17 found
Order:
  1.  21
    Gert J. J. Biesta (1998). Say You Want a Revolution... Suggestions for the Impossible Future of Critical Pedagogy. Educational Theory 48 (4):499-510.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   31 citations  
  2.  48
    Gert J. J. Biesta (2010). Why ‘What Works’ Still Won’T Work: From Evidence-Based Education to Value-Based Education. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (5):491-503.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  3.  53
    Gert J. J. Biesta (2004). Education, Accountability, and the Ethical Demand: Can the Democratic Potential of Accountability Be Regained? Educational Theory 54 (3):233-250.
    This paper analyzes the impact of the idea of accountability on education. It considers the kind of relationships that are promoted or produced by the culture of accountability, both in order to understand what kind of relationships are made possible and to understand what kind of relationships are made difficult, or even impossible, as a result of the accountability regime. The paper explores how the managerial uses of the idea of accountability have become pervasive in contemporary education and how this (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  4.  38
    Gert J. J. Biesta & Geert Jan J. M. Stams (2001). Critical Thinking and the Question of Critique: Some Lessons From Deconstruction. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (1):57-74.
    This article provides somephilosophical ``groundwork'' for contemporary debatesabout the status of the idea(l) of critical thinking.The major part of the article consists of a discussionof three conceptions of ``criticality,'' viz., criticaldogmatism, transcendental critique (Karl-Otto Apel),and deconstruction (Jacques Derrida). It is shown thatthese conceptions not only differ in their answer tothe question what it is ``to be critical.'' They alsoprovide different justifications for critique andhence different answers to the question what giveseach of them the ``right'' to be critical. It is arguedthat (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  5.  20
    Gert J. J. Biesta (1994). Education as Practical Intersubjectivity: Towards a Critical-Pragmatic Understanding of Education. Educational Theory 44 (3):299-317.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  6.  26
    Raf Vanderstraeten & Gert J. J. Biesta (2001). How is Education Possible? Preliminary Investigations for a Theory of Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 33 (1):7–21.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  7.  27
    Gert J. J. Biesta (1998). Mead, Intersubjectivity, and Education: The Early Writings. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (2/3):73-99.
    This article seeks to reconstruct the early writings of George Herbert Mead in order to explore the significance of his work for the development of an intersubjective conception of education. The reconstruction takes its point of departure in Mead's claim that reflective consciousness has a social situation as its precondition. In a mainly chronological account of Mead's writings on psychology and philosophy from the period 1900–1925, it is shown how Mead explains the social origin of conscious reflection and self-consciousness. It (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  8.  11
    Gert J. J. Biesta (1999). Radical Intersubjectivity: Reflections on the €œDifferent” Foundation of Education. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (4):203-220.
    This article addresses the question how educational theory can overcome the assumptions of the tradition of the philosophy of consciousness, a tradition which can be seen as the foundation of the modern project of education. While twentieth century philosophy has seen several attempts to make a shift from consciousness to intersubjectivity (Dewey, Wittgenstein, Habermas) it is argued that this shift still remains within the humanistic tradition of modern thought in that it still tries to define, still tries to develop a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  9.  15
    Gert J. J. Biesta (2001). How Difficult Should Education Be? Educational Theory 51 (4):385-400.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  10.  45
    Gert J. J. Biesta (2009). How to Use Pragmatism Pragmatically?: Suggestions for the Twenty-First Century. Education and Culture 25 (2):pp. 34-45.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  18
    Gert J. J. Biesta & Louis F. Mirón (2002). The New Discourses on Educational Leadership: An Introduction. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (2):101-107.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12.  5
    Gert J. J. Biesta (1999). Redefining the Subject, Redefining the Social, Reconsidering Education: George Herbert Mead's Course on Philosophy of Education at the University of Chicago. Educational Theory 49 (4):475-492.
  13.  17
    Gert J. J. Biesta & Siebren Miedema (2000). Context and Interaction. How to Assess Dewey's Influence on Educational Reform in Europe? Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (1):21-37.
    This article addresses somemethodological questions that are at stake inassessing the influence of the ideas of John Dewey onthe renewal of European education in the twentiethcentury, using examples from the history of Dutcheducation. It is argued that in this kind of researchthe focus should not be on the process of influence assuch, but rather on the activity of reception. This,in turn, requires a contextual reconstruction of theinteraction between Deweyan ideas and practices andexisting ones. The case studies presented in thisarticle exemplify (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14.  6
    Louis F. Mirón & Gert J. J. Biesta (2002). The Philosophy of Educational Leadership: Emerging Themes and Emerging Perspectives. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (2).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  12
    Gert J. J. Biesta (1996). Review Article on John Tiles' Dewey. Studies in Philosophy and Education 15 (4):383-394.
  16. Gert J. J. Biesta & Siebren Miedema (2000). Context and Interaction. How to Assess Dewey’s Influence on Educational Reform in Europe? Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (1-2):21-37.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  3
    Gert J. J. Biesta (2010). Review of Andrew Stables, Childhood and the Philosophy of Education: An Anti-Aristotelian Perspective. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (6):579-585.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography