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  1. Gerard A. W. Vreeswijk (2005). Direct Connectionistic Methods for Scientific Theory Formation. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 84 (1):375-403.
    Thagard's theory of explanatory coherence (TEC) is a conceptual and computational framework that is used to show how new scientific theories can be judged to be superior to previous ones. In Structures in Science (SiS), Kuipers criticizes TEC as a model that does not faithfully reflect scientific practice. This article tries to explain the machinery behind TEC, and tries to indicate where TEC falls short (conceptually speaking) and where it can be improved. The main idea proposed in this article is (...)
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  2. Gerard A. W. Vreeswijk & Arno R. Lodder (2005). Gearbi: Towards an Online Arbitration Environment Based on the Design Principles Simplicity, Awareness, Orientation, and Timeliness. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 13 (2):297-321.
    Arbitration is a preferred method for the resolution of international business disputes. As of yet, most publications on online arbitration deal with legal issues. In this paper, we present an Online arbitration environment that we believe facilitates the participants in a meaningful way. Our assumption is that an ODR service should be easy to use (convenient), and at the same time provide meaningful support. More specifically we have paid attention to four criteria that we believe are important, viz. simplicity, awareness, (...)
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  3. Gerard A. W. Vreeswijk (2003). Book Review: Bayesian Artificial Intelligence. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 11 (4):289-298.
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  4. Gerard A. W. Vreeswijk (2001). Eight Dialectic Benchmarks Discussed by Two Artificial Localist Disputors. Synthese 127 (1-2):221 - 253.
    Dispute types can roughly be divided in two classes. One class in whichthe notion of justification is fundamental, and one in which thenotion of opposition is fundamental. Further, for every singledispute type there exist various types of protocols to conduct such adispute. Some protocols permit local search (a process in which oneis allowed to justify claims partially, with the possibility to extendjustifications on request later), while other protocols rely on globalsearch (a process in which only entire arguments count as justifications).This (...)
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  5. Gerard A. W. Vreeswijk (2000). Arno R. Lodder, Dialaw: On Legal Justification and Dialogical Models of Argumentation. Law and Philosophy Library Vol. 42. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 8 (2-3):265-276.
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  6. Gerard A. W. Vreeswijk (2000). Representation of Formal Dispute with Astanding Order. Artificial Intelligence and Law 8 (2-3):205-231.
    Computational dialectics is concerned with the formal representation of argument and dispute. The field emerged from developments in philosophy, artificial intelligence and legal theory. Its goal is to suggestalgorithms, procedures and protocols to investigate the tenability of logical claims, on the basis of information in the form of rules and cases. Currently, the field slowlyconverges to the opinion that dispute is the most fair and effective way to investigate claims. The basic assumption of this field is that dispute is the (...)
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  7. Gerard A. W. Vreeswijk (1995). The Computational Value of Debate in Defeasible Reasoning. Argumentation 9 (2):305-342.
    Defeasible reasoning is concerned with the logics of non-deductive argument. As is described in the literature, the study of this type of reasoning is considerably more involved than the study of deductive argument, even so that, in realistic applications, there is often a lack of resources to perform an exhaustive analysis. It follows that, in a theory of defeasible reasoning, the order and direction in which arguments are developed, i.e. theprocedure, is important. The aim of this article is to show (...)
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