Search results for 'Geography Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert Inkpen (2005). Science, Philosophy and Physical Geography. Routledge.score: 78.0
    This accessible and engaging text explores the relationship between philosophy, science and physical geography. It addresses an imbalance that exists in opinion, teaching and to a lesser extent research, between a philosophically enriched human geography and a perceived philosophically ignorant physical geography. Science, Philosophy and Physical Geography , challenges the myth that there is a single self-evident scientific method, that can and is applied in a straightforward manner by physical geographers. It demonstrates the variety (...)
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  2. R. J. Johnston (1986). Philosophy and Human Geography: An Introduction to Contemporary Approaches. E. Arnold.score: 66.0
     
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  3. David M. Smith (1998). Geography and Moral Philosophy: Some Common Ground. Philosophy and Geography 1 (1):7 – 33.score: 60.0
    There is an awakening of interest in links between geography and moral philosophy, or ethics. This paper reviews a range of issues where common ground might be found on this new disciplinary interface. These issues include the historical geography of moralities, the notion of moral geographies, inclusion and exclusion in the context of the bounding of spaces, and the moral significance of distance and proximity, as well as the more familiar concern with social justice. Environmental ethics (...)
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  4. Arild Holt-Jensen (1999). Geography, History and Concepts: A Student's Guide. Sage Publications.score: 51.0
    Totally revised and updated, written especially for students, the third edition of Geography – History and Concepts is the definitive undergraduate introduction to the history, philosophy and methodology of Human Geography. Accessible and comprehensive, the work comprises five sections: - What is Geography?: a historical overview of the discipline and an explanation of its organization - The Foundations of Geography: examines Geography from Antiquity to the early modern period; the discussion includes detailed explanations of (...)
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  5. Benno Werlen (1993). Society Action and Space: An Alternative Human Geography. Routledge.score: 51.0
    What is space? And why are questions of space important to social theory? Society, Action and Space is the first English translation of a book which has been widely recognized in Europe as a major contribution to the interface between geography and social theory. Benno Werlen focuses on the issues which are at the heart of the most important debates in human and social geography today. One of the most significant recent developments in social analysis has been the (...)
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  6. Paul J. Cloke & R. J. Johnston (eds.) (2005). Spaces of Geographical Thought: Deconstructing Human Geography's Binaries. Sage Publications.score: 51.0
    Spaces of Geographical Thought examines key ideas – like space and place - which inform the geographic imagination. The text: discusses the core conceptual vocabulary of human geography: agency: structure; state: society; culture: economy; space: place; black: white; man: woman; nature: culture; local: global; and time: space; explains the significance of these binaries in the constitution of geographic thought; and shows how many of these binaries have been interrogated and re-imagined in more recent geographical thinking. A consideration of these (...)
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  7. J. Pickles (1985). Phenomenology, Science, and Geography: Spatiality and the Human Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 51.0
    A work of outstanding originality and importance, which will become a cornerstone in the philosophy of geography, this book asks: What is human science? Is a truly human science of geography possible? What notions of spatiality adequately describe human spatial experience and behaviour? It sets out to answer these questions through a discussion of the nature of science in the human sciences, and, specifically, of the role of phenomenology in such inquiry. It criticises established understanding of phenomenology (...)
     
