Search results for 'George J. Graham' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. George J. Graham (1993). The Necessity of the Tension. Social Epistemology 7 (1):25-34.score: 870.0
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  2. George Graham & J. Neisser (2000). Probing for Relevance: What Metacognition Tells Us About the Power of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):172-177.score: 810.0
    Metacognitive attitudes can affect behavior but do they do so, as Koriat claims, because they enhance voluntary control? This Commentary makes a case for saying that metacognitive consciousness may enhance not control but subjective predictability and may be best studied by examining not just healthy, well-integrated cognizers, but victims of multilevel mental disorders.
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  3. J. B. Schneewind, Paul Humphreys, Leonard Katz, Celia Wolf-Devine, George Graham, Daniel P. Anderson, Mary Ellen Waithe, Tibor R. Machan & Jonathan E. Adler (1996). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 69 (5):141 - 150.score: 810.0
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  4. Gordon Graham, Eric de Bellaigue, Laurence Urdang, Fernando Guedes, J. Alexis Koutchoumow, Paul Nijhoff Asser, Alexandra Koval, Ian McGowan, Ken M. C. Nweke & George Greenfield (1990). Brill Online Books and Journals. Logos 1 (1).score: 810.0
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  5. George Graham (1985). Ecological Ethics and Politics. By H. J. McCloskey. Modern Schoolman 62 (2):143-144.score: 810.0
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  6. Michael Saginur, Ian D. Graham, Alan J. Forster, Michel Boucher & George A. Wells (2008). The Uptake of Technologies Designed to Influence Medication Safety in Canadian Hospitals. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (1):27-35.score: 810.0
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  7. A. J. Graham (1993). Adolfo J. Domínguez Monedero: La Polis y la Expansión Colonial Griega (Siglos VIII–VI). (Historia Universal Antigua, 6.) Pp. 287; 15 Figs, (Maps and Drawings). Madrid: Sintesis, 1991. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (01):195-196.score: 540.0
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  8. George Graham, Terence Horgan, Mary Mary & Quite Contrary (2000). Editorial 1 Knowing One's Own Actions George Wilson/Proximal Practical Foresight 3–19 Kevin Falvey/Knowledge in Intention 21–44 Nomy Arpaly/Hamlet and the Utilitarians 45–57. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 99:373-374.score: 540.0
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  9. Peter J. Graham (2011). Perceptual Entitlement and Basic Beliefs. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 153 (3):467-475.score: 520.0
    Perceptual entitlement and basic beliefs Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11098-010-9603-3 Authors Peter J. Graham, University of California, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA USA Journal Philosophical Studies Online ISSN 1573-0883 Print ISSN 0031-8116.
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  10. George Graham (1993). Philosophy of Mind: An Introduction. Blackwell.score: 480.0
    In this second edition, George Graham maintains the strengths, structure, and overall features of the first, but expands its scope, deepens the detail, and ...
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  11. George Graham & Terence E. Horgan (1998). Sensations and Grain Processes. In Gregory R. Mulhauser (ed.), Evolving Consciousness. John Benjamins.score: 450.0
    This paper celebrates an anniversary, or near anniversary. As we write it is just more than 40 years since U. T. Place's “Is consciousness a brain process?†appeared in the British Journal of Psychology, and just less than 40 since J. J. C. Smart's “Sensations and brain processes†appeared, in its first version, in The Philosophical Review (Place 1962/1956, Smart 1962/1959).  These two papers arguably founded contemporary philosophy of mind. They defined its central preoccupation (the ontology of consciousness), introduced (...)
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  12. George Graham & Terence E. Horgan (2002). Sensations and Grain Processes. In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Consciousness Evolving. John Benjamins.score: 450.0
    This paper celebrates an anniversary, or near anniversary. As we write it is just more than 40 years since U. T. Place's “Is consciousness a brain process?†appeared in the British Journal of Psychology, and just less than 40 since J. J. C. Smart's “Sensations and brain processes†appeared, in its first version, in The Philosophical Review (Place 1962/1956, Smart 1962/1959).  These two papers arguably founded contemporary philosophy of mind. They defined its central preoccupation (the ontology of consciousness), introduced (...)
