Search results for 'Genealogy (Philosophy History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Paul Katsafanas (2011). The Relevance of History for Moral Philosophy: A Study of Nietzsche's Genealogy. In Simon May (ed.), Nietzsche's 'On the Genealogy of Morality': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press
    The Genealogy takes a historical form. But does the history play an essential role in Nietzsche's critique of modern morality? In this essay, I argue that the answer is yes. The Genealogy employs history in order to show that acceptance of modern morality was causally responsible for producing a dramatic change in our affects, drives, and perceptions. This change led agents to perceive actual increases in power as reductions in power, and actual decreases in power as (...)
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  2. Stephen Gaukroger (1997). The Genealogy of Knowledge Analytical Essays in the History of Philosophy and Science. Ashgate.
     
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  3.  3
    Chloë Taylor (2012). Archaeologizing Art History: An Encounter with Foucault's Philosophy of Art: A Genealogy of Modernity, Joseph Tanke. Phaenex 7 (1):365-374.
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  4.  7
    Yvonne Sherratt (2006). Continental Philosophy of Social Science: Hermeneutics, Genealogy, Critical Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    Continental Philosophy of Social Science demonstrates the unique and autonomous nature of the continental approach to social science and contrasts it with the Anglo-American tradition. Yvonne Sherratt argues for the importance of an historical understanding of the Continental tradition in order to appreciate its individual, humanist character. Examining the key traditions of hermeneutic, genealogy, and critical theory, and the texts of major thinkers such as Gadamer, Ricoeur, Derrida, Nietzsche, Foucault, the Early Frankfurt School and Habermas, she also contextualizes (...)
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  5. Martin Saar (2008). Understanding Genealogy: History, Power, and the Self. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):295-314.
    The aim of this article is to clarify the relation between genealogy and history and to suggest a methodological reading of Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals. I try to determine genealogy's specific range of objects, specific mode of explication, and specific textual form. Genealogies in general can be thought of as drastic narratives of the emergence and transformations of forms of subjectivity related to power, told with the intention to induce doubt and self-reflection in exactly those readers (...)
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  6.  7
    Andrius Gališanka (2015). History as Philosophy? Genealogies and Critique. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (3):444-464.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 444 - 464 Are genealogies of our beliefs relevant to the truth of these beliefs? Drawing on Bernard Williams’s _Truth and Truthfulness_, I argue that genealogies, or historical narratives showing how a set of beliefs came about, can be either critical or vindicatory of these beliefs. They can be critical by denaturalizing beliefs, showing their continued inability to solve explanatory problems, revealing the origins of these beliefs in assumptions that we no longer accept, (...)
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  7. Cornel West (1989). The American Evasion of Philosophy: A Genealogy of Pragmatism. University of Wisconsin Press.
    Taking Emerson as his starting point, Cornel West’s basic task in this ambitious enterprise is to chart the emergence, development, decline, and recent resurgence of American pragmatism. John Dewey is the central figure in West’s pantheon of pragmatists, but he treats as well such varied mid-century representatives of the tradition as Sidney Hook, C. Wright Mills, W. E. B. Du Bois, Reinhold Niebuhr, and Lionel Trilling. West’s "genealogy" is, ultimately, a very personal work, for it is imbued throughout with (...)
     
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  8.  44
    Allison Merrick (2013). History in the Service of Life: Nietzsche's 'Genealogy'. In S. Campbell & P. Bruno (eds.), The Science, Politics, and Ontology of Life-Philosophy. Bloomsbury
  9. David Michael Kleinberg-Levin (ed.) (1999). Sites of Vision: The Discursive Construction of Sight in the History of Philosophy. The MIT Press.
    In recent years scholars from many disciplines have become interested in the "construction" of the human senses -- in how the human environment shapes both how and what we perceive. Taking a very different approach to the question of construction, Sites of Vision turns to language and explores the ways in which the rhetoric of philosophy has formed the nature of vision and how, in turn, the rhetoric of vision has helped to shape philosophical thought. The central role of vision (...)
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  10.  1
    Oliver Feltham (2006). An Explosive geneAlogy: theAtre, Philosophy And the Art of presentAtion. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 2 (1-2):226-240.
    Not only in its conceptual reconstruction but also in the straightforward application of Badioursquo;s thought its problems and tensions come to light. This paper thus sets out to identify a generic truth procedure in the domain of art; specifically within theatre starting out from the Meyerhold-event and tracing enquiries in the work of Artaud and Brecht. It turns out once one follows the lines of further enquiries one ends up sketching an explosive genealogy that gives rise to the concept (...)