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  8. David N. Livingstone & Charles W. J. Withers (eds.) (2005). Geography and Revolution. University of Chicago Press.score: 45.0
    A term with myriad associations, revolution is commonly understood in its intellectual, historical, and sociopolitical contexts. Until now, almost no attention has been paid to revolution and questions of geography. Geography and Revolution examines the ways that place and space matter in a variety of revolutionary situations. David N. Livingstone and Charles W. J. Withers assemble a set of essays that are themselves revolutionary in uncovering not only the geography of revolutions but the role of geography (...)
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  9. Francesca Bordogna (2008). William James at the Boundaries: Philosophy, Science, and the Geography of Knowledge. University of Chicago Press.score: 45.0
    At Columbia University in 1906, William James gave a highly confrontational speech to the American Philosophical Association (APA). He ignored the technical philosophical questions the audience had gathered to discuss and instead addressed the topic of human energy. Tramping on the rules of academic decorum, James invoked the work of amateurs, read testimonials on the benefits of yoga and alcohol, and concluded by urging his listeners to take up this psychological and physiological problem. What was the goal of this unusual (...)
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  10. Antoine Bailly & Lay James Gibson (eds.) (2004). Applied Geography. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 42.0
    Applied Geography, A World Perspective reviews progress in applied geography in different regions of the world. It does this through the eyes of an international panel of highly regarded academic practitioners. The book offers new prospects on the use of established approaches and explores exciting new territories. Together, the contributors provide a comprehensive picture of applied geography today. This book is of relevance to faculty and graduate students in the fields of geography, planning, public policy, regional (...)
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  11. R. J. Johnston (ed.) (1985). The Future of Geography. Methuen.score: 42.0
    INTRODUCTION: EXPLORING THE FUTURE OF GEOGRAPHY RJ Johnston Geographers, not for the first time, are undertaking a critical reappraisal of their discipline ...
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  12. John A. Matthews & David T. Herbert (eds.) (2004). Unifying Geography: Common Heritage, Shared Future. Routledge.score: 42.0
    Unifying Geography focuses on the plural and competing versions of unity that characterize the discipline, which give it cohesion and differentiate it from related fields of knowledge. Each of the chapters is co-authored by both a leading physical and a human geographer. Themes identified include those of the traditional core as well as new and developing topics that are based on subject matter, concepts, methodology, theory, techniques and applications.
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  13. Alastair Bonnett (2008). What is Geography? Sage Publications.score: 42.0
    This text offers readers a short and highly accessible account of the ideas and concepts constituting geography. Drawing out the key themes that define the subject, What is Geography? demonstrates how and why these themes - like environment and geopolitics- are of fundamental importance. Including discussion of both the human and the natural realms, the text looks at key themes like environment, space, and place - as well as geography's methods and the history of the discipline. Introductory (...)
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  14. Jonathan Murdoch (2006). Post-Structuralist Geography: A Guide to Relational Space. Sage.score: 42.0
    Post-structuralist Geography is a highly accessible introduction to post-structuralist theory that critically assesses how post-structuralism can be used to study space and place. The text comprises: - a thorough appraisal of the work of key post-structuralist thinkers, including Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault, and Bruno Latour - case studies to elucidate, illustrate, and apply the theory - boxed summaries of complex arguments which - with the engaging writing style - provide a clear overview of post-structuralist approaches to the study of (...)
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  15. James S. Altengarten (1976). The History, Philosophy, and Methodology of Geography: A Bibliography Selected for Education and Research. Council of Planning Librarians.score: 42.0
     
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  16. Roger Brunet (2011). Sustainable Geography. Wiley.score: 42.0
    Sustainable Geography recalls the system and laws of geographical space production, tackles the hardcore of geography and presents models and organizations through a regional analysis and the dynamics of territorial structures and methods. The book also describes the general idea of discontinuities, trenches, the anti-dialectical and redivision-uniformity in the globalization and addresses the Transnational Urban Systems and Urban Network in Europe.
     
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  17. M. Duane Nellis, Janice J. Monk & Susan L. Cutter (eds.) (2004). Presidential Musings From the Meridian: Reflections on the Nature of Geography by Past Presidents of the Association of American Geographers. West Virginia University Press.score: 42.0
    For decades, presidents of the Association of American Geographers have written insightful columns in the AAG Newsletter. One of the most popular sections of the newsletter, these columns illustrate the changes and consistencies of geography over the past thirty-four years. They offer an insight into the past of the geography discipline and a broader perspective on the future. Previously inaccessible even to most professional geographers, the Presidential Columns will now be available in Presidential Musings from the Meridian: Reflections (...)
     
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  18. John L. Paterson (1984). David Harvey's Geography. Barnes & Noble Books.score: 39.0
    It also tells the story of the developments in the discipline during the past two decades.
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  19. Felix Driver (2001). Geography Militant: Cultures of Exploration and Empire. Blackwell Publishers.score: 39.0
    This book traces the emergence of a modern culture of exploration, as reflected in the role of institutions such as the Royal Geographical Society and the ...
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  20. Richard M. Gale (2010). William James at the Boundaries: Philosophy, Science, and the Geography of Knowledge (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (2):pp. 252-253.score: 39.0
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  21. Arnold Berleant (1997). Andrew Light and Jonathan M. Smith, Eds., Philosophy and Geography I: Space, Place, and Environmental Ethics Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 17 (5):342-345.score: 39.0
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  22. Mark Billinge, Derek Gregory & Ron Martin (eds.) (1983/1984). Recollections of a Revolution: Geography as Spatial Science. St. Martin's Press.score: 39.0
  23. Anne Buttimer (1974). Values in Geography. Washington,Association of American Geographers.score: 39.0
     
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  24. Richard Brook Cathcart (1979). The Developing Artificial Geography of the Solar System. Vance Bibliographies.score: 39.0
     
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  25. Paul Claval (1983). Models of Man in Geography. Dept. Of Geography, Syracuse University.score: 39.0
     