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  13. Daniel W. Graham (2006). De Haas (F.), Mansfeld (J.) (Edd.) Aristotle's On Generation and Corruption, Book I: Symposium Aristotelicum. Pp . X + 347. Oxford: Clarendon Press. Cased. £45. ISBN: 0-19-924292-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (01):63-.score: 360.0
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  14. Keith Graham (1977). J. L. Austin: A Critique of Ordinary Language Philosophy. Harvester Press.score: 360.0
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  15. Emma-Jayne Graham (2012). Childhood (K.) Mustakallio, (J.) Hanska, (H.-L.) Sainio, (V.) Vuolanto (Edd.) Hoping for Continuity: Childhood, Education and Death in Antiquity and the Middle Ages. (Acta Instituti Romani Finlandiae 33.) Pp. Xii + 253, Ills. Rome: Institutum Romanum Finlandiae, 2005. Paper, €35. ISBN: 952-5323-09-9. (V.) Dasen, (T.) Späth (Edd.) Children, Memory, and Family Identity in Roman Culture. Pp. Xvi + 373, Ills. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Cased, £70, US$125. ISBN: 978-0-19-955679-3. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 62 (1):257-262.score: 360.0
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  16. Gordon Graham (1992). Book Review of Scribblers for Bread by George Greenfield. [REVIEW] Logos 3 (4):220-220.score: 360.0
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  17. Daniel W. Graham (1989). Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Vol. 4: A Festschrift for J.L. Ackrill. History of European Ideas 10 (1):103-104.score: 360.0
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  18. Peter J. Graham (1997). What is Testimony? Philosophical Quarterly 47 (187):227-232.score: 300.0
    C.A.J. Coady, in his book Testimony: A Philosophical Study (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992), offers conditions on an assertion that p to count as testimony. He claims that the assertion that p must be by a competent speaker directed to an audience in need of evidence and it must be evidence that p. I offer examples to show that Coady’s conditions are too strong. Testimony need not be evidence; the speaker need not be competent; and, the statement need not be relevant (...)
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  19. George Graham & Terence E. Horgan (2005). Mary Mary au Contraire: Reply to Raffman. Philosophical Studies 122 (2):203-12.score: 300.0
               Diana Raffman (in press) emphasizes a useful and important distinction that deserves heed in discussions of phenomenal consciousness: the distinction between what it’s like to see red and how red things look. (Two alternative locutions that also can express the latter idea, we take it, are ‘what red looks like’ and ‘what red is like’.) Raffman plausibly argues that this distinction should be incorporated into theories of phenomenal consciousness, including (...)
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  20. Gordon Graham (2007). The Re-Enchantment of the World: Art Versus Religion. OUP Oxford.score: 300.0
    The Re-enchantment of the World is a philosophical exploration of the role of art and religion as sources of meaning in an increasingly material world dominated by science. Gordon Graham takes as his starting point Max Weber's idea that contemporary Western culture is marked by a 'disenchantment of the world' -- the loss of spiritual value in the wake of religion's decline and the triumph of the physical and biological sciences. Relating themes in Hegel, Nietzsche, Schleiermacher, Schopenhauer, and Gadamer (...)
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  21. Frederick J. Evans & Charles Graham (1980). Subjective Random Number Generation and Attention Deployment During Acquisition and Overlearning of a Motor Skill. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 15 (6):391-394.score: 280.0
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  22. I. P. L. McLaren, Andy J. Wills & S. Graham (2011). Representation Development, Perceptual Learning, and Concept Formation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):141-142.score: 280.0
    We argue for an example of based on Diamond and Carey's (1986) work on expertise and recognition, which is not made use of in The Origin of Concepts. This mechanism for perceptual learning seems to have all the necessary characteristics in that it is innate, domain-specific (requires stimulus sets possessing a certain structure), and demonstrably affects categorisation in a way that strongly suggests it will influence concept formation as well.
