Search results for 'Geographical myths' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Dmitry Sergeyevich Merezhkovsky (1971). Atlantis/Europe: The Secret of the West. Blauvelt, N.Y.,R. Steiner Publications.score: 60.0
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  2. B. Riffenburgh (2000). John Style The Myth of the Explorer, The Press, Sensationalism and Geographical Discovery. The European Legacy 5 (1):144-144.score: 50.0
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  3. J. Style (1999). The Myth of the Explorer: The Press, Sensationalism and Geographical Discovery. By Beau Riffenburgh. The European Legacy 4:118-118.score: 50.0
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  4. Paul J. Cloke & R. J. Johnston (eds.) (2005). Spaces of Geographical Thought: Deconstructing Human Geography's Binaries. Sage Publications.score: 24.0
    Spaces of Geographical Thought examines key ideas – like space and place - which inform the geographic imagination. The text: discusses the core conceptual vocabulary of human geography: agency: structure; state: society; culture: economy; space: place; black: white; man: woman; nature: culture; local: global; and time: space; explains the significance of these binaries in the constitution of geographic thought; and shows how many of these binaries have been interrogated and re-imagined in more recent geographical thinking. A consideration of (...)
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  5. Derek Sayer (2012). Crossed Wires on the Prague-Paris Surrealist Telephone. Common Knowledge 18 (2):193-207.score: 24.0
    An exercise in humour noir, this essay explores relations between the Paris and Prague surrealist groups from André Breton and Paul Éluard's visit to “the magic capital of old Europe” in 1935 to the aborted “Prague Spring” of 1968. It focuses on the famous “starry castle” of Breton's Mad Love — which Czechs know better as Letohrádek Hvězda at Bílá hora, the White Mountain — as a signifier whose wanderings, over the period, encapsulate the mutual myths and misunderstandings that (...)
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  6. Barry Smith & David M. Mark (2001). Geographical Categories: An Ontological Investigation. International Journal of Geographical Information Science 15 (7):591–612.score: 21.0
    This paper reports the results of a series of experiments designed to establish how non-expert subjects conceptualize geospatial phenomena. Subjects were asked to give examples of geographical categories in response to a series of differently phrased elicitations. The results yield an ontology of geographical categories—a catalogue of the prime geospatial concepts and categories shared in common by human subjects independently of their exposure to scientific geography. When combined with nouns such as feature and object, the adjective geographic elicited (...)
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  7. James J. Gibson & Janet Cornsweet (1952). The Perceived Slant of Visual Surfaces—Optical and Geographical. Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (1):11.score: 21.0
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  8. Max M. Louwerse & Rolf A. Zwaan (2009). Language Encodes Geographical Information. Cognitive Science 33 (1):51-73.score: 21.0
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  9. Javier Martínez-del-Río & José Céspedes-Lorente (forthcoming). Competitiveness and Legitimation: The Logic of Companies Going Green in Geographical Clusters. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 21.0
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  10. Mary Midgley (2003/2011). The Myths We Live By. Routledge.score: 20.0
    Mary Midgley argues in her powerful new book that far from being the opposite of science, myth is a central part of it. In brilliant prose, she claims that myths are neither lies nor mere stories but a network of powerful symbols that suggest particular ways of interpreting the world.
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  11. Kevin Schilbrack (ed.) (2002). Thinking Through Myths: Philosophical Perspectives. Routledge.score: 20.0
    Myths disclose alternative worlds. From the perspective of modern philosophy, the belief in mythic worlds was seen as an aspect of culture that was soon to be superseded. But what is the place of myths, after modernity? Mythical Thinking brings together essays that use the philosophical tools- including phenomenology, metaphysics, semiotics and moral philosophy- to study these worlds and to think through myths.
