Search results for 'Genocide Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Roth (2010). Easy to Remember?: Genocide and the Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1):31-42.score: 150.0
    Philosophers of religion have written a great deal about the problem of evil. Their reflections, however, have not concentrated, at least not extensively or sufficiently, on the particularities of evil that manifest themselves in genocide. Concentrating on some of those particularities, this essay reflects on genocide, which has sometimes been called the crime of crimes, to raise questions such as: how should genocide affect the philosophy of religion and what might philosophers of religion contribute to help (...)
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  2. David Patterson (2012). Genocide in Jewish Thought. Cambridge University Press.score: 102.0
    1. Introduction: a name, not an essence -- 2. Why Jewish thought and what makes it Jewish? -- 3. Deadly philosophical abstraction -- 4. The stranger in your midst -- 5. Nefesh: the soul as flesh and blood -- 6. The environmentalist contribution to genocide -- 7. Torture -- 8. Hunger and homelessness -- 9. Philosophy, religion, and genocide -- 10. A concluding reflection on body and soul.
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  3. John K. Roth (ed.) (2005). Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 102.0
    Genocide is evil or nothing could be. It raises a host of questions about humanity, rights, justice, and reality, which are key areas of concern for philosophy. Strangely, however, philosophers have tended to ignore genocide. Even more problematic, philosophy and philosophers bear more responsibility for genocide than they have usually admitted. In Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide, an international group of twenty-five contemporary philosophers work to correct those deficiencies by showing how (...) can and should repsond to genocide, particularly in ways that defend human rights. (shrink)
     
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  4. Michael Freeman (1991). Speaking About the Unspeakable: Genocide and Philosophy. Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (1):3-18.score: 78.0
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  5. Raimond Gaita (2011). Literature, Genocide, and the Philosophy of International Law. In Rowan Cruft, Matthew H. Kramer & Mark R. Reiff (eds.), Crime, Punishment, and Responsibility: The Jurisprudence of Antony Duff. Oup Oxford.score: 72.0
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  6. William C. Bradford (2006). Acknowledging and Rectifying the Genocide of American Indians: "Why is It That They Carry Their Lives on Their Fingernails?". Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):515–543.score: 66.0
  7. Josh Cohen (2003). Interrupting Auschwitz: Art, Religion, Philosophy. Continuum.score: 66.0
    The interrupted absolute : art, religion and the "new categorical imperative" -- "The ever-broken promise of happiness" : interrupting art, or Adorno -- "Absolute insomnia" : interrupting religion, or Levinas -- "To preserve the question" : interrupting the book, or Jabès -- Conclusion : sharing the imperative.
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  8. Daniel R. Brunstetter (2012). Tensions of Modernity: Las Casas and His Legacy in the French Enlightenment. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Modernity and the other: a story of inequality -- Locating the other in the political debates of early modernity -- Thinking and rethinking the equality of the other: Vitoria, Sepúlveda and the true barbarians -- Las Casas and the other: the tension between equality and cultural othercide -- From the civilizing mission to irreconcilable alterity: the changing perception of the Indians in the French Enlightenment -- The other side of modernity: legitimizing the transition from cultural othercide to physical othercide -- (...)
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  9. James R. Watson (ed.) (2010). Metacide: In the Pursuit of Excellence. Rodopi.score: 60.0
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  10. Ditte Marie Munch‐Jurišić (2014). Perpetrator Abhorrence: Disgust as a Stop Sign. Metaphilosophy 45 (2):270-287.score: 54.0
    Most contemporary research on disgust can be divided into “disgust advocates” and “disgust skeptics.” The so-called advocates argue that disgust can have a positive influence on our moral judgment; skeptics warn that it can mislead us toward prejudice and discrimination. This article compares this disagreement to a structurally similar debate in the field of genocide studies concerning the phenomenon of “perpetrator abhorrence.” While some soldiers report having felt strong disgust in the moment of committing or witnessing atrocity, scholars disagree (...)
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  11. Alan Wolfe (2011). Political Evil: What It is and How to Combat It. A.A. Knopf.score: 54.0
    The distinctiveness of political evil -- Widespread evil within -- Unrelenting evil without -- The misuses of appeasement -- Democracy's terrorism problem -- The case against dramatizing genocide -- Ethnic cleaning's seductive attractions -- The politics of counter-evil.
