Search results for 'Gerry C. Heard' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gerry C. Heard (1990). Basic Values and Ethical Decisions: An Examination of Individualism and Community in American Society. R.E. Krieger Pub. Co..score: 870.0
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  2. Howard Minkoff & Anne Drapkin Lyerly (2010). Samantha Burton and the Rights of Pregnant Women Twenty Years After In Re A.C. Hastings Center Report 40 (6):13-15.score: 36.0
    In 1987, a young woman named Angela Carder, pregnant and dying from cancer, was ordered by a court of law to undergo a cesarean delivery against her and her family’s wishes. She and her baby both died. Three years later, an appeals court took an extraordinary stand: it vacated the order that ended their lives and upheld pregnant women’s rights to informed consent and bodily integrity. The “unkindest cut of all,”1 it seemed, had been condemned by the courts.2 Yet shortly (...)
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  3. C. W. H. Sutton (1952). Is God Evident? By Gerald Heard. (Faber & Faber Ltd. 1950. Pp. 247. Price 12s. 6d.)Is God in History? By Gerald Heard. (Faber & Faber Ltd. 1951. Pp. 252. Price 15s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 27 (102):260-.score: 36.0
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  4. Simon Saunders, See the Symmetries.score: 24.0
    I heard about and laid hold of the idea of a four dimensional frame for a fresh apprehension of physical phenomena, which afterwards led me to send a paper, ‘The Universe Rigid’, to the Fortnightly Review (a paper which was rejected by Frank Harris as ‘incomprehensible’), and gave me a frame for my …rst scienti…c fantasia, The Time Machine. If there was a Universe rigid, and hitherto uniform, the character of the consequent world would depend entirely, I argued (...)
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  5. Maria Bittner, Notes From Greenland.score: 24.0
    Tuesday evening, December 27, 1983 …I did go skiing today, though, which is what I want to write about. The temperature is down to –10°C again, on my thermometer, which probably means –12 to –13°C, in real terms. The visibility is still very poor though the wind has stopped. I set off at 2 pm and got home at about 4 pm, which meant skiing in the dark all the time. This wouldn’t have bothered me except that I had an (...)
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  6. J. Sutton (2001). Rene´ Descartes. In Encyclopedia of the life sciences. Macmillan. 383-386.score: 24.0
    Descartes was born in La Haye (now Descartes) in Touraine and educated at the Jesuit college of La Fleche` in Anjou. Descartes’modern reputation as a rationalistic armchair philosopher, whose mind–body dualism is the source of damaging divisions between psychology and the life sciences, is almost entirely undeserved. Some 90% of his surviving correspondence is on mathematics and scientific matters, from acoustics and hydrostatics to chemistry and the practical problems of constructing scientific instruments. Descartes was just as interested in the motions (...)
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  7. Chris Davis Anne Cutler (2012). An Orthographic Effect in Phoneme Processing, and Its Limitations. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    To examine whether lexically stored knowledge about spelling influences phoneme evaluation, we conducted three experiments with a low-level phonetic judgement task: phoneme goodness rating. In each experiment, listeners heard phonetic tokens varying along a continuum centred on /s/, occurring finally in isolated word or nonword tokens. An effect of spelling appeared in Experiment 1: Native English speakers’ goodness ratings for the best /s/ tokens were significantly higher in words spelled with S (e.g., bless) than in words spelled with C (...)
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  8. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2011). Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health. OUP USA.score: 24.0
    In the United States alone, industrial and agricultural toxins account for about 60,000 avoidable cancer deaths annually. Pollution-related health costs to Americans are similarly staggering: $13 billion a year from asthma, $351 billion from cardiovascular disease, and $240 billion from occupational disease and injury. Most troubling, children, the poor, and minorities bear the brunt of these health tragedies. Why, asks Kristin Shrader-Frechette, has the government failed to protect us, and what can we do about it? In this book, at once (...)
     
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  9. Daniel C. Dennett, The Fantasy of First-Person Science.score: 12.0
    A week ago, I heard James Conant give a talk at Tufts, entitled “Two Varieties of Skepticism” in which he distinguished two oft-confounded questions:
    Descartes: How is it possible for me to tell whether a thought of mine is true or false, perception or dream?
    Kant: How is it possible for something even to _be_ a thought (of mine)? What are the conditions for the possibility of experience (veridical or illusory) at all?
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  10. David C. Thompson & Melanie Wachtell, An Empirical Analysis of Supreme Court Certiorari Petition Procedures: The Call for Response and the Call for the Views of the Solicitor General.score: 12.0
    The Supreme Court frequently uses two tools to gather information about which cases to hear following a petition for writ of certiorari: the call for response and the call for the views of the Solicitor General. To date, there has been no empirical analysis of how the Supreme Court deploys these tools and little qualitative study. This Article fills in basic gaps in the literature by providing concrete answers to common questions regarding these two tools and offers detailed analysis of (...)
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  11. J. Sandor, P. Bard, C. Tamburrini & T. Tannsjo (2012). The Case of Biobank with the Law: Between a Legal and Scientific Fiction. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (6):347-350.score: 12.0
    According to estimates more than 400 biobanks currently operate across Europe. The term ‘biobank’ indicates a specific field of genetic study that has quietly developed without any significant critical reflection across European societies. Although scientists now routinely use this phrase, the wider public is still confused when the word ‘bank’ is being connected with the collection of their biological samples. There is a striking lack of knowledge of this field. In the recent Eurobarometer survey it was demonstrated that even in (...)
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  12. David I. Leitman, Pejman Sehatpour, Christina Garidis, Manuel Gomez-Ramirez & Daniel C. Javitt (2011). Preliminary Evidence of Pre-Attentive Distinctions of Frequency-Modulated Tones That Convey Affect. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:96-96.score: 12.0
    Recognizing emotion is an evolutionary imperative. An early stage of auditory scene analysis involves the perceptual grouping of acoustic features, which can be based on both temporal coincidence and spectral features such as perceived pitch. Perceived pitch, or fundamental frequency (F0), is an especially salient cue for differentiating affective intent through speech intonation (prosody). We hypothesized that: 1) simple frequency modulated (FM) tone abstractions, based on the parameters of actual prosodic stimuli, would be reliably classified as representing differing emotional categories; (...)
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  13. Roberta A. Davilla & Judy C. Pearson (1994). Children's Perspectives of the Family: A Phenomenological Inquiry. [REVIEW] Human Studies 17 (3):325 - 341.score: 12.0
    As researchers and as adults, caution must be maintained in perpetuating the rational approach to all family experience. Limiting the study of the family to the adult and, more communicatively competent, older siblings creates an artificial barrier that blocks insight into early childhood socialization practices and understandings.This study has raised the notion that children have valuable experiences that they quickly learn, embody, re-produce, and can present to researchers. As family members, they create and perpetuate those practices that reify the patriarchal (...)
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