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  11. Gladys Rosaleen Turquet-Milnes (1926/1977). From Pascal to Proust: Studies in the Genealogy of a Philosophy. Haskell House Pub..
    Introductory.--Bergson and Pascal.--Bergson and Molière.--Balzac.--Meredith and the cosmic spirit.--The new criticism: Albert Thibaudet.--Marcel Proust.
     
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  12.  3
    Gregor Kroupa (2011). Domnevna zgodovina: dejstva in fikcija. Filozofski Vestnik 32 (1):37-50.
    The article deals with a seldom exposed but ubiquitous method in the 18th century philosophy, named conjectural history by Dugald Stewart. Its characteristic feature is a peculiar combination of historically verified facts and speculations, which in some authors are even openly fictitious. The hypotheses about prehistory (always set forth in the form of temporal historical narrative) are meant to aid a certain classic philosophical topos of the 18th century: the quest for origins. The article first surveys and compares common (...)
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  13.  60
    Ronald Beiner (2010). Civil Religion: A Dialogue in the History of Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Part I. Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau: Three Versions of the Civil Religion Project: 1. Rousseau's problem; 2. The Machiavellian solution: paganization of Christianity; 3. Moses and Mohammed as founder-princes or legislators; 4. Re-founding and 'filiacide': Machiavelli's debt to Christianity; 5. The Hobbesian solution: Judaicization of Christianity; 6. Behemoth: Hobbesian 'theocracy' versus the real thing; 7. Geneva Manuscript: the apparent availability of a Rousseauian solution; 8. Social Contract: the ultimate unavailability of a Rousseauian solution; Part II. Responses to (...)
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  14.  6
    H. & (2012). Introduction: Castoriadis, Genealogy, History. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 8 (2):1-2.
    Editorial introduction to the special issue on the work of Castoriadis.
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  15.  2
    H. Editor C. (2012). Introduction: Castoriadis, Genealogy, History. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 8 (2):1-2.
    Editorial introduction to the special issue on the work of Castoriadis.
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  16.  65
    Simon May (ed.) (2011). Nietzsche's on the Genealogy of Morality: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: List of contributors; Acknowledgements; Note on texts, translations, references; Introduction Simon May; 1. The future of evil Raymond Geuss; 2. On the nobility of Nietzsche's priests R. Lanier Anderson; 3. The genealogy of guilt Bernard Reginster; 4. Why Nietzsche is still in the morality game Simon May; 5. Who is the 'sovereign individual'? Nietzsche on freedom Brian Leiter; 6. Ressentiment and morality Peter Poellner; 7. The role of life in the Genealogy Nadeem Hussain; 8. (...)
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  17.  37
    Eric Blondel (1991). Nietzsche, the Body and Culture: Philosophy as a Philological Genealogy. Stanford University Press.
    Introduction I am a nuance. Nietzsche Reading is always a risky business: we confront an enigma or run the risk of roaming. But doesn't reading Nietzsche ...
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  18. Anna Makolkin (2000). The Genealogy of Our Present Moral Disarray: An Essay in Comparative Philosophy. E. Mellen Press.
     
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  19.  91
    David Owen (1992). Reviews : Eric Blondel (Trans. Seán Hand), Nietzsche: The Body and Culture: Philosophy as a Philological Genealogy. London: The Athlone Press, 1991. £40.00, 353 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 5 (1):103-106.
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  20.  96
    Tyler Krupp (2008). Genealogy as Critique? Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):315-337.
    This essay explores whether, and how, genealogy might remain critical within anti-foundationalist philosophical contexts. While adherents of genealogy often presume that genealogy simply is inherently critical in any context, adherents of historicized forms of anti-foundationalist philosophy might rightly wonder whether genealogy can continue to serve any critical purpose whatsoever. Is genealogy a form of historical inquiry that can be done away with once a shift has been made towards historicized forms of anti-foundationalist philosophy? Why continue (...)
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  21.  6
    Allison M. Merrick (2014). On the Role of History in Nietzsche’s Genealogy. Southwest Philosophy Review 30 (2):101-120.
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  22.  52
    Thomas Biebricher (2008). Genealogy and Governmentality. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):363-396.
    The essay aims at an assessment of whether and to what extent the history of governmentality can be considered to be a genealogy. To this effect a generic account of core tenets of Foucauldian genealogy is developed. The three core tenets highlighted are (1) a radically contingent view of history that is (2) expressed in a distinct style and (3) highlights the impact of power on this history. After a brief discussion of the concept of (...)
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  23.  27
    Philip J. Kain (1996). Nietzschean Genealogy and Hegelian History in "The Genealogy of Morals". Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):123-147.
