Search results for 'Gershom Carmichael' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gershom Carmichael, James Moore & Michael Silverthorne (2002). Natural Rights on the Threshold of the Scottish Enlightenment the Writings of Gershom Carmichael. Liberty Fund.
  2. Gershom Carmichael (1985). Gershom Carmichael's Supplements and Appendix to Samuel Pufendorf's De Officio Hominis Et Civis Juxta Legem Naturalem Libri Duo, as Well as the Introduction to the 1769 Edition and the 1727 Acta Eruditorum Review of Carmichael's Notes. [REVIEW] J.N. Lenhart.
  3.  9
    R. D. Carmichael (1925). Carmichael's Reply to Klyce. The Monist 35 (3):496-497.
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  4. Mark H. Waymack (1986). Moral Philosophy and Newtonianism in the Scottish Enlightenment: A Study of the Moral Philosophies of Gershom Carmichael, Francis Hutcheson, David Hume and Adam Smith. Dissertation, The Johns Hopkins University
    This thesis studies the development of empiricist Scottish moral philosophy from its origins in the work of Gershom Carmichael through the works of Francis Hutcheson, David Hume, and Adam Smith. Impressed by the successes of the new sciences, particularly Newtonian science, these philosophers each sought to bring this modern scientific method to bear upon the pursuit of moral theory. By tracing the development of moral philosophy through these four authors, we find important changes in how they understand the (...)
     
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  5.  26
    Samuel Gregg (2009). Metaphysics and Modernity: Natural Law and Natural Rights in Gershom Carmichael and Francis Hutcheson. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (1):87-102.
    This paper argues that the founding fathers of the tradition of Scottish Enlightenment natural jurisprudence, Gersholm Carmichael (1672–1729) and Francis Hutcheson (1694–1746), articulated a view of rights that is pertinent to the contemporary dominance of the language of rights. Maintaining a metaphysical foundation for rights while drawing upon the early-modern Protestant natural law tradition, their conception of rights is more significantly indebted to the pre-modern scholastic natural law tradition than often realized. This is illustrated by exploring some of the (...)
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    James A. Harris (2003). Review of James Moore and Michael Silverthorne: Natural Rights on the Threshold of the Scottish Enlightenment: The Writings of Gershom Carmichael. [REVIEW] Journal of Scottish Philosophy 1 (2):175-179.
  7.  8
    James A. Harris (2003). :Natural Rights on the Threshold of the Scottish Enlightenment: The Writings of Gershom Carmichael. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 1 (2):175-179.
  8. Michael Silverthorne & James Moore (1982). Gershom Carmichael and the Natural Jurisprudence Tradition in Eighteenth-Century Scotland. Lumen 1:41-53.
     
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  9. Daniel Z. Korman & Chad Carmichael, Composition (Draft: 9/29/15). Oxford Handbooks Online.
    When some objects are the parts of another object, they compose that object and that object is composite. This article is intended as an introduction to the central questions about composition and a highly selective overview of various answers to those questions. In §1, we review some formal features of parthood that are important for understanding the nature of composition. In §2, we consider some answers to the question: which pluralities of objects together compose something? As we will (...)
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  10. Daniel Z. Korman & Chad Carmichael (forthcoming). What Do the Folk Think About Composition and Does It Matter? In David Rose (ed.), Experimental Philosophy and Metaphysics. Bloomsbury
    Rose and Schaffer (forthcoming) argue that teleological thinking has a substantial influence on folk intuitions about composition. They take this to show (i) that we should not rely on folk intuitions about composition and (ii) that we therefore should not reject theories of composition on the basis of intuitions about composition. We cast doubt on the teleological interpretation of folk judgments about composition; we show how their debunking argument can be resisted, even on the assumption (...)
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  11. Chad Carmichael (2016). Deep Platonism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 91 (3):307-328.
    According to the traditional bundle theory, particulars are bundles of compresent universals. I think we should reject the bundle theory for a variety of reasons. But I will argue for the thesis at the core of the bundle theory: that all the facts about particulars are grounded in facts about universals. I begin by showing how to meet the main objection to this thesis (which is also the main objection to the bundle theory): that it is inconsistent with the possibility (...)
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  12. Chad Carmichael (2015). Toward a Commonsense Answer to the Special Composition Question. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (3):475-490.