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  26. James S. Duncan (ed.) (1989). On Narrative and the New Regional Geography. Dept. Of Geography, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University.score: 39.0
     
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  27. J. Nicholas Entrikin (1991). The Betweenness of Place: Towards a Geography of Modernity. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 39.0
  28. Paulos Mar Gregorios (2002). Does Geography Condition Philosophy? On Goin «Beyond the Occidental-Oriental Distinction. In Paulos Gregorios (ed.), Neoplatonism and Indian Philosophy. State University of New York Press. 13.score: 39.0
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  29. Derek Gregory & Rex Walford (eds.) (1989). Horizons in Human Geography. Barnes & Noble Books.score: 39.0
     
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  30. Derek Gregory (1978/1979). Ideology, Science, and Human Geography. St. Martin's Press.score: 39.0
     
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  31. Peter Haggett (1977). Mid-Term Futures for Geography. Dept. Of Geography, Monash University.score: 39.0
     
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  32. David Harvey (1969). Explanation in Geography. London, Edward Arnold.score: 39.0
     
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  33. Torsten Hägerstrand & Allan Pred (eds.) (1981). Space and Time in Geography: Essays Dedicated to Torsten Hägerstrand. Cwk Gleerup.score: 39.0
  34. Arild Holt-Jensen (1980/1982). Geography, its History and Concepts: A Student's Guide. Barnes & Noble Books.score: 39.0
     
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  35. Eliot Hurst & E. Michael (1981). Human and Inhuman Geography: An Autocritique--A Journey Through the Corridors of Positivism and the Collective Discovery of an Altogether Different Harmony. Geography Dept., University of New England.score: 39.0
     
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  36. R. J. Johnston (1991). A Question of Place: Exploring the Practice of Human Geography. Blackwell.score: 39.0
     
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  37. R. J. Johnston (1989). Philosophy, Ideology and Geography. In Derek Gregory & Rex Walford (eds.), Horizons in Human Geography. Barnes & Noble Books. 48--66.score: 39.0
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  38. Pauli Karjalainen (1986). Geodiversity as a Lived World: On the Geography of Existence. Vaihto, Joensuun Yliopiston Kirjasto.score: 39.0
     
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  39. Alexander Klein (2012). Francesca Bordogna . William James at the Boundaries: Philosophy, Science, and the Geography of Knowledge . Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008. Pp. X+382, Index. $39.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (1):161-166.score: 39.0
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  40. Audrey Lynn Kobayashi & Suzanne Mackenzie (eds.) (1989). Remaking Human Geography. Unwin Hyman.score: 39.0
     
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  41. Erik Koed (2003). Gary Backhaus and John Murungi, Eds., Transformations of Urban and Suburban Landscapes: Perspectives From Philosophy, Geography, and Architecture Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (3):164-166.score: 39.0
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  42. David Ley (1980). Geography Without Man: A Humanistic Critique. School of Geography, University of Oxford.score: 39.0
     
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  43. Heino Mardiste (ed.) (1984). Problems of Territorial Organization of Geographical Systems: Publications on Geography, on the Occasion of the 25th International Geographical Congress. Tartu State University.score: 39.0
     
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  44. Hideki Nozawa (ed.) (1986). Cosmology, Epistemology, and the History of Geography. Institute of Geography, Faculty of Letters, Kyushu University.score: 39.0
  45. R. B. Ogendo (1982). Geography, the Discipline and its Role in Public Policy. University of Nairobi.score: 39.0
     
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  46. E. C. Relph (1976). The Phenomenological Foundations of Geography. Dept. Of Geography, University of Toronto.score: 39.0
     
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  47. Keiichi Takeuchi (ed.) (1984). Languages, Paradigms, and Schools in Geography. Laboratory of Social Geography, Hitotsubashi University.score: 39.0
     
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  48. Christiaan van Paassen (1981). The Philosophy of Geography. In Torsten Hägerstrand & Allan Pred (eds.), Space and Time in Geography: Essays Dedicated to Torsten Hägerstrand. Cwk Gleerup.score: 39.0
     
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  49. D. J. Walmsley (1984/1986). Human Geography: Behavioural Approaches. Wiley.score: 39.0
     
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  50. David Sibley (1995). Geographies of Exclusion: Society and Difference in the West. Burns & Oates.score: 36.0
    Geographies of Exclusion identifies forms of social and spatial exclusion and subsequently examines the fate of knowledge of space and society which has been produced by members of excluded groups. Evaluating writing on urban society by women and black writers, David Sibley asks why such work is neglected by the academic establishment, suggesting that both the practices which result in the exclusion of minorities and those which result in the exclusion of knowledge have important implications for theory and method in (...)
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