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  12. Sandu Frunza (2010). Inexprimabilul: cu Elie Wiesel despre filosofie si teologie/ The Unspeakable: With Elie Wiesel on Philosophy and Theology. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (19):3-29.score: 54.0
    Of the representatives of the Romanian Diaspora, Elie Wiesel is the figure that has the widest public recognition, as a human rights activist and also as a writer. Due to the fundamental themes that he develops, his thinking is claimed both by philosophers and theologians. Wiesel says that with the experience of the Holocaust, all the categories that mold human creation must be rethought from the perspective of the Unspeakable of this extreme experience. Starting with this experience, the post-Holocaust (...) must help us ask questions and find answers regarding human reason in extreme conditions, to mold the plan of action and human responsibility, to speak of the human condition in a world where God is absent. For Wiesel, theology must be oriented towards community and the needs of individuals. It has to be a theology of otherness, in the sense that it must sustain the idea of the fulfillment of the individual in his relation to the other. Wiesel chooses literary discourse to express philosophical and theological ideas. It seems to him that this type of discourse can express the magnitude of the genocide perpetrated against the European Jews more adequately than other disciplines. (shrink)
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  13. Richard Kamber (2000). The Logic of the Goldhagen Debate. Res Publica 6 (2):155-177.score: 48.0
    Since Daniel J. Goldhagen's Hitler's Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaustattempts to show that the Holocaust is explicable and can be understood largely in terms of a single cause, “eliminationist anti-Semitism”, it is not surprising that the book has generated an international debate. What is surprising is the magnitude and emotional intensity of the debate. This article argues that the deepest flaws in it Hitler's Willing Executioners,as well as the chasm of disagreement between Goldhagen's detractors and defenders, have as (...)
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  14. Philip Cafaro (2004). Fashionable Nihilism: A Critique of Analytic Philosophy (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (3):257-260.score: 48.0
    Blurb: Thoreau wrote that we have professors of philosophy but no philosophers. Can't we have both? Why doesn't philosophy hold a more central place in our lives? Why should it? Eloquently opposing the analytic thrust of philosophy in academia, noted pluralist philosopher Bruce Wilshire answers these questions and more in an effort to make philosophy more meaningful to our everyday lives. Writing in an accessible style he resurrects classic yet neglected forms of inquiring and communicating. In (...)
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  15. Paolo Bernardini, Diego Lucci & Gadi Luzzatto Voghera (eds.) (2006). La Memoria Del Male: Percorsi Tra Gli Stermini Del Novecento E Il Loro Ricordo. Cleup.score: 48.0
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  16. Paul Ricœur (2004). Memory, History, Forgetting. University of Chicago Press.score: 36.0
    Why do major historical events such as the Holocaust occupy the forefront of the collective consciousness, while profound moments such as the Armenian genocide, the McCarthy era, and France's role in North Africa stand distantly behind? Is it possible that history "overly remembers" some events at the expense of others? A landmark work in philosophy, Paul Ricoeur's Memory, History, Forgetting examines this reciprocal relationship between remembering and forgetting, showing how it affects both the perception of historical experience and (...)
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  17. Leonard Lawlor (2006). The Implications of Immanence: Toward a New Concept of Life. Fordham University Press.score: 36.0
    The Implications of Immanence develops a philosophy of life in opposition to the notion of “bio-power,” which reduces the human to the question of power over what Giorgio Agamben terms “bare life,” mere biological existence. Breaking with all biologism or vitalism, Lawlor attends to the dispersion of death at the heart of life, in the “minuscule hiatus” that divides the living present, separating lived experience from the living body and, crucially for phenomenology, inserting a blind spot into a visual (...)
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  18. Leszek Kołakowski (2005). My Correct Views on Everything. St. Augustine's Press.score: 36.0
    My correct views on everything -- The Marxist roots of Stalinism -- The myth of human self-identity -- What is socialism? -- Totalitarianism and the virtue of the lie -- Communism as a cultural force -- What is left of socialism? -- The heritage of the left -- Genocide and ideology -- The devil in history : interview with George Urban -- A layman pronounces on the catechism -- Jesus Christ : prophet and reformer -- "Leibniz and Job" -- (...)
     
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  19. Christian Perring (2012). Claudia Card , Confronting Evils: Terrorism, Torture, Genocide . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 32 (4):247-248.score: 36.0
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  20. Arne Johan Vetlesen (1998). Impartiality and Evil: A Reconsideration Provoked by Genocide in Bosnia. Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (5):1-35.score: 30.0
    Confronted with Adolf Eichmann, evildoer par excellence, Hannah Arendt sought in vain for any 'depth' to the evil he had wrought. How is the philosopher to approach evil ? Is the celebrated criterion of impartiality ill-equipped to guide judgment when its object is evil - as exhibited, for instance, in the recent genocide in Bosnia? This essay questions the ability of the neutral 'third party' to respond adequately to evil from a standpoint of avowed impartiality. Discussing the different roles (...)