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  12. Sven Ove Hansson, Seven Myths of Risk.score: 18.0
    The purpose of this presentation is to introduce both the concept of risk and the precautionary principle, that is a major policy principle in present-day risk management. Since risk has been the subject of many misconceptions I will do this in large part by criticizing seven views on risk that I believe to have caused considerable confusion both among scientists and policy-makers. But before looking at the seven myths of risk, let us begin with the basic issue of defining (...)
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  13. Daniel C. Dennett, Memes: Myths, Misunderstandings and Misgivings.score: 18.0
    When one says that cultures evolve, this can be taken as a truism, or as asserting one or another controversial, speculative, unconfirmed theory. Consider a cultural inventory at time t: it includes all the languages, practices, ceremonies, edifices, methods, tools, myths, music, art, and so forth, that compose a culture. Over time, the inventory changes. Some items disappear, some multiply, some merge, some change. (When I say some change, I mean to be neutral at this point about whether this (...)
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  14. Arash Abizadeh (2004). Historical Truth, National Myths and Liberal Democracy: On the Coherence of Liberal Nationalism. Journal of Political Philosophy 12 (3):291–313.score: 18.0
    The claim that liberal democratic normative commitments are compatible with nationalism is challenged by the widely acknowledged fact that national identities invariably depend on historical myths: the nationalist defence of such publicly shared myths is in tension with liberal democratic theory’s commitment to norms of publicity, public justification, and freedom of expression. Recent liberal nationalist efforts to meet this challenge by justifying national myths on liberal democratic grounds fail to distinguish adequately between different senses of myth. Once (...)
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  15. James Franklin, Myths About the Middle Ages.score: 18.0
    There are so many myths about the Middle Ages, it has to be suspected that the general level of "knowledge" about things medieval is actually negative. Here are some of the more famous ones.
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  16. E. Wicks (2012). Challenging Some Myths About the Right to Life at the End of Life. 2: Reinstating the Ethically Excluded. Clinical Ethics 7 (1):24-27.score: 18.0
    This article continues the rejection of certain myths about the right to life at the end of life commenced in an article in the previous issue of the journal Clinical Ethics. It focuses upon ethical arguments that seek to exclude two categories of human beings from the usual protection of human life: those described as ‘non-persons’ and those ‘designated for death’. The article argues that, while the protection offered to life by means of the right to life is far (...)
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  17. Gyula Klima, Introduction: The “Three Myths”.score: 18.0
    After Brentano, intentionality is often characterized as “the mark of the mental”. In Brentano‟s view, intentionality “is characteristic exclusively of mental phenomena. No physical phenomenon manifests anything like it”. 2 After Meinong, it is also generally believed that intentionality, as this characteristic mental phenomenon, concerns a specific type of objects, namely, intentional objects, having intentional inexistence, as opposed to ordinary physical objects, having real existence. Thus, intentional objects are supposed to constitute a mysterious ontological realm, the dwelling place of the (...)
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  18. Stefan Linquist & Jordan Bartol (2013). Two Myths About Somatic Markers. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (3):455-484.score: 18.0
    Research on patients with damage to ventromedial frontal cortices suggests a key role for emotions in practical decision making. This field of investigation is often associated with Antonio Damasio’s Somatic Marker Hypothesis—a putative account of the mechanism through which autonomic tags guide decision making in typical individuals. Here we discuss two questionable assumptions—or ‘myths’—surrounding the direction and interpretation of this research. First, it is often assumed that there is a single somatic marker hypothesis. As others have noted, however, Damasio’s (...)
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  19. Inder P. Khera (2001). Business Ethics East Vs. West: Myths and Realities. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (1):29 - 39.score: 18.0
    The West has a stereotypical image of businesses, officials, and politicians, etc., in the East (Third World) countries being pervasively corrupt while it views itself as being almost completely uncorrupt. One closer look, however, realities turn out to be quite different. Business corruption is much more universal that Westerners are generally willing to accept. The major differences are that corruption in the East is practiced so blatantly that it makes major news. Western businesses, on the other hand, have, over time, (...)
