.
    As many of the papers in this Special Symposium Issue discuss, by the 21st century we have moved well beyond the notion of a gene as a single particulate unit coding for a given protein, or especially a single phenotypic trait. Yet notions of genes as some kind of single, particulate entity still persist, especially in textbooks and writings about genetics for the general public. To understand this disjunct between the professional geneticist’s view of genes and their complex interactions, (...)
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  44. A. C. Love, M. E. Lee & R. A. Raff (2007). Gene Expression Patterns in a Novel Animal Appendage: The Sea Urchin Pluteus Arm. Evolution & Development 9:51–68.
    The larval arms of echinoid plutei are used for locomotion and feeding. They are composed of internal calcite skeletal rods covered by an ectoderm layer bearing a ciliary band. Skeletogenesis includes an autonomous molecular differentiation program in primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs), initiated when PMCs leave the vegetal plate for the blastocoel, and a patterning of the differentiated skeletal units that requires molecular cues from the overlaying ectoderm. The arms represent a larval feature that arose in the echinoid lineage during the (...)
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  45. Marcel Weber, Reference, Truth, and Biological Kinds. In: J. Dutant, D. Fassio and A. Meylan (Eds.) Liber Amicorum Pascal Engel.
    This paper examines causal theories of reference with respect to how plausible an account they give of non-physical natural kind terms such as ‘gene’ as well as of the truth of the associated theoretical claims. I first show that reference fixism for ‘gene’ fails. By this, I mean the claim that the reference of ‘gene’ was stable over longer historical periods, for example, since the classical period of transmission genetics. Second, I show that the theory of partial (...)
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  46. Gail E. Henderson & Nancy M. P. King (forthcoming). Studying Benefit in Gene Transfer Research. IRB: Ethics & Human Research.
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  47. E. Keller (2013). The Century Beyond the Gene. Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 4 (1):217-234.
     
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  48.  13
    James Tabery, Biometric and Developmental Gene-Environment Interaction: Looking Back, Moving Forward.
    I provide a history of research on G×E in this article, showing that there have actually been two distinct concepts of G×E since the very origins of this research. R. A. Fisher introduced what I call the biometric concept of G×E, or G×EB, while Lancelot Hogben introduced what I call the developmental concept of G×E, or G×ED. Much of the subsequent history of research on G×E has largely consisted in the separate legacies of these separate concepts, along with the (sometimes (...)
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  49.  71
    Slobodan Perovic & Ljiljana Radenovic (2011). Fine-Tuning Nativism: The 'Nurtured Nature' and Innate Cognitive Structures. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (3):399-417.
    S. Oyama’s prominent account of the Parity Thesis states that one cannot distinguish in a meaningful way between nature-based (i.e. gene-based) and nurture-based (i.e. environment-based) characteristics in development because the information necessary for the resulting characteristics is contained at both levels. Oyama as well as P. E. Griffiths and K. Stotz argue that the Parity Thesis has far-reaching implications for developmental psychology in that both nativist and interactionist developmental accounts of psychological capacities that presuppose a substantial nature/nurture dichotomy are (...)
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  50.  92
    Monika Piotrowska (2009). What Does It Mean to Be 75% Pumpkin? The Units of Comparative Genomics. Philosophy of Science 76 (5):838-850.
    Comparative genomicists seem to be convinced that the unit of measurement employed in their studies is a gene that drives the function of cells and ultimately organisms. As a result, they have come to some substantive conclusions about how similar humans are to other organisms based on the percentage of genetic makeup they share. I argue that the actual unit of measurement employed in the studies corresponds to a structural rather than a functional gene concept, thus rendering many (...)
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