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  21. Andrew Altman (2012). Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity: Dispelling the Conceptual Fog. Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (1):280-308.score: 30.0
    Genocide and crimes against humanity are among the core crimes of international law, but they also carry great moral resonance due to their indissoluble link to the atrocities of the Nazi regime and to other egregious episodes of mass violence. However, the concepts of genocide and crimes against humanity are not well understood, even by the international lawyers and jurists who are most concerned with them. A conceptual fog hovers around the discussion of these two categories of crime. (...)
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  22. Seumas Miller (1998). Collective Responsibility, Armed Intervention and the Rwandan Genocide. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (2):223-238.score: 30.0
    In this paper I explore the notion of collective moral responsibility as it pertains both to nation-states contemplating humanitarian armed intervention in international social conflicts, and as it pertains to social groups perpetrating human rights violations in such conflicts. I take the Rwandan genocide as illustrative of such conflicts and make use of it accordingly. I offer an individualist account of collective moral responsibility, according to which collective moral responsibility is a species of joint responsibility.
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  23. V. V. Pavlovskiy (2008). Modern Globalization and Antiglobalization. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:579-584.score: 30.0
    A modern stage of globalization is a historical and logical continuation of “an economical social formation” (K.G. Marx), a civilization (L.G. Morgan). The analysis of this globalization in philosophy and social sciences has an extremely contradictory character which is law-governed in the modern society. Modern globalization has been showing itself as a qualitatively new historical process since 1991. Judging from the positions of the dialectical materialistic theory of history (K.G. Marx, F. Engels, V.I. Lenin and others) it by its (...)
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  24. Calvin O. Schrag (2006). Otherness and the Problem of Evil: How Does That Which Is Other Become Evil? [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):149 - 156.score: 24.0
    In seeking to answer the question "How does that which is other become evil?" the author provides a discussion of four entwined aspects of the issue at stake: (1) difficulty in achieving clarity on the grammar of evil; (2) genocide as a striking illustration of otherness becoming evil; (3) the challenge of postnationalism as a resource for dealing with otherness in the socio-political arena; and (4) the ethico-religious dimension as it relates to the wider problem of evil.
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  25. Steven P. Lee (2010). The Moral Distinctiveness of Genocide. Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (3):335-356.score: 24.0
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  26. Michael H. Hoffheimer (2001). Hegel, Race, Genocide. Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (S1):35-62.score: 24.0
  27. Andrew Gordon Fiala (2005). Get 'Em All! Kill 'Em! Genocide, Terrorism, Righteous Communities (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (4):262-265.score: 24.0
  28. Richard Vernon (2011). Larry May: Genocide: A Normative Account. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (3):399-404.score: 24.0
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  29. Stephen Nathanson (2012). Claudia Card, Confronting Evils: Terrorism, Torture, Genocide. Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (4):600-602.score: 24.0
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  30. Jeffrey Reiman (2012). Confronting Evils: Terrorism, Torture, Genocide, by Claudia Card. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010, Xix + 329 Pp. ISBN 9780521899611 Hb £60; ISBN 9780521728362 Pb £19.99. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 20 (3):512-517.score: 24.0
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  31. E. V. Boisaubin (1987). Robert Jay Lifton: 1986 The Nazi Doctors: Medical Killing and the Psychology of Genocide, Basic Books, Inc., New York, 561 Pp. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (3):305-307.score: 24.0
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  32. Ronald J. Glossop (1990). Preventing Nuclear Genocide. Social Philosophy Today 3:443-445.score: 24.0
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  33. Gary A. Mullen (2006). Genocide and the Politics of Identity. Philosophy Today 50 (Supplement):170-175.score: 24.0
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  34. Francis Dupuis-Déri & Arnold L. Farr (2013). And Economics, with a Concentration in Globalization, at the University of Pennsylvania, and She Recently Studied English at King's College in London. She is Interested in Human Rights and Genocide Studies. She is the Associate Editor of “Critical Refusals,” the 2013 Double Special Issue of the Radical Phi. Radical Philosophy Review 16 (2):679-683.score: 24.0
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  35. Michael Eldridge (2005). Get'Em All! Kill'Em! Genocide, Terrorism, Righteous Communities. Bruce Wilshire. Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books, 2004. 272 Pp. $24.95 Hc 0-7391-0873-5. Genocide is One of the Deepest Problems for Human Thought. What We Discover in Genocide is the Omnipresent Negativity of Every Human Aspiration. What We. [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (4).score: 24.0
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  36. Corbin Fowler (1989). George H. Hampsch, Preventing Nuclear Genocide: Essays On Peace and War Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 9 (6):229-231.score: 24.0
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  37. Gordon Graham (2001). Evil and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Genocide in Rwanda, multiple murder at Denver or Dunblane, the gruesome activities of serial killers - what makes these great evils, and why do they occur? In addressing such questions this book, unusually, interconnects contemporary moral philosophy with recent work in New Testament scholarship. The conclusions to emerge are surprising. Gordon Graham argues that the inability of modernist thought to account satisfactorily for evil and its occurrence should not lead us to embrace an eclectic postmodernism, but to take (...)