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  24.  4
    Elie Georges Noujain (1987). History as Genealogy: An Exploration of Foucault's Approach to History. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 21:157-174.
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  25.  7
    Wendy Lee-Lampshire (1991). History as Genealogy. Philosophy and Theology 5 (4):313-331.
    The aim of the following paper is, firstly, to provide the reader with a brief exposition of the critical response offered by some current french feminists of the largely American, compensatory approach to feminist historiography. Secondly, I wish to show why the french feminist alternative itself provides an inadequate methodology for the resolution of the problems that it raises in its critique. Lastly, I shall suggest that the Wittgensteinian concept of ‘family resemblance’ contains the seeds of a plausible alternative to (...)
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  26.  13
    Steve Fuller (2002). The Pride of Losers: A Genealogy of the Philosophy of Science. History and Theory 41 (3):392–409.
  27.  2
    Timothy H. Wilson (1995). Foucault, Genealogy, History. Philosophy Today 39 (2):157-170.
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  28. M. O'Callaghan (2006). History, History‐Writing, the Genealogy of Partition and 'the Troubles' in Ireland. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 9 (4):619-634.
     
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  29. Thomas Wägenbaur (1993). The Moment: A History, Typology, and Theory of the Moment in Philosophy and Literatur[E]. P. Lang.
    The historical and typological failure to represent in writing the phenomenon of the moment--light, wonder, love, unity, god, etc.--has repeatedly turned into the success of performance: writing. An examination of the various textualizations of the moment reveals it as a signifier that empties itself of the meaning it is supposed to signify, while instead it generates ever new meaning. Therefore the historical and typological textualizations of the moment of epiphany, dialectical change, recollection, deferral, etc., must be read as a (...) and an economy . This reading of the moment consists in a three-part discussion of philosophical and literary texts on epiphany in Plato and Dante, on the romantic moment in Kant, Schelling, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, and Wordsworth, and on the post/modern moment in Heidegger, Adorno, Nietzsche, Derrida, Goethe, Musil, and Beckett. The romantic moment deserves special attention because of its instability in foregrounding presence and absence. An intimate relationship can be seen between the romantic moment of instability and the post-modern moment of a regulated instability which ultimately shows that the romantic/post-modern moment constitutes the momentum of all previous periods and textualizations of the moment. This examination of the genealogical and economic shapings of the moment reveals it as a rhetorical device. In terms of a politics of semiotics the moment always performatively subverts its political representation. (shrink)
     
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  30.  16
    Nicholas Jardine (2007). Dead Questions and Vicarious Understandings: Questioning Gadamer's Genealogy. Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (1):63-78.
    Gadamer's Truth and Method emphasises the priority of engagement with questions in the process of interpretation; however, there are passages which appear dismissive of concerns with 'dead' scientific and philosophical questions. Here I argue that Gadamer's work is nevertheless an important resource for the historical study of the genesis and dissolution of questions. This type of study can overcome the divide between internal history of contents and external history of contexts. In both philosophy and the sciences, reflection on (...)
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  31.  93
    C. G. Prado (2000). Starting with Foucault: An Introduction to Genealogy. Westview Press.
    Michel Foucault had a great influence upon a wide range of disciplines, and his work has been widely interpreted and is frequently referred to, but it is often difficult for beginners to find their way into the complexities of his thought. This is especially true for readers whose background is Anglo-American or "analytic" philosophy. C. G. Prado argues in this updated introduction that the time is overdue for Anglo-American philosophers to avail themselves of what Foucault offers. In this clear and (...)
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  32. Philip Barker (1993). Michel Foucault: Subversions of the Subject. St. Martin's Press.
    This unique and original study analyzes Foucault's interaction with the history of ideas, undertaking a genealogy of the subject that subverts conventional philosophical history to develop a distinctly Foucauldian intellectual history. Through a detailed account of Foucault's work and its relation to the history of ideas, Philip Barker shows how that history can be usefully reconceptualised using Foucault's concepts of genealogy and archaeology. Locating the emergence of self-reflexive consciousness in twelfth century philosophy, and (...)
     
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  33.  65
    Colin Koopman (2008). Foucault's Historiographical Expansion: Adding Genealogy to Archaeology. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):338-362.
    This paper offers a rereading of Foucault's much-disputed mid-career historiographical shift to genealogy from his earlier archaeological analytic. Disputing the usual view that this shift involves an abandonment of an archaeological method that was then replaced by a genealogical method, I show that this shift is better conceived as a historiographical expansion. Foucault's work subsequent to this shift should be understood as invoking both genealogy and archaeology. The metaphor of expansion is helpful in clarifying what was involved in (...)