    The special composition question is the question, ‘When do some things compose something?’ The answers to this question in the literature have largely been at odds with common sense, either by allowing that any two things compose something, or by denying the existence of most ordinary composite objects. I propose a new ‘series-style’ answer to the special composition question that accords much more closely with common sense, and I defend this answer from van Inwagen's objections. Specifically, I will (...)
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  13. Chad Carmichael (2013). Philosophical Logic: An Introduction to Advanced Topics, by George Englebretsen and Charles Sayward. [REVIEW] Teaching Philosophy 36 (4):420-423.
    This book serves as a concise introduction to some main topics in modern formal logic for undergraduates who already have some familiarity with formal languages. There are chapters on sentential and quantificational logic, modal logic, elementary set theory, a brief introduction to the incompleteness theorem, and a modern development of traditional Aristotelian Logic.
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  14. Chad Carmichael (2010). Universals. Philosophical Studies 150 (3):373-389.
    In this paper, I argue that there are universals. I begin (Sect. 1) by proposing a sufficient condition for a thing’s being a universal. I then argue (Sect. 2) that some truths exist necessarily. Finally, I argue (Sects. 3 and 4) that these truths are structured entities having constituents that meet the proposed sufficient condition for being universals.
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  15. Chad Carmichael (2011). Vague Composition Without Vague Existence. Noûs 45 (2):315-327.
    David Lewis (1986) criticizes moderate views of composition on the grounds that a restriction on composition must be vague, and vague composition leads, via a precisificational theory of vagueness, to an absurd vagueness of existence. I show how to resist this argument. Unlike the usual resistance, however, I do not jettison precisificational views of vagueness. Instead, I blur the connection between composition and existence that Lewis assumes. On the resulting view, in troublesome cases of vague composition, there is an object, (...)
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  16. Chad Carmichael (2012). Quantification and Conversation. In Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O'Rourke & Harry S. Silverstein (eds.), Reference and Referring: Topics in Contemporary Philosophy. MIT Press 305-323.
    Relative to an ordinary context, an utterance of the sentence ‘Everything is in the car’ communicates a proposition about a restricted domain. But how does this work? One possibility is that quantifier expressions like 'everything' are context sensitive and range over different domains in different contexts. Another possibility is that quantifier expressions are not context sensitive, but have a fixed, absolutely general meaning, and ordinary utterances communicate a restricted content via Gricean mechanisms. I argue that, contrary to received opinion, the (...)
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  17.  88
    Chad Carmichael (2013). The Universe As We Find It, by John Heil. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2013.
    In this ambitious work, John Heil presents a fundamental ontology (chapters 1-8) consisting of finitely many substances and their properties (which he thinks of as particular, trope-like things), together with an account of causation, truthmaking, and a chapter on relations generally. He then applies this ontology (chapters 9-12) to a number of outstanding problems about reductionism, kinds, essences, emergence, consciousness, cognition, and much else. A final chapter reprises the main points about fundamental ontology from the first chapters.
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  18. Istvan Hont & Michael Ignatieff (eds.) (1983). Wealth and Virtue the Shaping of Political Economy in the Scottish Enlightenment. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Wealth and Virtue reassesses the remarkable contribution of the Scottish Enlightenment to the formation of modern economics and to theories of capitalism. Its unique range indicates the scope of the Scottish intellectual achievement of the eighteenth century and explores the process by which the boundaries between economic thought, jurisprudence, moral philosophy and theoretical history came to be established. Dealing not only with major figures like Hume and Smith, there are also studies of lesser known thinkers like Andrew Fletcher, Gershom (...)
     
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  19.  23
    Leonard Carmichael (1926). Biological Memory. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 23 (26):718-720.
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  20.  22
    Leonard Carmichael (1933). Association Theory To-Day. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 30 (25):689-695.
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  21. Peter A. Carmichael (1961). Aesthetic Knowledge. Journal of Philosophy 58 (14):378-387.
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  22.  24
    R. D. Carmichael (1923). Concerning the Postulational Treatment of Empirical Truth. The Monist 33 (4):513-555.
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  23.  48
    L. Carmichael, H. P. Hogan & A. A. Walter (1932). An Experimental Study of the Effect of Language on the Reproduction of Visually Perceived Form. Journal of Experimental Psychology 15 (1):73.