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  20. Walter Block & Matthew Block (2000). Toward a Universal Libertarian Theory of Gun (Weapon) Control: A Spatial and Geographical Analysis. Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (3):289 – 298.score: 18.0
    The debate over gun control has taken place in complete isolation from geographical considerations. It focuses on, for the most part, whether legalization would bring about more or fewer accidental deaths, and murders of innocents, than prohibition, and in the USA on the precise meaning of the second amendment to the Constitution. However, these deliberations, argue the authors of the present paper, can be enriched by incorporating into them a spatial context. When this is done, and they are combined (...)
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  21. Uskali Mäki & Caterina Marchionni (2009). On the Structure of Explanatory Unification: The Case of Geographical Economics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):185-195.score: 18.0
    A newly emerged field within economics, known as geographical economics claims to have provided a unified approach to the study of spatial agglomerations at different spatial scales by showing how these can be traced back to the same basic economic mechanisms. We analyze this contemporary episode of explanatory unification in relation to major philosophical accounts of unification. In particular, we examine the role of argument patterns in unifying derivations, the role of ontological convictions and mathematical structures in shaping unification, (...)
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  22. David Michael Levin (1976). II. The Concept of Mental Illness: Working Through the Myths. Inquiry 19 (1-4):360-365.score: 18.0
    In ?Some Myths about ?Mental Illness'? (Inquiry, Vol. 18 [1975], No. 3), Michael Moore attempts to clarify and refute what he takes to be the radical (existential) position concerning the nature and diagnosis of mental illness. Moore's dissatisfaction with certain formulations and conceptualizations of the radical position is endorsed; as also the need to introduce greater rigor and precision into the discussion of mental illness. But Moore's clarifications are really misunderstandings and, in consequence, his refutations do not succeed. Moore's (...)
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  23. K. Mitch Hodge (2006). What Myths Reveal About How Humans Think: A Cognitive Approach to Myth. Dissertation, University of Texas Arlingtonscore: 18.0
    This thesis has two main goals: (1) to argue that myths are natural products of human cognition; and (2) that structuralism, as introduced by Claude Levi-Strauss, provides an over-arching theory of myth when supplemented and supported by current research in philosophy of mind, cognitive psychology, and cognitive anthropology. With regard to (1), we argue that myths are naturally produced by the human mind through individuals’ interaction with their natural and social environments. This interaction is constrained by both the (...)
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  24. Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.) (2012). Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill.score: 18.0
    Through the contributions of specialists in the field, this volume addresses the still open question of the role and status of myth in Plato’s dialogues and thereby speaks to the broader problem of the relation between philosophy and ...
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  25. Hrvoje Nikolić (2007). Quantum Mechanics: Myths and Facts. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 37 (11):1563-1611.score: 18.0
    A common understanding of quantum mechanics (QM) among students and practical users is often plagued by a number of “myths”, that is, widely accepted claims on which there is not really a general consensus among experts in foundations of QM. These myths include wave-particle duality, time-energy uncertainty relation, fundamental randomness, the absence of measurement-independent reality, locality of QM, nonlocality of QM, the existence of well-defined relativistic QM, the claims that quantum field theory (QFT) solves the problems of relativistic (...)
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  26. E. Wicks (2011). Challenging Some Myths About the Right to Life at the End of Life. 1: Not an Absolute Right. Clinical Ethics 6 (4):167-171.score: 18.0
    This article, and a related one in the next issue, investigates some myths surrounding the application of the right to life at the end of life. The present article focuses upon the myth that the right to life is an absolute right, always requiring the preservation of life. It identifies three distinct situations in which state authorities may be justified in declining to take intervening action in order to save a life. It argues that the right to life encompasses (...)
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  27. Lorna Gold (2002). Positionality, Worldview and Geographical Research: A Personal Account of a Research Journey. Ethics, Place and Environment 5 (3):223 – 237.score: 18.0
    Much has been written in recent years over the need to disclose the 'positionality' of geographical researchers. At the same time, there is a growing awareness that such positionality, however much disclosed, can never fully express the complexities underpinning a research relationship. This essay explores these issues through a retrospective review of research carried out into the economic geographies of the Economy of Sharing. It argues that the issues surrounding positionality can be much more than a question of hidden (...)