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  34. P. M. M. Klep, Carla Hoetink & Thijs Emons (eds.) (2005). Persoonlijk Verleden: Over Geschiedenis, Individu En Identiteit. Aksant.
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  35.  59
    James Chase (2010). Analytic Versus Continental: Arguments on the Methods and Value of Philosophy. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Introduction : analytic versus continental : arguments on the methods and value of philosophy -- Frege and Husserl -- Russell versus Bergson -- Carnap versus Heidegger -- The Frankfurt School, the positivists and Popper -- Royaumont : Ryle and Hare versus French and German philosophy -- Derrida versus Searle and beyond -- Introduction to philosophical method -- Analytic philosophy and the intuition pump : the uses and abuses of thought experiments -- Reflective equilibrium : commone sense (...)
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  36.  9
    Brent Davis (2004). Inventions of Teaching: A Genealogy. L. Erlbaum Associates.
    Inventions of Teaching: A Genealogy is a powerful examination of current metaphors for and synonyms of teaching. It offers an account of the varied and conflicting influences and conceptual commitments that have contributed to contemporary vocabularies--and that are in some ways maintained by those vocabularies, in spite of inconsistencies and incompatibilities among popular terms. The concern that frames the book is how speakers of English invented (in the original sense of the word, "came upon") our current vocabularies for teaching. (...)
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  37.  42
    Conor Cunningham (2002). Genealogy of Nihilism: Philosophies of Nothing and the Difference of Theology. Routledge.
    Nihilism is the logic of nothing as something, which claims that Nothing Is. Its unmaking of things, and its forming of formless things, strain the fundamental terms of existence: what it is to be, to know, to be known. But nihilism, the antithesis of God, is also like theology. Where nihilism creates nothingness, condenses it to substance, God also makes nothingness creative. Negotiating the borders of spirit and substance, theology can ask the questions of nihilism that other disciplines do not (...)
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  38.  3
    Larry Shiner (1982). Reading Foucault: Anti-Method and the Genealogy of Power-Knowledge. History and Theory 21 (3):382-398.
    Foucault's writing is best understood in terms of its political purpose and of the political question it puts to philosophy, history, and the human sciences. Foucault is not looking for a "method" which will be superior to other methods in objectivity but is forging tools of analysis which take their starting point in the political-intellectual conflicts of the present. His method is really an antimethod, "genealogy," which seeks to free us from the illusion that an apolitical method is (...)
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  39.  16
    Dan Edelstein (2010). The Enlightenment: A Genealogy. University of Chicago Press.
    Interpreting the Enlightenment: on methods -- A map of the Enlightenment: whither France? -- The spirit of the moderns: from the new science to the Enlightenment -- Society, the subject of the modern story -- Quarrel in the Academy: the ancients strike back -- Humanism and Enlightenment: the classical style of the philosophes -- The philosophical spirit of the laws: politics and antiquity -- An ancient god: pagans and philosophers -- Post tenebras lux: Begriffsgeschichte or regime d'historicité? -- Ancients and (...)
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  40.  9
    Rudi Visker (1995). Michel Foucault: Genealogy as Critique. Verso.
    Rudi Visker's book is not only a lucid and elegant survey of Foucault's corpus, from his early work on madness to the History of Sexuality, but also a major intervention in this debate.
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  41. Mark Bevir (2008). What is Genealogy? Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):263-275.
    This paper offers a theory of genealogy, explaining its rise in the nineteenth century, its epistemic commitments, its nature as critique, and its place in the work of Nietzsche and Foucault. The crux of the theory is recognition of genealogy as an expression of a radical historicism, rejecting both appeals to transcendental truths and principles of unity or progress in history, and embracing nominalism, contingency, and contestability. In this view, genealogies are committed to the truth of radical (...)
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  42.  93
    David Couzens Hoy (2008). Genealogy, Phenomenology, Critical Theory. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):276-294.
    This paper explains the genealogical method as it is understood and employed in contemporary Continental philosophy. Using a pair of terms from Bernard Williams, genealogy is contrasted with phenomenology as an `unmasking' as opposed to a `vindicatory' method. The genealogical method is also compared with the method of Ideologiekritik and recent critical theory. Although genealogy is usually thought to be allergic to universals, in fact Foucault, Derrida, and Bourdieu do not shun universals, even if they approach them with (...)
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  43.  35
    Colin Koopman (2011). Genealogical Pragmatism: How History Matters for Foucault and Dewey. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):533-561.
