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  1. Geoffrey K. Pullum (2013). Consigning Phenomena to Performance: A Response to Neeleman. Mind and Language 28 (4):532-537.
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  2. Geoffrey K. Pullum (2013). The Central Question in Comparative Syntactic Metatheory. Mind and Language 28 (4):492-521.
    Two kinds of theoretical framework for syntax are encountered in current linguistics. One emerged from the mathematization of proof theory, and is referred to here as generative-enumerative syntax (GES). A less explored alternative stems from the semantic side of logic, and is here called model-theoretic syntax (MTS). I sketch the outlines of each, and give a capsule summary of some mathematical results pertaining to the latter. I then briefly survey some diverse types of evidence suggesting that in some ways MTS (...)
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  3. Geoffrey K. Pullum (2011). On the Mathematical Foundations of Syntactic Structures. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 20 (3):277-296.
    Chomsky’s highly influential Syntactic Structures ( SS ) has been much praised its originality, explicitness, and relevance for subsequent cognitive science. Such claims are greatly overstated. SS contains no proof that English is beyond the power of finite state description (it is not clear that Chomsky ever gave a sound mathematical argument for that claim). The approach advocated by SS springs directly out of the work of the mathematical logician Emil Post on formalizing proof, but few linguists are aware of (...)
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  4. James Rogers & Geoffrey K. Pullum (2011). Aural Pattern Recognition Experiments and the Subregular Hierarchy. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 20 (3):329-342.
    We explore the formal foundations of recent studies comparing aural pattern recognition capabilities of populations of human and non-human animals. To date, these experiments have focused on the boundary between the Regular and Context-Free stringsets. We argue that experiments directed at distinguishing capabilities with respect to the Subregular Hierarchy, which subdivides the class of Regular stringsets, are likely to provide better evidence about the distinctions between the cognitive mechanisms of humans and those of other species. Moreover, the classes of the (...)
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  5. Geoffrey K. Pullum & Barbara C. Scholz (2009). For Universals (but Not Finite-State Learning) Visit the Zoo. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):466-467.
    Evans & Levinson's (E&L's) major point is that human languages are intriguingly diverse rather than (like animal communication systems) uniform within the species. This does not establish a about language universals, or advance the ill-framed pseudo-debate over universal grammar. The target article does, however, repeat a troublesome myth about Fitch and Hauser's (2004) work on pattern learning in cotton-top tamarins.
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  6. Geoffrey K. Pullum & Kyle Rawlins (2007). Argument or No Argument? Linguistics and Philosophy 30 (2):277 - 287.
    We examine an argument for the non-context-freeness of English that has received virtually no discussion in the literature. It is based on adjuncts of the form ‘X or no X’, where X is a nominal. The construction has been held to exemplify unbounded syntactic reduplication. We argue that although the argument can be made in a mathematically valid form, its empirical basis is not claimed unbounded syntactic identity between nominals does not always hold in attested cases, and second, an understanding (...)
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  7. Barbara C. Scholz & Geoffrey K. Pullum (2006). Irrational Nativist Exuberance. In Robert J. Stainton (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science. Malden MA: Blackwell Publishing. 59--80.
  8. Nameera Akhtar, Maureen Callanan, Geoffrey K. Pullum & Barbara C. Scholz (2004). Learning Antecedents for Anaphoric One. Cognition 93 (2):141-145.
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  9. Jun Yamada, Min Wang, Keiko Koda, Charles A. Perfetti, Michael Tomasello, Nameera Akhtar, Maureen Callanan, Geoffrey K. Pullum, Barbara C. Scholz & Terry Regier (2004). An L1-Script-Transfer-Effect Fallacy. Discussion. Authors' Replies. Cognition 93 (2):127-165.
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  10. Geoffrey K. Pullum (2002). Empirical Assessment of Stimulus Poverty Arguments. Linguistic Review.
  11. Barbara C. Scholz, Francis Jeffry Pelletier & Geoffrey K. Pullum (2000). Philosophy and Linguistics. Dialogue 39 (3):605-607.
    Philosophy of linguistics is the philosophy of science as applied to linguistics. This differentiates it sharply from the philosophy of language, traditionally concerned with matters of meaning and reference.
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  12. Geoffrey K. Pullum (1996). Learnability, Hyperlearning, and the Poverty of the Stimulus. In J. Johnson, M. L. Juge & J. L. Moxley (eds.), Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Meeting: General Session and Parasession on the Role of Learnability in Grammatical Theory. Berkeley, California: Berkeley Linguistics Society. 498-513.
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  13. Geoffrey K. Pullum (1993). Affirmative Action and the University. Teaching Philosophy 16 (4):366-369.
  14. Chris Barker & Geoffrey K. Pullum (1990). A Theory of Command Relations. Linguistics and Philosophy 13 (1):1 - 34.
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  15. Geoffrey K. Pullum (1987). Natural Language Interfaces and Strategic Computing. AI and Society 1 (1):47-58.
    Modern weaponry is often too complex for unaided human operation, and is largely or totally controlled by computers. But modern software, particularly artificial intelligence software, exhibits such complexity and inscrutability that there are grave dangers associated with its use in non-benign applications. Recent efforts to make computer systems more accessible to military personnel through natural language processing systems, as proposed in the Strategic Computing Initiative of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, increases rather than decreases the dangers of unpredictable behavior. (...)
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  16. Geoffrey K. Pullum (1983). CL Baker and John J. McCarthy, Eds., The Logical Problem of Language Acquisition Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 3 (2):49-51.
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  17. Geoffrey K. Pullum & Gerald Gazdar (1982). Natural Languages and Context-Free Languages. Linguistics and Philosophy 4 (4):471 - 504.
    Notice that this paper has not claimed that all natural languages are CFL's. What it has shown is that every published argument purporting to demonstrate the non-context-freeness of some natural language is invalid, either formally or empirically or both.18 Whether non-context-free characteristics can be found in the stringset of some natural language remains an open question, just as it was a quarter century ago.Whether the question is ultimately answered in the negative or the affirmative, there will be interesting further questions (...)
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