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  24.  46
    R. D. Carmichael (1919). The Secret (Poem). The Monist 29 (3):404-405.
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  25.  34
    Peter A. Carmichael (1953). Professor Ayer on Individuals. Analysis 14 (2):37 - 42.
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  26.  16
    Montgomery Carmichael (1931). The Origins of the Discalced Carmelite Friars. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 6 (2):237-257.
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  27.  52
    Kenny R. Coventry, Richard Carmichael & Simon C. Garrod (1994). Spatial Prepositions, Object-Specific Function, and Task Requirements. Journal of Semantics 11 (4):289-309.
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  28.  11
    Peter A. Carmichael (1941). The Bertrand Russell Case. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 38 (21):573-581.
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  29.  14
    Peter A. Carmichael (1947). For Want of Reason and Ethics. Journal of Philosophy 44 (3):67-79.
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  30.  10
    Leonard Carmichael (1931). Traité de Psychologie. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 28 (19):531-531.
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  31.  9
    Leonard Carmichael (1931). Nouveau Traité de Psychologie. Vol. I. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 28 (19):529-531.
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  32.  9
    Robert D. Carmichael (1930). Proceedings of the First Indian Philosophical Congress Held in Calcutta University. The Monist 40 (4):640-640.
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  33.  12
    Peter A. Carmichael (1931). Reply to Mr. Gotshalk. The Monist 41 (2):304-307.
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  34.  11
    Montgomery Carmichael (1930). St. John of the Cross. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):374-395.
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  35.  21
    R. D. Carmichael (1925). Meaning in the Case of Mathematical Postulates. The Monist 35 (3):372-404.
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  36.  24
    Ann Carmichael (2003). Plague and More Plagues. Early Science and Medicine 8 (3):253-266.
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  37.  9
    Montgomery Carmichael (1932). St. Theresa and Her Prior General. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):240-261.
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  38.  9
    Peter A. Carmichael (1931). Change. The Monist 41 (2):282-291.
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  39.  17
    R. D. Carmichael (1924). The Structure of Exact Thought. The Monist 34 (1):63-95.
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  40.  20
    Montgomery Carmichael (1926). Miguel Molinos, Spanish Quietist. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):39-53.
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  41.  14
    Montgomery Carmichael (1930). The Layman. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):106-123.
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  42.  7
    R. D. Carmichael (1921). The Song of Fire. The Monist 31 (2):310-313.
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  43.  8
    Montgomery Carmichael (1927). Cardinal Piermatteo Petrucci. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):45-55.
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  44.  5
    H. Lorne Carmichael (1995). Cheaters Never Prosper, Sometimes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):549-550.
    In the Frank (1988) model, a small increase in the number of cheaters will soon be reversed. It is not clear that this prediction holds for sociopathy. There are also many attractive evolutionary models that do not admit a small, stable proportion of cheaters. Hence, without definitive evidence about the character of early human society, we cannot conclude that sociopathy has an evolutionary origin.
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  45.  26
    Alexander Broadie, Scottish Philosophy in the 18th Century. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Philosophy was at the core of the eighteenth century movement known as the Scottish Enlightenment. The movement included major figures, such as Francis Hutcheson, David Hume, Adam Smith, Thomas Reid and Adam Ferguson, and also many others who produced notable works, such as Gershom Carmichael, George Turnbull, George Campbell, James Beattie, Alexander Gerard, Henry Home (Lord Kames) and Dugald Stewart. I discuss some of the leading ideas of these thinkers, though paying less attention than I otherwise would to (...)
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  46.  5
    Leonard Carmichael (1935). Book Review:The Philosophy and Psychology of Sensation. Charles Hartshorne. [REVIEW] Ethics 45 (2):244-.
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  47.  5
    Peter A. Carmichael (1969). Based On. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 30 (1):113-115.
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  48.  5
    Sheena Carmichael (1992). Countering Employee Crime. Business Ethics 1 (3):180–184.
    Theft, grievances and absenteeism show the need to examine mutual loyalty and establish a‘win‐win’policy.
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    Mirsad Hadzikadic, Ted Carmichael & Charles Curtin (2010). Complex Adaptive Systems and Game Theory: An Unlikely Union. Complexity 16 (1):34-42.
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  50.  10
    Peter A. Carmichael (1951). Esthetic Contrast and Contradiction. Journal of Philosophy 48 (2):42-48.
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