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  28. Barbara V. Nunn (2004). The Myths We Live By. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (2):366.score: 18.0
    Book Information The Myths We Live By. The Myths We Live By Mary Midgley , London: Routledge , 2003 , 175 , US$29.95 ( cloth ) By Mary Midgley. London: Routledge. Pp. 175. US$29.95 (cloth:).
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  29. Luc Brisson (2004). How Philosophers Saved Myths: Allegorical Interpretation and Classical Mythology. University of Chicago Press.score: 18.0
    This study explains how the myths of Greece and Rome were transmitted from antiquity to the Renaissance. Luc Brisson argues that philosophy was ironically responsible for saving myth from historical annihilation. Although philosophy was initially critical of myth because it could not be declared true or false and because it was inferior to argumentation, mythology was progressively reincorporated into philosophy through allegorical exegesis. Brisson shows to what degree allegory was employed among philosophers and how it enabled myth to take (...)
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  30. Juan C. González (2010). On Pink Elephants, Floating Daggers, and Other Philosophical Myths. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (2):193-211.score: 18.0
    Many philosophers and scientists rightly take hallucinations to be phenomena that challenge in a most pressing way our theories of perception and cognition, and epistemology in general. However, very few challenge the received views on the hallucinatory experience and even fewer critically delve into the subject with both breadth and depth. There are all kinds of problems concerning hallucinations—including conceptual, methodological, and empirical issues—that call for a multilevel analysis and an interdisciplinary approach which in turn provide the detail and scope (...)
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  31. Seiko Kitajima (1999). Sponsorship, Academic Independence and Critical Engagement: A Forum on Shell, the Ogoni Dispute and the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers). Philosophy and Geography 2 (2):254 – 256.score: 18.0
    (1999). Sponsorship, academic independence and critical engagement: A forum on shell, the Ogoni dispute and the royal geographical society (with the institute of British geographers) Philosophy & Geography: Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 254-256.
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  32. Plato (2004/2009). Selected Myths. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This volume brings together ten of the most celebrated Platonic myths, from eight of Plato's dialogues ranging from the early Protagoras and Gorgias to the late Timaeus and Critias.
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  33. John R. Carnes (1970). Myths, Bliks, and the Social Contract. Journal of Value Inquiry 4 (2):105-118.score: 18.0
    One conclusion has already been reached, namely, the diagnosis of the problems of Rousseau's political thought. Again, this is not to say that Locke or Hobbes is correct and Rousseau incorrect, but only to observe that one cannot mix myths without getting into the deepest trouble. But there are several other observations of a more general nature that I want to make. First, the considerations introduced above are intended to point out something of the character of the language of (...)
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  34. Kristján Kristjánsson (2013). Ten Myths About Character, Virtue and Virtue Education – Plus Three Well-Founded Misgivings. British Journal of Educational Studies 61 (3):269-287.score: 18.0
    ABSTRACT Initiatives to cultivate character and virtue in moral education at school continue to provoke sceptical responses. Most of those echo familiar misgivings about the notions of character, virtue and education in virtue ? as unclear, redundant, old-fashioned, religious, paternalistic, anti-democratic, conservative, individualistic, relative and situation dependent. I expose those misgivings as ?myths?, while at the same time acknowledging three better-founded historical, methodological and practical concerns about the notions in question.
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  35. Alison Niemi (2003). Film as Religious Experience: Myths and Models in Mass Entertainment. Critical Review 15 (3-4):435-446.score: 18.0
    Abstract Popular film has become a significant venue for meaning?making in modern society. Like religion, film provides models for understanding and behaving within the social world. Like religion, film reinforces this content through emotional resonance. Myths slip under a viewer's intellectual defenses in the non?threatening guise of entertainment. In a mainstream culture skeptical of religion, film presents an alternative mechanism for the transmission and processing of ?religious? ideas and ideals.
