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  1. Ger Snik & Johan De Jong (2005). Why Liberal State Funding of Denominational Schools Cannot Be Unconditional: A Reply to Neil Burtonwood. Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (1):113–122.
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  2. Ger Snik, Johan De Jong & Wouter Van Haaften (2004). Preventive Intervention in Families at Risk: The Limits of Liberalism. Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (2):181–193.
  3. Johan De Jong & Ger Snik (2002). Why Should States Fund Denominational Schools? Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (4):573–587.
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  4. Wouter van Haaften & Ger Snik (1997). Critical Thinking and Foundational Development. Studies in Philosophy and Education 16 (1/2):19-41.
    We elaborate on Israel Scheffler's claim that principles of rationality can be rationally evaluated, focusing on foundational development, by which we mean the evolution of principles which are constitutive of our conceptualization of a certain domain of rationality. How can claims that some such principles are better than prior ones, be justified? We argue that Scheffler's metacriterion of overall systematic credibility is insufficient here. Two very different types of rational development are jointly involved, namely, development of general principles that are (...)
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  5. Ger Snik & Johan De Jong (1995). Liberalism and Denominational Schools. Journal of Moral Education 24 (4):395-407.
    Abstract This paper discusses the problematic relation between liberalism and freedom of education, i.e. the right of (groups of) parents to found schools in which they can educate their children in accordance with their particular conception of the good life. First, the educational and philosophical backgrounds of the conflict between liberalism and freedom of education are explicated. Secondly, it is suggested that freedom of education can be considered a liberal value. The right to freedom of education is interpreted as a (...)
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