Search results for 'Genetic psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ash Gobar (1968). Philosophic Foundations Of Genetic Psychology And Gestalt Psychology. Martinus Nilboff.score: 198.0
     
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  2. Richard F. Kitchener (1985). Genetic Epistemology, History of Science and Genetic Psychology. Synthese 65 (1):3 - 31.score: 180.0
    Genetic epistemology analyzes the growth of knowledge both in the individual person (genetic psychology) and in the socio-historical realm (the history of science). But what the relationship is between the history of science and genetic psychology remains unclear. The biogenetic law that ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny is inadequate as a characterization of the relation. A critical examination of Piaget's Introduction à l'Épistémologie Généntique indicates these are several examples of what I call stage laws common to both (...)
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  3. Robert M. Yerkes (1917). Behaviorism and Genetic Psychology. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 14 (6):154-160.score: 156.0
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  4. J. Piaget (1953). Genetic Psychology and Epistemology. Diogenes 1 (1):49-63.score: 150.0
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  5. Jason W. Brown (2005). Genetic Psychology and Process Philosophy. Process Studies 34 (1):33-44.score: 150.0
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  6. Catherine Driscoll (forthcoming). Constructive Criticism: An Evaluation of Buller and Hardcastle's Genetic and Neuroscientific Arguments Against Evolutionary Psychology. Philosophical Psychology:1-19.score: 150.0
    Constructive Criticism: An evaluation of Buller and Hardcastle’s genetic and neuroscientific arguments against Evolutionary Psychology. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/09515089.2013.785068.
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  7. R. F. Rattray (1931). An Outline of Genetic Psychology: According to the Theory of Inherited Mind. Philosophy 6 (23):347 - 364.score: 150.0
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  8. Margaret Floy Washburn (1904). The Genetic Method in Psychology. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 1 (18):491-494.score: 126.0
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  9. Richard F. Kitchener (1996). Genetic Epistemology and Cognitive Psychology of Science. In William T. O'Donohue & Richard F. Kitchener (eds.), The Philosophy of Psychology. Sage Publications. 66.score: 126.0
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  10. O. Kinberg (1941). The Conception of Environment in Genetic Bio-Psychology. Theoria 7 (1):1-19.score: 120.0
  11. Marko Barendregt (2003). Genetic Explanation in Psychology. Journal of Mind and Behavior 24 (1):67-90.score: 120.0
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  12. Alex B. Neitzke (2012). On the Genetic Modification of Psychology, Personality, and Behavior. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (4):307-343.score: 120.0
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  13. Matthew C. Keller & Geoffrey Miller (2006). Resolving the Paradox of Common, Harmful, Heritable Mental Disorders: Which Evolutionary Genetic Models Work Best? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):385-404.score: 78.0
    Given that natural selection is so powerful at optimizing complex adaptations, why does it seem unable to eliminate genes (susceptibility alleles) that predispose to common, harmful, heritable mental disorders, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder? We assess three leading explanations for this apparent paradox from evolutionary genetic theory: (1) ancestral neutrality (susceptibility alleles were not harmful among ancestors), (2) balancing selection (susceptibility alleles sometimes increased fitness), and (3) polygenic mutation-selection balance (mental disorders reflect the inevitable mutational load on the (...)
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  14. Jacques Montangero (1985). Genetic Epistemology: Yesterday and Today. Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York.score: 78.0
     
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  15. Richard Rojcewicz & Brian Lutgens (1996). A Genetic (Psychological) Phenomenology of Perception. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 27 (2):117-145.score: 76.0
  16. Adam Hochman (2013). The Phylogeny Fallacy and the Ontogeny Fallacy. Biology and Philosophy 28 (4):593-612.score: 72.0
    In 1990 Robert Lickliter and Thomas Berry identified the phylogeny fallacy, an empirically untenable dichotomy between proximate and evolutionary causation, which locates proximate causes in the decoding of ‘genetic programs’, and evolutionary causes in the historical events that shaped these programs. More recently, Lickliter and Hunter Honeycutt (Psychol Bull 129:819–835, 2003a) argued that Evolutionary Psychologists commit this fallacy, and they proposed an alternative research program for evolutionary psychology. For these authors the phylogeny fallacy is the proximate/evolutionary distinction itself, (...)
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  17. Nicholas Shea (2012). Genetic Representation Explains the Cluster of Innateness-Related Properties. Mind and Language 27 (4):466-493.score: 66.0
    The concept of innateness is used to make inferences between various better-understood properties, like developmental canalization, evolutionary adaptation, heritability, species-typicality, and so on (‘innateness-related properties’). This article uses a recently-developed account of the representational content carried by inheritance systems like the genome to explain why innateness-related properties cluster together, especially in non-human organisms. Although inferences between innateness-related properties are deductively invalid, and lead to false conclusions in many actual cases, where some aspect of a phenotypic trait develops in reliance on (...)