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  36. Stephen Brammer, Stephen Pavelin & Lynda Porter (2005). Corporate Social Performance and Geographical Diversification. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:81-86.score: 18.0
    This paper investigates an under-researched relationship, that between corporate social performance (CSP) and geographical diversification. Drawingupon the institutional and stakeholder perspectives and utilising data on a sample of large UK firms, we develop a set of empirical models of CSP, and findevidence of a significant contemporaneous positive relationship between the two for some types of social performance and in some regions of the world. Overall,we provide evidence that firms shape their social performance strategies to their geographical profile.
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  37. Adeniyi Gbadegesin (1999). Sponsorship, Academic Independence and Critical Engagement: A Forum on Shell, the Ogoni Dispute and the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers). Philosophy and Geography 2 (2):252 – 254.score: 18.0
    (1999). Sponsorship, academic independence and critical engagement: A forum on shell, the Ogoni dispute and the royal geographical society (with the institute of British geographers) Philosophy & Geography: Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 252-254.
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  38. Ronald Morris (1997). Myths of Sexuality Education. Journal of Moral Education 26 (3):353-361.score: 18.0
    Abstract This paper suggests that sexuality education needs to take into account the myths by which teachers educate and students learn. Here myth is understood as a narrative, paradigm or vision. The paper does not argue against myth. Rather, it argues that myth or narrative provides a much needed depth dimension to sexuality education. It does argue, however, that the existing myths serve sexuality education poorly. The final section of the paper proposes three narratives which provide rich alternatives (...)
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  39. Judith W. Spain, Peggy Brewer, Virgil Brewer & S. J. Garner (2002). Ethics and Geography –Impact of Geographical Cultural Differences on Students Ethical Decisions. Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):187 - 194.score: 18.0
    An exploratory survey was conducted to determine if there are differences in ethical decisions by business students based upon cultural backgrounds. Students' responses to a vignette concerning advertising of cigar products in a variety of different media provided evidence of significant cultural differences between three groups of students from different geographical locations within the United States. This article suggests that the presumption that an individuals ethical beliefs and behaviors do not change after childhood may be in error.
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  40. Helen Reece (2013). Rape Myths: Is Elite Opinion Right and Popular Opinion Wrong? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (3):445-473.score: 18.0
    England and Wales have recently experienced wide-ranging rape law reform and a galloping rape reporting rate but no comparable increase in rape convictions, leading many erstwhile law reformers to turn attention to attitudes. In essence, their argument is that reform has proved relatively ineffective because a range of agents hold ‘rape myths’. Despite the broad consensus that this approach has attracted, I argue that the regressiveness of current public attitudes towards rape has been overstated. The claim that rape (...) are widespread may be challenged on three grounds: first, some of the attitudes are not myths; secondly, not all the myths are about rape; thirdly, there is little evidence that the rape myths are widespread. To a troubling extent, we are in the process of creating myths about myths. This process functions to close down, not open up, the possibilities of a productive public conversation about important and at times vexed questions. (shrink)
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  41. Gordon Storholm & Hershey Friedman (1989). Perceived Common Myths and Unethical Practices Among Direct Marketing Professionals. Journal of Business Ethics 8 (12):975 - 979.score: 18.0
    Two arcas of continuing interest to direct marketing professionals are the perceived myths and unethical practices in the field. Documentation of specific cases and more abstract discussion of these two points of interest frequently appear in the direct marketing literature (e.g. Gitlitz and Barton, 1983; Lewis, 1982; Pierce, 1985). Indeed, the Direct Marketing Association (DMA) has promulgated specific guidelines (DMA, 1985) for ethical business practices within the industry. Up to this point, however, there has been no attempt at a (...)
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  42. Russell Blackford, SchÜ & Udo Klenk (2013). 50 Great Myths About Atheism. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 18.0
    Tackling a host of myths and prejudices commonly leveled at atheism, this captivating volume bursts with sparkling, eloquent arguments on every page.