    This article offers the outlines of a historically-informed conception of critical inquiry herein named genealogical pragmatism. This conception of critical inquiry combines the genealogical emphasis on problematization featured in Michel Foucault's work with the pragmatist emphasis on reconstruction featured in John Dewey's work. The two forms of critical inquiry featured by these thinkers are not opposed, as is too commonly supposed. Genealogical problematization and pragmatist reconstruction fit together for reason of their mutual emphasis on the importance of history for (...)
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  44.  22
    Patrick Baert (1998). Foucault's History of the Present as Self-Referential Knowledge Acquisition. Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (6):111-126.
    Underlying this article is the conviction that social scientists typically take on board a too restrictive concept of knowledge acquisition. The paper propounds a new concept of knowledge acquisition, one which is self-referential (i.e. which affects one's presuppositions) and which draws upon the unfamiliar to reveal and undercut the familiar. The aim of this paper is twofold. First, it is to show that this concept of knowledge acqui sition is already anticipated by Foucault, that it is a major concern of (...)
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  45. Garin Dowd, Abstract Machines: Samuel Beckett and Philosophy After Deleuze and Guattari.
    What can philosophy bring to the reading of Beckett? Combining intertextual analysis with a ‘schizoanalytic genealogy’ derived from the authors of L’Anti-Œdipe, Garin Dowd’sMachines: Samuel Beckett and Philosophy after Deleuze and Guattari offers an innovative response to this much debated question. The author focuses on zones of encounter and thresholds of engagement between Beckett’s writing and a range of philosophers and philosophical concepts. Beckett’s writing impacts in a variety of ways on Deleuze and Guattari’s thought, (...)
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  46. Bernard Williams (2004). Truth and Truthfulness: An Essay in Genealogy. Princeton University Press.
    What does it mean to be truthful? What role does truth play in our lives? What do we lose if we reject truthfulness? No philosopher is better suited to answer these questions than Bernard Williams. Writing with his characteristic combination of passion and elegant simplicity, he explores the value of truth and finds it to be both less and more than we might imagine.Modern culture exhibits two attitudes toward truth: suspicion of being deceived and skepticism that objective truth exists at (...)
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  47.  70
    Marco Solinas (2015). From Aristotle’s Teleology to Darwin’s Genealogy: The Stamp of Inutility, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Starting with Aristotle and moving on to Darwin, Marco Solinas outlines the basic steps from the birth, establishment and later rebirth of the traditional view of living beings, and its overturning by evolutionary revolution. The classic framework devised by Aristotle was still dominant in the 17th Century world of Galileo, Harvey and Ray, and remained hegemonic until the time of Lamarck and Cuvier in the 19th Century. Darwin's breakthrough thus takes on the dimensions of an abandonment of the traditional finalistic (...)
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  48. Alan D. Schrift (1995). Nietzsche's French Legacy: A Genealogy of Poststructuralism. Routledge.
    More than any other figure, Friedrich Nietzsche is cited as the philosopher who anticipates and previews the philosophical themes that have dominated French theory since structuralism. Informed by the latest developments in both contemporary French philosophy and Nietzsche scholarship, Alan Schrift's Nietzsche's French Legacy provides a detailed examination and analysis of the way the French have appropriated Nietzsche in developing their own critical projects. Using Nietzsche's thought as a springboard, this study makes accessible the ideas of some of the most (...)
     
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  49.  14
    Manuel Dries (ed.) (2008). Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter.
    Nietzsche's Critique of Staticism Manuel Dries Part 1: Time, History, Method Nietzsche's Cultural Criticism and his Historical Methodology 23 Andrea Orsucci Thucydides, Nietzsche, and Williams 35 Raymond Geuss The Late Nietzsche's Fundamental Critique of Historical Scholarship 51 Thomas H. Brobjer Part II: Genealogy, Time, Becoming Nietzsche's Timely Genealogy: An Exercise in Anti-Reductionist Naturalism 63 Tinneke Beeckman From Kantian Temporality to Nietzschean Naturalism 75 R. Kevin Hill Nietzsche's Problem of the Past 87 John Richardson Towards Adualism: Becoming and (...)
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  50.  8
    Arnold I. Davidson (1987). How to Do the History of Psychoanalysis: A Reading of Freud's "Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality". Critical Inquiry 13 (2):252-277.
    I have two primary aims in the following paper, aims that are inextricably intertwined. First, I want to raise some historiographical and epistemological issues about how to write the history of psychoanalysis. Although they arise quite generally in the history of science, these issues have a special status and urgency when the domain is the history of psychoanalysis. Second, in light of the epistemological and methodological orientation that I am going to advocate, I want to begin a (...)
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