Search results for 'Genetic Engineering ethics' (try it on Scholar)

  1. Roberta M. Berry (2007). The Ethics of Genetic Engineering. Routledge.
    Genetic engineering: past and present as prelude to the future -- Utilitarianism and engineering to maximize welfare -- Deontology: engineering at the edges of disease, disability, difference, and death -- Virtue ethics and engineering for the virtues -- Genetic engineering, fractious problems, and a navigational approach to policymaking.
     
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  2. Thomas A. Shannon (1997). Made in Whose Image?: Genetic Engineering and Christian Ethics. Humanities Press.
     
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  3. S. Matthew Liao (2008). Selecting Children: The Ethics of Reproductive Genetic Engineering. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):973-991.
    Advances in reproductive genetic engineering have the potential to transform human lives. Not only do they promise to allow us to select children free of diseases, they can also enable us to select children with desirable traits. In this paper, I consider two clusters of arguments for the moral permissibility of reproductive genetic engineering, what I call the Perfectionist View and the Libertarian View; and two clusters of arguments against reproductive genetic engineering, what I (...)
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  4.  36
    Ilhan Ilkilic & Rainer Brömer (2009). Michael J. Sandel: The Case Against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 1 (2):183-185.
    Michael J. Sandel: The Case Against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 183-185 DOI 10.1007/s12376-009-0018-4 Authors Ilhan Ilkilic, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz Medical Center Institute for History, Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine Am Pulverturm 13 55131 Mainz Germany Rainer Brömer, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz Medical Center Institute for History, Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine Am Pulverturm 13 55131 Mainz Germany Journal Medicine Studies Online ISSN 1876-4541 (...)
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  5. Roberta M. Berry (2007). The Ethics of Genetic Engineering. Routledge.
    Human genetic engineering may soon be possible. The gathering debate about this prospect already threatens to become mired in irresolvable disagreement. After surveying the scientific and technological developments that have brought us to this pass, _The Ethics of Genetic Engineering_ focuses on the ethical and policy debate, noting the deep divide that separates proponents and opponents. The book locates the source of this divide in differing framing assumptions: reductionist pluralist on one side, holist communitarian on the (...)
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  6. Roberta M. Berry (2007). The Ethics of Genetic Engineering. Routledge.
    Human genetic engineering may soon be possible. The gathering debate about this prospect already threatens to become mired in irresolvable disagreement. After surveying the scientific and technological developments that have brought us to this pass, _The Ethics of Genetic Engineering_ focuses on the ethical and policy debate, noting the deep divide that separates proponents and opponents. The book locates the source of this divide in differing framing assumptions: reductionist pluralist on one side, holist communitarian on the (...)
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  7.  33
    S. Matthew Liao (2005). The Ethics of Using Genetic Engineering for Sex Selection. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):116-118.
    It is quite probable that one will soon be able to use genetic engineering to select the gender of one’s child by directly manipulating the sex of an embryo. Some might think that this method would be a more ethical method of sex selection than present technologies such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), since, unlike PGD, it does not need to create and destroy “wrong-gendered” embryos. This paper argues that those who object to present technologies on the (...)
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  8.  99
    S. Matthew Liao (2005). The Ethics of Using Genetic Engineering for Sex Selection. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):116-118.
    It is quite probable that one will soon be able to use genetic engineering to select the gender of one’s child by directly manipulating the sex of an embryo. Some might think that this method would be a more ethical method of sex selection than present technologies such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), since, unlike PGD, it does not need to create and destroy “wrong-gendered” embryos. This paper argues that those who object to present technologies on the (...)
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  9.  16
    S. Matthew Liao (2005). The Ethics of Using Genetic Engineering for Sex Selection. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):116-118.
    It is quite likely that parents will soon be able to use genetic engineering to select the sex of their child by directly manipulating the sex of an embryo. Some might think that this method would be a more ethical method of sex selection than present technologies such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) because, unlike PGD, it does not need to create and destroy “wrong gendered” embryos. This paper argues that those who object to present technologies on (...)
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  10.  14
    Andrew Dobson (1997). Genetic Engineering and Environmental Ethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (2):205-.
    When God gave humankind dominion over the earth he may not have known exactly what we would be able to do with it. The technical capacities to which the production and reproduction of our everyday life have given rise have grown at an astonishing and, it seems, ever-increasing rate. The instruments that we use to do work on the world have become sharper and more refined, and the implications of human interventions in the nonhuman environment are much more far-reaching than (...)
