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  1. Michael A. Arbib & Giacomo Rizzolatti (forthcoming). Neural Expectations: A Possible Evolutionary Path From Manual Skills to Language. Communication and Cognition.
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  2. Giacomo Rizzolatti (2014). Confounding the Origin and Function of Mirror Neurons. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):218-219.
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  3. Giacomo Rizzolatti & Maddalena Fabbri-Destro (2013). The Mirror Mechanism: Understanding Others From the Inside. In Simon Baron-Cohen, Michael Lombardo & Helen Tager-Flusberg (eds.), Understanding Other Minds: Perspectives From Developmental Social Neuroscience. Oup Oxford. 264.
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  4. Guy A. Orban & Giacomo Rizzolatti (2012). An Area Specifically Devoted to Tool Use in Human Left Inferior Parietal Lobule. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):234-234.
    A comparative fMRI study by Peeters et al. (2009) provided evidence that a specific sector of left inferior parietal lobule is devoted to tool use in humans, but not in monkeys. We propose that this area represents the neural substrate of the human capacity to understand tool use by using causal reasoning.
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  5. Corrado Sinigaglia & Giacomo Rizzolatti (2011). Through the Looking Glass: Self and Others. Cosciousness and Cognition 20 (1):64-74.
    In the present article we discuss the relevance of the mirror mechanism for our sense of self and our sense of others. We argue that, by providing us with an understanding from the inside of actions, the mirror mechanism radically challenges the traditional view of the self and of the others. Indeed, this mechanism not only reveals the common ground on the basis of which we become aware of ourselves as selves distinct from other selves, but also sheds new light (...)
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  6. Cinzia Di Dio, Nicola Canessa, Stefano F. Cappa & Giacomo Rizzolatti (2010). Specificity of Esthetic Experience for Artworks: An FMRI Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:139-139.
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  7. Giacomo Rizzolatti & Corrado Sinigaglia (2007). Mirrors in the Brain: How Our Minds Share Actions and Emotions. OUP Oxford.
    Emotions and actions are powerfully contagious; when we see someone laugh, cry, show disgust, or experience pain, in some sense, we share that emotion. When we see someone in distress, we share that distress. When we see a great actor, musician or sportsperson perform at the peak of their abilities, it can feel like we are experiencing just something of what they are experiencing. Yet only recently, with the discover of mirror neurons, has it become clear just how this powerful (...)
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  8. Laila Craighero & Giacomo Rizzolatti (2005). The Premotor Theory of Attention. In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press. 181--186.
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  9. Vittorio Gallese, Christian Keysers & Giacomo Rizzolatti (2004). Amygdala, Insula, and Selectivity for Particular Emotions. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (9):396-403.
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  10. Vittorio Gallese, Christian Keysers & Giacomo Rizzolatti (2004). A Unifying View of the Basis of Social Cognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (9):396-403.
    In this article we provide a unifying neural hypothesis on how individuals understand the actions and emotions of others. Our main claim is that the fundamental mechanism at the basis of the experiential understanding of others' actions is the activation of the mirror neuron system. A similar mechanism, but involving the activation of viscero-motor centers, underlies the experiential understanding of the emotions of others.
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  11. Giacomo Rizzolatti, Leonardo Fogassi & Vittorio Gállese (2004). 31 Cortical Mechanisms Subserving Object Grasping, Action Understanding, and Imitation. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. Mit Press. 427.
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  12. Giacomo Rizzolatti & Vittorio Gallese (2003). Mirror Neurons. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
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  13. Michael A. Arbib & Giacomo Rizzolatti (1999). 6 Neural Expectations. In Philip R. Loockvane (ed.), The Nature of Concepts: Evolution, Structure, and Representation. Routledge.
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  14. Giacomo Rizzolatti (1998). What Happened to Homo Habilis? (Language and Mirror Neurons). Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):527-528.
    The evolutionary continuity between the prespeech functions of premotor cortex and its new linguistic functions, the main thesis of MacNeilage's target article, is confirmed by the recent discovery of “mirror” neurons in monkeys and a corresponding action-observation/action-execution matching system in humans. Physiological data (and other considerations) appear to indicate, however, that brachiomanual gestures played a greater role in language evolution than MacNeilage would like to admit.
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  15. Giacomo Rizzolatti (1994). Nonconscious Motor Images. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):220.
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  16. Giacomo Rizzolatti & Rosolino Camarda (1987). Neural Circuits for Spatial Attention and Unilateral Neglect. In M. Jeannerod (ed.), Neurophysiological and Neuropsychological Aspects of Spatial Neglect. Elsevier Science Ltd. 45--289.
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  17. Giacomo Rizzolatti (1985). Free Will and Motor Subroutines: Too Much for a Small Area. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):597.
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