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Profile: Gene Fendt (University of Nebraska at Kearney)
  1. Gene Fendt (2014). Comic Cure for Delusional Democracy: Plato's Republic. Lexington Books.
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  2. Gene Fendt (2014). Socrates and the Gods: How to Read Plato's Euthyphro, Apology and Crito. By Nalin Ranasinghe. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):187-189.
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  3. Gene Fendt (2010). Plato's Mimetic Art. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:239-252.
    Plato’s dialogues are self-defined as works of mimetic art, and the ancients clearly consider mimesis as working naturally before reason and beneath it. Such aview connects with two contemporary ideas—Rene Girard’s idea of the mimetic basis of culture and neurophysiological research into mirror neurons. Individualityarises out of, and can collapse back into our mimetic origin. This para-rational notion of mimesis as that in which and by which all our knowledge is framed requires we not only concern ourselves with Socrates’s arguments (...)
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  4. Gene Fendt (2009). Number, Form, Content: Hume's Dialogues , Number Nine. Philosophy 84 (3):393-412.
    This paper's aim is threefold. First, I wish to show that there is an analogy in section nine that arises out of the interaction of the interlocutors; this analogy is, or has, a certain comic adequatic to the traditional (e.g. Aquinas's) arguments about proofs for the existence of God. Second, Philo's seemingly inconsequential example of the strange necessity of products of 9 in section nine is a perfected analogy of the broken arguments actually given in that section, destroying Philo's earlier (...)
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  5. Gene Fendt (2009). Number, Form, Content: Hume's 'Dialogues'. Philosophy 84 (329):393 - 412.
    This paper’s aim is threefold. First, I wish to show that there is an analogy in section nine that arises out of the interaction of the interlocutors; this analogy is, or has, a certain comic adequatic to the traditional (e.g., Aquinas’s) arguments about proofs for the existence of God. Second, Philo’s seemingly inconsequential example of the strange necessity of products of 9 in section nine is a perfected analogy of the broken arguments actually given in that section, destroying Philo’s earlier (...)
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  6. Gene Fendt (2009). Sweet Use: Genre and Performance of the Merchant of Venice. Philosophy and Literature 33 (2):pp. 280-295.
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  7. Gene Fendt (2005). The Relation of Monologion and Proslogion. Heythrop Journal 46 (2):149–166.
    This paper argues that Monologion and Proslogion though distinguishable are not really separable. They are distinct as "the way in" and "the way when one is in" but "the way in" reveals itself as a discovery of already being in; thus these ways are distinct in act, but not in being. Monologion moves from imaginary ignorance to real reverence, while Proslogion begins within reverence to achieve understanding.
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  8. Gene Fendt (2004). Upheavals of Thought. Faith and Philosophy 21 (3):402-406.
  9. Gene Fendt (2003). Hippias Major, Version 1.0: Software for Post-Colonial, Multicultural Technology Systems. Journal of Philosophy of Education 37 (1):89–99.
  10. Gene Fendt (1998). Platonic Errors: Plato, a Kind of Poet. Greenwood Press.
    Poetic and dramatic readings of selected Platonic dialogues show the fallacy of the philosophical and political positions usually attributed to Plato.
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  11. Gene Fendt (1998). The (Moral) Problem of Reading Confessions. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 72:171-184.
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  12. Gene Fendt (1997). Ion. International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):23-50.
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  13. Gene Fendt (1997). The Empiricist Looks at a Poem. Philosophy and Literature 21 (2):306-318.
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  14. Gene Fendt (1997). The Others In/Of Aristotle's Poetics. Journal of Philosophical Research 22:245-260.
    This paper aims at interpreting (primarily) the first six chapters of Aristotle’s Poetics in a way that dissolves many of the scholarly arguments conceming them. It shows that Aristotle frequently identifies the object of his inquiry by opposing it to what is other than it (in several different ways). As a result aporiai arise where there is only supposed to be illuminating exclusion of one sort or another. Two exemplary cases of this in chapters 1-6 are Aristotle’s account of mimesis (...)
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  15. Gene Fendt (1997). Book Review: Mimesis: Culture, Art, Society. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 21 (1):199-201.
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  16. Gene Fendt (1995). Confessions'bliss: Postmodern Criticism as a Palimpsest of Augustine's Confessions. Heythrop Journal 36 (1):30–45.
  17. Gene Fendt (1995). God Is Love, Therefore There Is Evil. Philosophy and Theology 9 (1/2):3-12.
    This paper attempts to explicate the philosophical and theological premisses involved in Fr. Paneloux’s second sermon in Camus’ The Plague. In that sermon Fr. Paneloux says that the suffering of children is our bread of affliction. The article shows where one must start in order to get to that point, and what follows from it. Whether or not the argument given should be called a theodicy or a reductio ad absurdum of religious belief is an open question for a philosopher, (...)
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  18. Gene Fendt (1995). Resolution, Catharsis, Culture: As You Like It. Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):248-260.
  19. Gene Fendt (1994). Innate Corruption and the Space of Finite Freedom. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (2):179-201.
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  20. Gene Fendt (1994). Libidinal Economy and the Life of Logos. Philosophy and Literature 18 (2):320-325.
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  21. Lewis S. Ford, Louis P. Pojman, Edward L. Schoen, Donald Wayne Viney, George I. Mavrodes & Gene Fendt (1993). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 34 (3):181-194.
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