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  11.  51
    Louis Marx Hall, The Ethics of Using Genetic Engineering for Sex Selection.
    It is quite probable that one will soon be able to use genetic engineering to select the gender of one’s child by directly manipulating the sex of an embryo. Some might think that this method would be a more ethical method of sex selection than present technologies such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), since, unlike PGD, it does not need to create and destroy “wrong-gendered” embryos. This paper argues that those who object to present technologies on the (...)
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  12.  6
    R. De Vries (2006). Ethical Concepts Regarding the Genetic Engineering of Laboratory Animals. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (2):211-225.
    Intrinsic value and animal integrity are two key concepts in the debate on the ethics of the genetic engineering of laboratory animals. These concepts have, on the one hand, a theoretical origin and are, on the other hand, based on the moral beliefs of people not directly involved in the genetic modification of animals. This ‘external’ origin raises the question whether these concepts need to be adjusted or extended when confronted with the moral experiences and opinions (...)
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  13.  49
    Paul B. Thompson (1997). Ethics and the Genetic Engineering of Food Animals. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (1):1-23.
    Biotechnology applied to traditional foodanimals raises ethical issues in three distinctcategories. First are a series of issues that arise inthe transformation of pigs, sheep, cattle and otherdomesticated farm animals for purposes that deviatesubstantially from food production, including forxenotransplantation or production of pharmaceuticals.Ethical analysis of these issues must draw upon theresources of medical ethics; categorizing them asagricultural biotechnologies is misleading. The secondseries of issues relate to animal welfare. Althoughone can stipulate a number of different philosophicalfoundations for the ethical assessment of (...)
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  14. Rodney Taylor (2010). The Case Against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 14 (1):39-40.
     
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  15.  2
    Ulrich Kortner (2001). The Challenge of Genetic Engineering to Medical Anthropology and Ethics. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 7 (1):21.
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  16.  47
    Eva M. Buccioni (1998). Michael J. Reiss and Roger Straughan, Improving Nature? The Science and Ethics of Genetic Engineering. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 11 (1):49-55.
  17.  52
    Corey McCall (2010). Michael J. Sandel, the Case Against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (2):241-245.
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  18.  31
    T. Chappell (1997). Improving Nature? The Science and Ethics of Genetic Engineering. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (5):329-331.
  19.  7
    Clifton P. Flynn (2011). Review For Our Children: The Ethics of Animal Experimentation in the Age of Genetic Engineering Nordgren Anders Rodopi Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (2):230-232.
  20.  1
    Candace Cummins Gauthier (2002). Michael Boylan, Ph. D., is Professor of Philosophy at Marymount University. He is the Author or Editor of ten Books in Philosophy, Including Genetic Engineering: Science and Ethics on the New Frontier. Additionally, He has Pub-Lished More Than 60 Articles on the Philosophy of Science, Ancient Philosophy, Ethics, and Literary Theory. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11:214-215.
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  21. Michael Reiss (1999). What Sort of People Do We Want? The Ethics of Changing People Through Genetic Engineering. Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 13 (1):63-92.
     
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  22. Massimo Pigliucci (2013). Getting a Rise Out of Genetic Engineering. In John Huss (ed.), Planet of the Apes and Philosophy: Great Apes Think Alike. Open Court
    What makes humans different from other animals, what humans are entitled to do to other species, whether time travel is possible, what limits should be placed on science and technology, the morality and practicality of genetic engineering—these are just some of the philosophical problems raised by Planet of the Apes. Planet of the Apes and Philosophy looks at all the deeper issues involved in the Planet of the Apes stories. It covers the entire franchise, from Pierre Boulle’s 1963 (...)
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  23.  1
    Abidemi Ologunde & Oyinlola Adeyanju (forthcoming). The Ethics of Pharming: Engineering Design at the Genetic Level. Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine: An International Journal.
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  24.  4
    Michael Jonathan Reiss & Roger Straughan (2000). [Book Review] Improving Nature?, The Science and Ethics of Genetic Engineering. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 30 (2):41-43.
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  25.  23
    Rev Nicanor Austriaco (2001). Genetic Engineering, Post-Genomic Ethics, and the Catholic Tradition. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 1 (4):497-506.
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  26.  10
    Marilyn E. Coors (2006). Considering Chimeras: The Confluence of Genetic Engineering and Ethics. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 6 (1):75-87.
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  27.  40
    Andrew Sneddon (2005). Rawlsian Decisionmaking and Genetic Engineering. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (1):35-41.
