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Profile: Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
  1. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord, Contemporary Contractarian Moral Theory.
    Contractarianism, as a general approach to moral and political thought, has perspective I offer, however, is not scrupulously historical. I smooth over a good deal of the twists and turns that due care to the historical record would had a long and distinguished history -- its roots are easily traced as far back as..
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  2. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord, Desires…and Beliefs…of One's Own.
    Much work in recent moral psychology attempts to spell out what it is for a desire to be an agent’s own, or, as it is often put, what it means for an agent to be identified with certain of her desires rather than others. The aim of such work varies. Some suggest that an account of what it is for a desire to be an agent’s own provides us with an account of what it is for an agent to value (...)
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  3. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord, On the Relevance of Ignorance to the Demands of Morality.
    In Morality, Bernard Gert argues that the fundamental demands of morality are well articulated by ten distinct, and relatively simple, rules. These rules, he holds, are such that any person, no matter what her circumstances or interests, would be rational in accepting, and guiding her choices by, them. The rules themselves are comfortably familiar (e.g. “Do not kill,” “Do not deceive,” “Keep your promises”) and sit well as intuitively plausible. Yet the rules are not, Gert argues, to be accepted merely (...)
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  4. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord & Michael A. Smith, Desires and Beliefs of One's Own.
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  5. Michael Smith & Geoffrey Sayre-McCord, Desires…and Beliefs…of One's Own.
    Much work in recent moral psychology attempts to spell out what it is for a desire to be an agent’s own, or, as it is often put, what it means for an agent to be identified with certain of her desires rather than others. The aim of such work varies. Some suggest that an account of what it is for a desire to be an agent’s own provides us with an account of what it is for an agent to value (...)
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  6. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (2013). Hume and Smith on Sympathy, Approbation, and Moral Judgment. Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):208-236.
    David Hume and Adam Smith are usually, and understandably, seen as developing very similar sentimentalist accounts of moral thought and practice. As similar as Hume's and Smith's accounts of moral thought are, they differ in telling ways. This essay is an attempt primarily to get clear on the important differences. They are worth identifying and exploring, in part, because of the great extent to which Hume and Smith share not just an overall approach to moral theory but also a conception (...)
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  7. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (2010). Moral Skepticism. In Sven Bernecker & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Routledge Companion to Epistemology. New York: Routledge. 464.
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  8. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (2008). Hume on Practical Morality and Inert Reason. In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics: Volume Iii. Oup Oxford.
  9. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (2001). Criminal Justice and Legal Reparations as an Alternative to Punishment. Noûs 35 (s1):502 - 529.
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  10. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (2001). Mill's “Proof” of the Principle of Utility: A More Than Half-Hearted Defense. Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (02):330-.
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  11. R. G. Frey, Brad Hooker, F. M. Kamm, Thomas E. Hill Jr, Geoffrey Sayre-McCord, David McNaughton, Jan Narveson, Michael Slote, Alison M. Jaggar & William R. Schroeder (2000). Normative Ethics. In Hugh LaFollette - (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell Publishers.
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  12. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (2000). Contractarianism. In Hugh LaFollette - (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell Publishers. 247--267.
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  13. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (2000). Chapter L3 Contractarianism. In Hugh LaFollette - (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell Publishers. 247.
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  14. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1997). Different Kinds of Kind Terms: A Reply to Sosa and Kim. Philosophical Issues 8:313-323.
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  15. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1997). 'Good' on Twin Earth. Philosophical Issues 8:267-292.
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  16. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1997). Hume's Representation Argument Against Rationalism. Manuscrito 20:77.
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  17. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1997). The Metaethical Problem. Ethics 108 (1):55-83.
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  18. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1996). Coherentist Epistemology and Moral Theory. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Mark Timmons (eds.), Moral Knowledge? New Readings in Moral Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    matter of knowing that -- that injustice is wrong, courage is valuable, and care is As a result, what I'll be doing is primarily defending in general -- and due. Such knowledge is embodied in a range of capacities, abilities, and skills..
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  19. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1995). Hume and the Bauhaus Theory of Ethics. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 20 (1):280-298.
    Appeals to utility permeate Hume's account of morality. He maintains, for which have this tendency to the public advantage and loss" (T. 578-79).
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  20. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1994). On Why Hume's “General Point of View” Isn't Ideal–and Shouldn't Be. Social Philosophy and Policy 11 (01):202-228.
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  21. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1992). Normative Explanations. Philosophical Perspectives 6:55-71.
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  22. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1991). Being a Realist About Relativism (in Ethics). Philosophical Studies 61 (1-2):155-176.
    How should a moral realist respond to the (seemingly) abundant evidence diversity provides for relativism? Many think there is only one reasonable response: abandon moral realism. Against them, I argue that moral realists can stand their ground in the face of moral diversity without relying on excessively optimistic arguments or unrealistic assumptions. In the process, I defend two theses: (i) that, far from being incompatible with moral realism, many plausible versions of relativism are _versions of moral realism; and (ii) the (...)
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  23. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1989). Book Review:The Natural Philosophy of Leibniz K. Okruhlik, J. Brown. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 56 (1):173-.
  24. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1989). Deception and Reasons to Be Moral. American Philosophical Quarterly 26 (2):113 - 122.
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  25. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1989). Functional Explanations and Reasons as Causes. Philosophical Perspectives 3:137-164.
    If we assume that a conceptual connection does hold between reasons and action, the arguments for both theses are strikingly simple. In defense of the first thesis, all that need be added is Hume's Principle: between cause and effect only a (logically) contingent relation holds. For given Hume's Principle, and the conceptual connection (which after all is not a contingent one), it follows that no causal connection holds. In defense of the second thesis, all that need be added is one (...)
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  26. Geoffrey Sayre-Mccord (1988). Moral Theory and Explanatory Impotence. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 12 (1):433-457.
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  27. Geoffrey Sayre-Mccord (1988). David M. Estlund. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (4).
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  28. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (ed.) (1988). Essays on Moral Realism. Cornell University Press.
    Introduction The Many Moral Realisms Geoffrey Sayre-McCord I. Introduction Recognizing the startling resurgence in realism, ...
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  29. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1988). Moral Theory and Explanatory Impotence In: Sayre-McCord, G. Ed. In , Essays on Moral Realism. Cornell University Press. 256--281.
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  30. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1986). Deontic Logic and the Priority of Moral Theory. Noûs 20 (2):179-197.
  31. Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (1986). The Many Moral Realisms. Southern Journal of Philosophy 24 (S1):1-22.
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