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  23. Bettina G. Bergo, Bernard Boxill, Matthew B. Crawford, Patrick Croskery, Michael J. Degnan, Paul Graham, Kenneth Kipnis, Avery H. Kolers, Henry S. Richardson & David S. Weberman (2002). Book Notes. [REVIEW] Ethics 112 (4):884-889.score: 280.0
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  24. John J. Paris, Neil Graham, Michael D. Schreiber & Michele Goodwin (2006). Has the Emphasis on Autonomy Gone Too Far? Insights From Dostoevsky on Parental Decisionmaking in the NICU. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (02):147-151.score: 280.0
  25. P. J. Webster & S. Graham (2012). Completion of Consent Forms in Colorectal Surgery: Are We Getting It Right? Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (9):574-574.score: 280.0
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  26. Philip C. J. Donoghue, Anthony Graham & Robert N. Kelsh (2008). The Origin and Evolution of the Neural Crest. Bioessays 30 (6):530-541.score: 280.0
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  27. J. Gibson & K. Graham (1997). Postmodern Becomings: From the Space of Form to the Space of Potentiality. In Georges Benko & Ulf Strohmayer (eds.), Space and Social Theory: Interpreting Modernity and Postmodernity. Blackwell Publishers.score: 280.0
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  28. J. Lewis & J. Graham (2007). Research Participants' Views on Ethics in Social Research: Issues for Research Ethics Committees. Research Ethics 3 (3):73-79.score: 280.0
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  29. Siobhan O'Donnell, Ann Cranney, Mary J. Jacobsen, Ian D. Graham, Annette M. O'Connor & Peter Tugwell (2006). Understanding and Overcoming the Barriers of Implementing Patient Decision Aids in Clinical Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (2):174-181.score: 280.0
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  30. M. J. Peterson & S. E. Graham (1974). Visual Detection and Visual Imagery. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (3):509.score: 280.0
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  31. H. Pickard, J. Poland & G. Graham (2011). Review of Addiction and Responsibility. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 11.score: 280.0
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  32. Peter J. Graham (2011). Does Justification Aim at Truth? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):51-72.score: 240.0
    Does epistemic justification aim at truth? The vast majority of epistemologists instinctively answer 'Yes'; it's the textbook response. Joseph Cruz and John Pollock surprisingly say no. In 'The Chimerical Appeal of Epistemic Externalism' they argue that justification bears no interesting connection to truth; justification does not even aim at truth. 'Truth is not a very interesting part of our best understanding' of justification (C&P 2004, 137); it has no 'connection to the truth.' A 'truth-aimed ... epistemology is not entitled to (...)
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  33. Terence E. Horgan, John L. Tienson & George Graham (2004). Phenomenal Intentionality and the Brain in a Vat. In Richard Schantz (ed.), The Externalist Challenge. Walter De Gruyter.score: 240.0
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  34. Peter J. Graham (forthcoming). The Function of Perception. In Abrol Fairweather (ed.), Virtue Scientia: Virtue Epistemology and Philosophy of Science. Synthese Library.score: 240.0
    What is the biological function of perception? I hold perception, especially visual perception in humans, has the biological function of accurately representing the environment. Tyler Burge argues this cannot be so in Origins of Objectivity (Oxford, 2010), for accuracy is a semantical relationship and not, as such, a practical matter. Burge also provides a supporting example. I rebut the argument and the example. Accuracy is sometimes also a practical matter if accuracy partly explains how perception contributes to survival and reproduction.
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  35. Peter J. Graham (2011). Intelligent Design and Selective History: Two Sources of Purpose and Plan. Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 3:67-88.score: 240.0
  36. Peter J. Graham (2012). Epistemic Entitlement. Noûs 46 (3):449-482.score: 240.0
  37. George Graham & Terence E. Horgan (2000). Mary Mary, Quite Contrary. Philosophical Studies 99 (1):59-87.score: 240.0
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  38. George Graham & Hugh LaFollette (1986). Honesty and Intimacy. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships.score: 240.0
    Current professional and lay lore overlook the role of honesty in developing and sustaining intimate relationships. We wish to assert its importance. We begin by analyzing the notion of intimacy. An intimate encounter or exchange, we argue, is one in which one verbally or non-verbally privately reveals something about oneself, and does so in a sensitive, trusting way. An intimate relationship is one marked by regular intimate encounters or exchanges. Then, we consider two sorts of cases where it is widely (...)
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  39. George Graham (1999). Self-Consciousness, Psychopathology, and Realism About the Self. Anthropology and Philosophy 3 (2).score: 240.0
  40. Peter J. Graham (2004). Metaphysical Libertarianism and the Epistemology of Testimony. American Philosophical Quarterly 41 (1):37-50.score: 240.0
    Reductionism about testimony holds that testimonial warrant or entitlement is just a species of inductive warrant. Anti-Reductionism holds that it is different from inductive but analogous to perceptual or memorial warrant. Perception receives much of its positive epistemic status from being reliably truthconducive in normal conditions. One reason to reject the epistemic analogy is that testimony involves agency – it goes through the will of the speaker – but perception does not. A speaker might always choose to lie or otherwise (...)