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  43. Alessandro Ferrante (forthcoming). New Forms of Unease, Between Myths of Development and Catastrophic Imaginaries: Educational Implications. Governare la Paura. Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies.score: 18.0
    The main aim of this paper is to make some remarks on the educational implications of new forms of unease from a theoretical perspective. I explore new forms of unease related to collective imagination. I focus especially on myths of development and catastrophic imaginaries related to social and environmental crises.
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  44. Stephen L. Gardner (1998). Myths of Freedom: Equality, Modern Thought, and Philosophical Radicalism. Greenwood Press.score: 18.0
    This is reflected, but not always made transparent, Stephen Gardner asserts, in the myths of freedom that govern modern culture and the basic framework of ...
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  45. Michael Paul Kinch (1980). Geographical Distribution and the Origin of Life: The Development of Early Nineteenth-Century British Explanations. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 13 (1):91 - 119.score: 18.0
    By the 1840s and 1850s biogeographical theory had polarized into two opposing views — both of which had their origins in the sixteenth or seventeenth centuries. At issue in this polarization was the question of God's involvement with His creation. At one end of the spectrum were Sclater, Agassiz, Kirby, and others who saw a neatly designed world in which geographical distributions were planned and executed by the hand of God at creation. For most of these naturalists, organisms were (...)
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  46. L. de Heuscb & R. Blohm (1972). Myths and the Convulsions of History. Diogenes 20 (78):64-86.score: 18.0
    Some original forms of state emerge from the clan structures in central Africa in the 16th and 17th centuries, beyond the reach of any European influence. The oral epic traditions which echo these events draw from the founts of Bantu mythic thought. The Luba national epic recounts the dramatic origin of its sacred royalty and describes the passage from a primitive culture to a refined civilization, from an uneventful history to one full of movement; but above all it abandons itself (...)
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  47. Per Lindskog (1999). Sponsorship, Academic Independence and Critical Engagement: A Forum on Shell, the Ogoni Dispute and the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers). Philosophy and Geography 2 (2):248 – 251.score: 18.0
    (1999). Sponsorship, academic independence and critical engagement: A forum on shell, the Ogoni dispute and the royal geographical society (with the institute of British geographers) Philosophy & Geography: Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 248-251.
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  48. Ian Maxey (1999). Sponsorship, Academic Independence and Critical Engagement: A Forum on Shell, the Ogoni Dispute and the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers). Philosophy and Geography 2 (2):242 – 246.score: 18.0
    (1999). Sponsorship, academic independence and critical engagement: A forum on shell, the Ogoni dispute and the royal geographical society (with the institute of British geographers) Philosophy & Geography: Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 242-246.
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  49. Sanjoy Bhattacharya (2003). From Foe to Friend: Geographical and Environmental Factors and the Control and Eradication of Smallpox in India. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (3):299 - 317.score: 18.0
    Due to the highly visible nature of the disease, smallpox received a lot of attention from the colonial and independent Indian governments. An assessment of the changing official views about the impact of geographical and environmental factors on modes of variola causation and control presents insights into themes that are generally ignored in the existing historiography. Rather than being synchronised efforts, imposed top-down, provincial level officials in charge of running vaccination programmes were able to retain a great degree of (...)
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  50. V. Tschudin (1998). Myths, Magic and Reality in Nursing Ethics: A Personal Perspective. Nursing Ethics 5 (1):52-58.score: 18.0
    Ethics, especially in nursing, tends to be surrounded by myths and ideas that have more in common with magic than reality. This article argues from quotes of two medieval men, Thomas Aquinas and Meister Eckhart, that ethical behaviour among nurses is not something difficult or far-fetched, but something immediate, everyday, and often very simple. The more weighty ethical dilemmas are not diminished by this. Aspects of justice, compassion and courage are discussed from the point of view of relationships with (...)
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