    This paper evaluates Sara Goering’s recent attempt to use the Rawlsian notion of the veil of ignorance as a tool for distinguishing permissible from impermissible forms of genetic engineering. I argue that her article fails due to a failure to include vital contextual information in the right way.
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  28.  10
    Brian Balmer (1999). Improving Nature? The Science and Ethics of Genetic Engineering, by Michael J. Reiss and Roger Straughan; Birth to Death: Science and Bioethics, Edited by David C. Thomasma and Thomasine Kushner. [REVIEW] Minerva 37 (1):95-97.
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  29.  30
    Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2009). The Case Against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering. [REVIEW] American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (4):636-639.
  30.  9
    Brian G. Henning (2011). The Case Against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering, Michael J. Sandel The Case Against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering Sandel Michael J. Belknap of Harvard UP, Cambridge. [REVIEW] The Pluralist 6 (2):110-114.
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  31.  6
    Brian G. Henning (2011). The Case Against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering, Michael J. Sandel. [REVIEW] The Pluralist 6 (2):110-114.
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  32.  18
    Emy Lucassen (1996). The Ethics of Genetic Engineering. Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (1):51-62.
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  33.  15
    Erica K. Rangel (2010). Review of Roberta M. Berry, The Ethics of Genetic Engineering. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 10 (11):34-35.
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  34.  2
    Jane Maienschein (2009). Heredity and Hope: The Case for Genetic ScreeningBabies by Design: The Ethics of Genetic ChoiceThe Case Against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 100:134-136.
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  35.  4
    Brian G. Henning (2011). The Case Against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering (Review). [REVIEW] The Pluralist 6 (2):110-114.
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  36.  8
    Sheldon Krimsky (2009). Review of Roberta M. Berry, The Ethics of Genetic Engineering. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (5).
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  37.  2
    Daniel Loewe (2010). Reseña de "the Case Against Perfection. Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering" de Michael J. Sandel. Signos Filosóficos 12 (23):207-212.
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  38. Jane Maienschein (2009). Ruth Schwartz Cowan.Heredity and Hope: The Case for Genetic Screening. 292 Pp., Illus., Figs., Index. Cambridge, Mass./London: Harvard University Press, 2008. $27.95 .Ronald M. Green.Babies by Design: The Ethics of Genetic Choice. 288 Pp., Illus., Index. New Haven, Conn./London: Yale University Press, 2007. $26 .Michael J. Sandel.The Case Against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering. X + 162 Pp., Index. Cambridge, Mass./London: Harvard University Press, 2007. $18.95. [REVIEW] Isis 100 (1):134-136.
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  39. T. Van Willigenburg (1998). Improving Nature? The Science and Ethics of Genetic Engineering. Journal of Applied Philosophy 15:116-118.
     
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  40.  28
    Chris Gyngell (2012). Enhancing the Species: Genetic Engineering Technologies and Human Persistence. Philosophy and Technology 25 (4):495-512.
    Many of the existing ethical analyses of genetic engineering technologies (GET) focus on how they can be used to enhance individuals—to improve individual well-being, health and cognition. There is a gap in the current literature about the specific ways enhancement technologies could be used to improve our populations and species, viewed as a whole. In this paper, I explore how GET may be used to enhance the species through improvements in the gene pool. I argue one aspect of (...)
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  41.  20
    Traci Warkentin (2006). Dis/Integrating Animals: Ethical Dimensions of the Genetic Engineering of Animals for Human Consumption. [REVIEW] AI and Society 20 (1):82-102.
    Research at the intersections of feminism, biology and philosophy provides dynamic starting grounds for this discussion of genetic technologies and animals. With a focus on animal bodies, I will examine moral implications of the genetic engineering of “domesticated” animals—primarily pigs and chickens—for the purposes of human consumption. Concepts of natural and artificial, contamination and purity, integrity and fragmentation and mind and body will feature in the discussion. In this respect, Margaret Atwood’s novel, Oryx and Crake, serves as (...)
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  42.  30
    Robert A. Paoletti (1974). Selected Readings: Genetic Engineering and Bioethics. New York,Mss Information Corp..
    Social Values and Research in Human Embryology ROBERT G. EDWARDS and DAVID J. SHARP E 125 Babies by Means of In Vitro Fertilization: Unethical Experiments ...
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  43.  52
    Grzegorz Bugajak (2004). Theology and Genetic Engineering: New Incarnation of the Old Conflict? In Ulf Görman, Willem B. Drees & Hubert Meisinger (eds.), Studies in Science and Theology, vol. 9(2003–2004), Lunds Universitet, Lund. 127–143.