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  18. Marko Barendregt & René Van Hezewijk (2005). Adaptive and Genomic Explanations of Human Behaviour: Might Evolutionary Psychology Contribute to Behavioural Genomics? [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (1):57-78.score: 66.0
    . Evolutionary psychology and behavioural genomics are both approaches to explain human behaviour from a genetic point of view. Nonetheless, thus far the development of these disciplines is anything but interdependent. This paper examines the question whether evolutionary psychology can contribute to behavioural genomics. Firstly, a possible inconsistency between the two approaches is reviewed, viz. that evolutionary psychology focuses on the universal human nature and disregards the genetic variation studied by behavioural genomics. Secondly, we will (...)
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  19. Ian Burkitt (1999). Bodies of Thought: Embodiment, Identity, and Modernity. Sage Publications.score: 66.0
    `The work develops and articulates a brilliant and original central thesis; namely that modern individuals are best understood as complex bodies of thought, as embodied symbolic and material beings. Future work on mind, self, body, society and culture will have to begin with Burkitt's text' - Norman K. Denzin, University of Illinois `After his excellent Social Selves, Ian Burkitt has produced a new theory of embodiment which will become required reading for those working in the areas of social theory, sociology, (...)
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  20. J. Glover (1988). I: The Philosophy and Psychology of Personal Identity. Penguin.score: 66.0
    This book relates work in neuroscience, psychology and psychiatry to questions about what a person is and the nature of a persons unity across a lifetime. The neuropsychiatry is now dated. The philosophy has three themes still perhaps of interest. The first is a response to Derek Parfits powerful and influential work on personal identity, which, like many other people, I discussed with him as he worked it out. I accept his view that there is no ego that owns (...)
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  21. Birger Siebert (2005). Prospects for a Cultural-Historical Psychology of Intelligence. Studies in East European Thought 57 (3-4):305 - 317.score: 66.0
    The ideas of cultural-historical psychology have led to a new understanding of the human psyche as developing in the process of the subject acting in social and historical contexts. Such a “non-classical” reinterpretation of psychological concepts should be based on a theoretical and philosophical framework in order to explain genetic sources of these concepts. For this purpose, Il’enkov’s philosophy is of great significance. This is illustrated by discussing a possible cultural-historical understanding of the concept of intelligence.
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  22. N. Humphrey (1992/1999). A History of the Mind: Evolution and the Birth of Consciousness. Simon and Schuster.score: 60.0
    This book is a tour-de-force on how human consciousness may have evolved. From the "phantom pain" experienced by people who have lost their limbs to the uncanny faculty of "blindsight," Humphrey argues that raw sensations are central to all conscious states and that consciousness must have evolved, just like all other mental faculties, over time from our ancestorsodily responses to pain and pleasure. '.
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  23. Richard F. Kitchener (1987). Is Genetic Epistemology Possible? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 38 (3):283-299.score: 60.0
    Several philosophers have questioned the possibility of a genetic epistemology, an epistemology concerned with the developmental transitions between successive states of knowledge in the individual person. Since most arguments against the possibility of a genetic epistemology crucially depend upon a sharp distinction between the genesis of an idea and its justification, I argue that current philosophy of science raises serious questions about the universal validity of this distinction. Then I discuss several senses of the genetic fallacy, indicating (...)
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  24. John Dupré (2001). Human Nature and the Limits of Science. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    John Dupre warns that our understanding of human nature is being distorted by two faulty and harmful forms of pseudo-scientific thinking. Not just in the academic world but in everyday life, we find one set of experts who seek to explain the ends at which humans aim in terms of evolutionary theory, while the other set uses economic models to give rules of how we act to achieve those ends. Dupre demonstrates that these theorists' explanations do not work and that, (...)
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  25. Liliana Albertazzi (2013). Dissecting Intentionality in the Lab: Meinong's Theory. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 23 (3):579-596.score: 60.0
    Besides presenting a phenomenological-experimental analysis of consciousness, Meinong challenged one of the major indisputable axioms of current scientific research, i.e. that perception in awareness has to be veridical on the stimulus. Meinong’s analysis of consciousness, which he conducted through a kind of dissection of its structures from a systematic and an experimental viewpoint, offers relevant insights to contemporary consciousness studies.