     
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  38. Annabel Herzog (2002). Reporting and Storytelling: Eichmann in Jerusalem as Political Testimony. Thesis Eleven 69 (1):83-98.score: 24.0
    Commentaries on Eichmann in Jerusalem are of two kinds. The first confronts the historical relevance of Arendt's `report' and attempts to ascertain whether her ironical presentation of Eichmann's trial matches reality, namely, the incommensurable suffering of the Jewish people. The second focuses on the meaning of her expression `the banality of evil', and places Arendt in a long tradition of moral and political philosophy concerned with the problem of evil and, accordingly, of judging evil. The argument of this paper (...)
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  39. P. Hockenos (forthcoming). Michael A. Sells, The Bridge Betrayed: Religion and Genocide in Bosnia. Radical Philosophy.score: 24.0
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  40. Graham Hubbs (2014). Some Varieties of Pragmatism. In Graham Hubbs Douglas Lind (ed.), Pragmatism, Law, and Language. Routledge. 1-13.score: 24.0
    This essay introduces the volume in which it is found. It explains how the essays of the volume belong to a single vista, one that ranges from metaethics to political philosophy, from a discussion of Hegelian recognition to an analysis of the Rwandan genocide. It articulates this explanation in terms of a variety of pragmatisms. The taxonomy it develops draws on Robert Brandom's recent discussions of pragmatism.
     
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  41. Joanna Kyriakakis (forthcoming). Rene Provost and Payam Akhavan: Confronting Genocide. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-8.score: 24.0
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  42. Larry May (2010). Identifying Groups in Genocide Cases. In Larry May & Zachary Hoskins (eds.), International Criminal Law and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
     
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  43. Nancy Potter (ed.) (2006). Trauma, Truth and Reconciliation: Healing Damaged Relationships. OUP Oxford.score: 24.0
    People do great wrongs to each other all the time, sometimes deliberately, sometimes accidentally. Many within the fields of mental health are centrally involved in helping people to heal from traumatic events and to come to terms with wrongs done to them by others. However, there is surprisingly little in the way of guidance, few texts that situate healing from trauma or evildoing within a combined political and philosophical context. This book looks at how people, communities, and nations can address (...)
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  44. Abigail L. Rosenthal (1991). Berel Lang, Act and Idea in the Nazi Genocide Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 11 (2):113-115.score: 24.0
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  45. Henry C. Theriault (2010). Rousseau, Plato, and Western Philosophy's Anti-Genocidal Strain. In James R. Watson (ed.), Metacide: In the Pursuit of Excellence. Rodopi.score: 24.0
  46. Eric Dietrich (2011). There Is No Progress in Philosophy. Essays in Philosophy 12 (2):9.score: 21.0
    Except for a patina of twenty-first century modernity, in the form of logic and language, philosophy is exactly the same now as it ever was; it has made no progress whatsoever. We philosophers wrestle with the exact same problems the Pre-Socratics wrestled with. Even more outrageous than this claim, though, is the blatant denial of its obvious truth by many practicing philosophers. The No-Progress view is explored and argued for here. Its denial is diagnosed as a form of anosognosia, (...)
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  47. Babette E. Babich (2003). On the Analytic-Continental Divide in Philosophy : Nietzsche's Lying Truth, Heidegger's Speaking Language, and Philosophy. In C. G. Prado (ed.), A House Divided: Comparing Analytic and Continental Philosophy. Humanity Books.score: 21.0
    On the political nature of the analytic - continental distinction in professional philosophy and the general tendency to discredit continental philosophy while redesignating the rubric as analytically conceived.
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  48. Lydia Patton (2010). Review: Makkreel and Luft (Eds), Neo-Kantianism in Contemporary Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 30 (4):280-282.score: 21.0
    A volume dealing seriously with the influence of the major schools of Neo-Kantian thought on contemporary philosophy has been needed sorely for some time. But this volume of essays aims higher: it 'is published in the hopes that it will secure Neo-Kantianism a significant place in contemporary philosophical discussions' (Introduction, 1). The aim of the book, then, is partly to provide a history of major Neo-Kantian thinkers and their influence, and partly to argue for their importance in contemporary (continental) (...)
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