    It is widely acknowledged among science˗and˗theology thinkers – or at least desired – that we have left behind the era of conflict between science and religion. An approach which avoids conflict by pointing out that science and religion employ two different methodologies and therefore occupy two separate magisteria, is, however, unsatisfactory for both – the advocates of a fruitful dialogue between these two realms of human activity as well as the most vigorous opponents of possible conciliation, and the latter still (...)
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  44.  10
    Andrew Dobson (1995). Biocentrism and Genetic Engineering. Environmental Values 4 (3):227-239.
    I consider the contribution that a biocentric perspective might make to the ethical debate concerning the practice of genetic engineering. I claim that genetic engineering itself raises novel ethical questions, and particularly so when confronted with biocentric sensibilities. I outline the nature of these questions and describe the biocentric basis for them. I suggest that fundamentalist opposition to projects of genetic engineering is unhelpful, but that biocentric claims should now be a feature of ethical (...)
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  45.  79
    Rob De Vries (2006). Genetic Engineering and the Integrity of Animals. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (5):469-493.
    Genetic engineering evokes a number of objections that are not directed at the negative effects the technique might have on the health and welfare of the modified animals. The concept of animal integrity is often invoked to articulate these kind of objections. Moreover, in reaction to the advent of genetic engineering, the concept has been extended from the level of the individual animal to the level of the genome and of the species. However, the concept of (...)
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  46.  93
    Philipp Balzer, Klaus Peter Rippe & Peter Schaber (2000). Two Concepts of Dignity for Humans and Non-Human Organisms in the Context of Genetic Engineering. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 13 (1):7-27.
    The 1992 incorporation of an article by referendum in the SwissConstitution mandating that the federal government issue regulations onthe use of genetic material that take into account the dignity ofnonhuman organism raises philosophical questions about how we shouldunderstand what is meant by ``the dignity of nonhuman animals,'' andabout what sort of moral demands arise from recognizing this dignitywith respect to their genetic engineering. The first step in determiningwhat is meant is to clarify the difference between dignity when (...)
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  47.  44
    Anders Melin (2004). Genetic Engineering and the Moral Status of Non-Human Species. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (6):479-495.
    Genetic modification leads to several important moral issues. Up until now they have mainly been discussed from the viewpoint that only individual living beings, above all animals, are morally considerable. The standpoint that also collective entities such as species belong to the moral sphere have seldom been taken into account in a more thorough way, although it is advocated by several important environmental ethicists. The main purpose of this article is to analyze in more detail than often has been (...)
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  48.  66
    Maurizio G. Paoletti & David Pimentel (2000). Environmental Risks of Pesticides Versus Genetic Engineering for Agricultural Pest Control. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 12 (3):279-303.
    Despite the application of 2.5 million tons ofpesticides worldwide, more than 40% of all potentialfood production is lost to insect, weed, and plantpathogen pests prior to harvest. After harvest, anadditional 20% of food is lost to another group ofpests. The use of pesticides for pest control resultsin an estimated 26 million human poisonings, with220,000 fatalities, annually worldwide. In the UnitedStates, the environmental and public health costs forthe recommended use of pesticides total approximately$9 billion/yr. Thus, there is a need for alternativenon-chemical (...)
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  49.  45
    Marko Ahteensuu (2012). Assumptions of the Deficit Model Type of Thinking: Ignorance, Attitudes, and Science Communication in the Debate on Genetic Engineering in Agriculture. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):295-313.
    This paper spells out and discusses four assumptions of the deficit model type of thinking. The assumptions are: First, the public is ignorant of science. Second, the public has negative attitudes towards (specific instances of) science and technology. Third, ignorance is at the root of these negative attitudes. Fourth, the public’s knowledge deficit can be remedied by one-way science communication from scientists to citizens. It is argued that there is nothing wrong with ignorance-based explanations per se. Ignorance accounts at least (...)
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  50.  30
    Christian J. Peters (2000). Genetic Engineering in Agriculture: Who Stands to Benefit? [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 13 (3-4):313-327.
    The use of genetic engineering inagriculture has been the source of much debate. Todate, arguments have focused most strongly on thepotential human health risks, the flow of geneticmaterial to related species, and ecologicalconsequences. Little attention appears to have beengiven to a more fundamental concern, namely, who willbe the beneficiaries of this technology?Given the prevalence of chronic hunger and thestark economics of farming, it is arguable thatfarmers and the hungry should be the mainbeneficiaries of agricultural research. However, theapplication of (...)
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