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  26. Nicholas Humphrey (1984). Consciousness Regained: Chapters in the Development of Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Essays discuss the evolution of consciousness, self-knowledge, aesthetics, religious ecstasy, ghosts, and dreams.
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  27. Leonard Carmichael (1956). The Making of Modern Mind. Houston, Elsevier Press.score: 60.0
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  28. Kishor Gandhi (ed.) (1983/1986). The Evolution of Consciousness. Paragon House.score: 60.0
  29. Jeremy Griffith (1991). Beyond the Human Condition. Foundation for Humanity's Adulthood.score: 60.0
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  30. Jeremy Griffith (1988). Free: The End of the Human Condition: The Biological Reason Why Humans Have Had to Be Individual, Competitive, Egocentric, and Aggressive. Centre for Humanity's Adulthood.score: 60.0
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  31. George G. [from old catalog] Haydu (1958). The Architecture of Sanity. New York, Julian Press.score: 60.0
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  32. John J. Pauson (1966). Beyond Morality and the Law. Pittsburgh, Philosophical Press.score: 60.0
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  33. Dov Fox, Silver Spoons and Golden Genes: Genetic Engineering and the Egalitarian Ethos.score: 54.0
    This Article considers the moral and legal status of practices that aim to modify traits in human offspring. As advancements in reproductive biotechnology give parents greater power to shape the genetic constitution of their children, an emerging school of legal scholars has ushered in a privatized paradigm of genetic control. Commentators defend a constitutionally protected right to prenatal engineering by appeal to the significance of procreative liberty and the promise of producing future generations who are more likely to (...)
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  34. Slobodan Perovic & Ljiljana Radenovic, Is Nativism in Psychology Reconcilable with the Parity Thesis in Biology?score: 54.0
    The Modern Synthesis of Darwinism and genetics regards non-genetic factors as merely constraints on the genetic variations that result in the characteristics of organisms. Even though the environment (including social interactions and culture) is as necessary as genes in terms of selection and inheritance, it does not contain the information that controls the development of the traits. S. Oyama’s account of the Parity Thesis, however, states that one cannot conceivably distinguish in a meaningful way between nature-based (i.e., gene-based) (...)
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  35. Pierre Vermersch (2004). Attention Between Phenomenology and Experimental Psychology. Continental Philosophy Review 37 (1):45-81.score: 54.0
    It is possible to consider attention as the modulating dimension of consciousness. Understood in this sense, attention can be a privileged theme for relating the first person point of view (conceived as a psycho-phenomenology inspired by the work of Husserl) to the experimental sciences (e.g. psychology, neuropsychology, etc.), which have done a great deal of work on attention. This article will take up in succession some different points of view regarding the status of attention and its structure (e.g. static (...)
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  36. Peter Godfrey-Smith, Innateness and Genetic Information.score: 54.0
    The idea that innateness can be understood in terms of genetic coding or genetic programming is discussed. I argue that biology does not provide any support for the view that the whole-organism features of interest to nativists in psychology and linguistics are genetically coded for. This provides some support for recent critical and deflationary treatments of the concept of innateness.
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  37. Thomas Kesselring (1994). A Comparison Between Evolutionary and Genetic Epistemology Or: Jean Piaget's Contribution to a Post-Darwinian Epistemology. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 25 (2):293 - 325.score: 54.0
    The viewpoint of Evolutionary Epistemology (EE) and of Genetic Epistemology (GE) on classical epistemological questions is strikingly different: EE starts with Evolutionary Biology, the subject of which is population's dynamics. GE, however, starts with Developmental Psychology and thus focusses the development of individuals. By EE knowledge is seen as portraying or copying process, and truth is interpreted as a product of adaptation, whereas for GE knowledge is due to a construction process in which the production of true insights (...)
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  38. Clifford Sosis (2014). Hedonic Possibilities and Heritability Statistics. Philosophical Psychology 27 (5):681-702.score: 54.0
  39. Nicholas Shea (2012). New Thinking, Innateness and Inherited Representation. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 367:2234-2244.score: 54.0
    The New Thinking contained in this volume rejects an Evolutionary Psychology that is committed to innate domain-specific psychological mechanisms: gene-based adaptations that are unlearnt, developmentally fixed and culturally universal. But the New Thinking does not simply deny the importance of innate psychological traits. The problem runs deeper: the concept of innateness is not suited to distinguishing between the two positions. That points to a more serious problem with the concept of innateness as it is applied to human psychological phenotypes. (...)