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  41. George Graham (2010). The Disordered Mind: An Introduction to Philosophy of Mind and Mental Illness. Routledge.score: 240.0
    Conceiving mental disorder -- Disorder of mental disorder -- On being skeptical about mental disorder -- Seeking norms for mental disorder -- An original position -- Addiction and responsibility for self -- Reality lost and found -- Minding the missing me.
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  42. George Graham, Behaviorism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 240.0
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  43. Peter J. Graham (forthcoming). Functions, Warrant, History. In Abrol Fairweather & Owen Flanagan (eds.), Naturalizing Epistemic Virtue. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
    I hold that epistemic warrant consists in the normal functioning of the belief-forming process when the process has forming true beliefs reliably as an etiological function. Evolution by natural selection is the central source of etiological functions. This leads many to think that on my view warrant requires a history of natural selection. What then about learning? What then about Swampman? Though functions require history, natural selection is not the only source. Self-repair and trial-and-error learning are both sources. Warrant requires (...)
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  44. Peter J. Graham (2010). Theorizing Justification. In Knowledge and Skepticism. MIT Press.score: 240.0
    The standard taxonomy of theories of epistemic justification generates four positions from the Foundationalism v. Coherentism and Internalism v. Externalism disputes. I develop a new taxonomy driven by two other distinctions: Fundamentalism v. Non-Fundamentalism and Actual-Result v. Proper-Aim conceptions of epistemic justification. Actual-Result theorists hold that a belief is justified only if, as an actual matter of fact, it is held or formed in a way that makes it more likely than not to be true. Proper-Aim theorists hold that a (...)
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  45. Peter J. Graham (2010). Testimonial Entitlement and the Function of Comprehension. In Duncan Pritchard, Alan Millar & Adrian Haddock (eds.), Social Epistemology. Oxford University Press. 148--174.score: 240.0
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  46. Peter J. Graham (2006). Can Testimony Generate Knowledge? Philosophica 78:105-127.score: 240.0
    Orthodoxy in epistemology maintains that some sources of belief, e.g. perception and introspection, generate knowledge, while others, e.g. testimony and memory, preserve knowledge. An example from Jennifer Lackey B the Schoolteacher case B purports to show that testimony can generate knowledge. It is argued that Lackey's case fails to subvert the orthodox view, for the case does not involve the generation of knowledge by testimony. A modified version of the case does. Lackey's example illustrates the orthodox view; the revised case (...)
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  47. George Graham (1990). Melancholic Epistemology. Synthese 82 (3):399-422.score: 240.0
    Too little attention has been paid by philosophers to the cognitive and epistemic dimensions of emotional disturbances such as depression, grief, and anxiety and to the possibility of justification or warrant for such conditions. The chief aim of the present paper is to help to remedy that deficiency with respect to depression. Taxonomy of depression reveals two distinct forms: depression (1) with intentionality and (2) without intentionality. Depression with intentionality can be justified or unjustified, warranted or unwarranted. I argue that (...)
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  48. George Graham (1999). Fuzzy Fault Lines: Selves in Multiple Personality Disorder. Philosophical Explorations 2 (3):159-174.score: 240.0
    This paper outlines a multidimensional conception of Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) that differs from the 'orthodox' conception in terms of the content of its commitment to the reality of the self. Unlike the orthodox conception it recognizes that selves are fuzzy entities. By appreciating the possibility that selves are fuzzy entities, it is possible to rebut a form of fictionalism about the self which appeals to clinical data from MPD. Realism about self can be preserved in the face of multiple (...)
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  49. Peter J. Graham (2006). Liberal Fundamentalism and its Rivals. In Jennifer Lackey & Ernest Sosa (eds.), The Epistemology of Testimony. Oxford. 93--115.score: 240.0
    Many hold that perception is a source of epistemically basic (direct) belief: for justification, perceptual beliefs do not need positive inferential support from other justified beliefs, especially from beliefs about one’s current sensory episodes. Perceptual beliefs can, however, be defeated or undermined by other things one believes, and so to be justified in the end there must be no undefeated undermining grounds. Similarly for memory and introspection.1..
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  50. Peter J. Graham (2000). The Reliability of Testimony. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (3):695-709.score: 240.0
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