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  40. Nestor Micheli Morales (2009). Psychological and Ideological Aspects of Human Cloning: A Transition to a Transhumanist Psychology. Journal of Evolution and Technology 20.score: 54.0
    The prospect of replication of human beings through genetic manipulation has engendered one of the most controversial debates about reproduction in our society. Ideology is clearly influencing the direction of research and legislation on human cloning, which may present one of the greatest existential challenges to the meaning of creation. In this article, I argue that, in view of the possibility that human cloning and other emerging technologies could enhance physical and cognitive abilities, there is a need for a (...)
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  41. Carmelo M. Vicario, Mark J. Yates & Michael E. R. Nicholls (2013). Shared Deficits in Space, Time, and Quantity Processing in Childhood Genetic Disorders. Frontiers in Psychology 4:43-1.score: 54.0
    Shared deficits in space, time, and quantity processing in childhood genetic disorders.
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  42. M. S. Egorova (forthcoming). Behavior Genetics: Psychological Aspect. М. Logos.score: 50.0
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  43. David S. Moore (2008). Espousing Interactions and Fielding Reactions: Addressing Laypeople's Beliefs About Genetic Determinism. Philosophical Psychology 21 (3):331 – 348.score: 48.0
    Although biologists and philosophers of science generally agree that genes cannot determine the forms of biological and psychological traits, students, journalists, politicians, and other members of the general public nonetheless continue to embrace genetic determinism. This article identifies some of the concerns typically raised by individuals when they first encounter the systems perspective that biologists and philosophers of science now favor over genetic determinism, and uses arguments informed by that perspective to address those concerns. No definitive statements can (...)
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  44. C. Daniel Batson (2010). The Naked Emperor: Seeking a More Plausible Genetic Basis for Psychological Altruism. Economics and Philosophy 26 (2):149-164.score: 48.0
    The adequacy of currently popular accounts of the genetic basis for psychological altruism, including inclusive fitness (kin selection), reciprocal altruism, sociality, and group selection, is questioned. Problems exist both with the evidence cited as supporting these accounts and with the relevance of the accounts to what is being explained. Based on the empathy-altruism hypothesis, a more plausible account is proposed: generalized parental nurturance. It is suggested that four evolutionary developments combined to provide a genetic basis for psychological altruism. (...)
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  45. Osborne P. Wiggins Jr (1979). Merleau-Ponty and Piaget: An Essay in Philosophical Psychology. [REVIEW] Man and World 12 (1):21-34.score: 48.0
    Merleau-ponty's phenomenology of the intentional arc uniting body and world is viewed as grounded in the meaningfulness and materiality of both. the genetic constitution of the interrelated meaning and physicality of body and world is sketched in a phenomenological interpretation of jean piaget's ``the origin of intelligence in children''. from this sketch emerges an assertion of the priority of action over perception in prepredicative experience.
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  46. Gary Kose & Gary Fireman (2000). Postmodern Readings of Piaget's Genetic Epistemology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (1):52-60.score: 48.0
  47. B. F. Riess (1946). Genetic Changes in Semantic Conditioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 36 (2):143.score: 48.0
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  48. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2006). Genetic Epistemology and Piaget's Philosophy of Science: Piaget Vs. Kuhn on Scientific Progress. Theory and Psychology 16 (2):203-224.score: 42.0
    This paper concerns Jean Piaget's (1896–1980) philosophy of science and, in particular, the picture of scientific development suggested by his theory of genetic epistemology. The aims of the paper are threefold: (1) to examine genetic epistemology as a theory concerning the growth of knowledge both in the individual and in science; (2) to explicate Piaget's view of ‘scientific progress’, which is grounded in his theory of equilibration; and (3) to juxtapose Piaget's notion of progress with Thomas Kuhn's (1922–1996). (...)
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  49. Huib L. de Jong (2002). Levels of Explanation in Biological Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 15 (4):441-462.score: 42.0
    Until recently, the notions of function and multiple realization were supposed to save the autonomy of psychological explanations. Furthermore, the concept of supervenience presumably allows both dependence of mind on brain and non-reducibility of mind to brain, reconciling materialism with an independent explanatory role for mental and functional concepts and explanations. Eliminativism is often seen as the main or only alternative to such autonomy. It gladly accepts abandoning or thoroughly reconstructing the psychological level, and considers reduction if successful as equivalent (...)
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  50. Colin Martindale (1999). Genetic and Biological Determinants of Psychological Traits. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):897-898.score: 42.0
    Rose seems to be arguing against an extreme ultra-Darwinism that probably has no adherents. He incorrectly argues that a number of psychological traits are very difficult to measure. This is not the case. Rose argues that intelligence has no biological correlates. In fact, it is correlated with brain size, EEG evoked potentials, and cerebral glucose uptake during problem solving. Data that Rose should be aware of are omitted when they do not fit the case he is trying to make.
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