144 found
Order:
Disambiguations:
John Gibson [52]James Gibson [20]James J. Gibson [17]Joan McIver Gibson [9]
J. J. Gibson [8]J. Gibson [7]Joan Gibson [6]John B. Gibson [5]

Not all matches are shown. Search with initial or firstname to single out others.

See also:
Profile: John Gibson (University of Louisville)
Profile: Jennifer Gibson (University of Phoenix)
Profile: Jo Anna Gibson (University of Canberra)
Profile: Jim Gibson
Profile: James A. Gibson
  1. James J. Gibson (1979). The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception. Houghton Mifflin.
    And in the end I came to believe that the whole theory of depth perception was false. I suggested a new theory in a book on what I called the visual world ...
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1018 citations  
  2. James J. Gibson (1968). The Senses Considered As Perceptual Systems. Allen & Unwin.
  3.  21
    James J. Gibson (1950). The Perception Of The Visual World. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
  4.  48
    James J. Gibson (1967). New Reasons for Realism. Synthese 17 (1):162 - 172.
    Both the psychology of perception and the philosophy of perception seem to show a new face when the process is considered at its own level, distinct from that of sensation. Unfamiliar conceptions in physics, anatomy, physiology, psychology, and phenomenology are required to clarify the separation and make it plausible. But there have been so many dead ends in the effort to solve the theoretical problems of perception that radical proposals may now be acceptable. Scientists are often more conservative than philosophers (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   123 citations  
  5. John Gibson (2015). Introduction: The Place of Poetry in Contemporary Aesthetics. In The Philosophy of Poetry. Oxford University Press 1-16.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  50
    John Gibson (forthcoming). What Makes a Poem Philosophical? In Karen Zumhagen-Yekplé & Michael LeMahieu (eds.), Wittgenstein and Modernism. University of Chicago Press
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  74
    John Gibson (forthcoming). Interpretation, Literature and Meaning Skepticism. In Dirk-Martin Grube (ed.), Meaning and Interpretation. Brill
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. John Gibson (2008). Cognitivism and the Arts. Philosophy Compass 3 (4):573-589.
    Cognitivism in respect to the arts refers to a constellation of positions that share in common the idea that artworks often bear, in addition to aesthetic value, a significant kind of cognitive value. In this paper I concentrate on three things: (i) the challenge of understanding exactly what one must do if one wishes to defend a cognitivist view of the arts; (ii) common anti-cognitivist arguments; and (iii) promising recent attempts to defend cognitivism.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  9.  68
    John Gibson (2015). Empathy. In Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. Routledge 200-219.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. John Gibson (2012). Fiction and the Weave of Life. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Literary fiction is of crucial importance in human life. It is a source of understanding and insight into the nature of the human condition, yet ever since Plato, philosophers have struggled to provide a plausible explanation of how this can be the case. For surely the fictionality - the sheer invented character - of the literary text means that fiction presents not our world, but other worlds? In Fiction and the Weave of Life, John Gibson offers a novel and intriguing (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  11. James J. Gibson (1976). The Myth of Passive Perception: A Reply to Richards. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 37 (December):234-238.
  12. John Gibson & Simona Bertacco (2011). Skepticism and the Idea of an Other. In Bernie Rhei (ed.), Stanley Cavell and Literary Theory: Consequences of Skepticism. Continuum
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. John Gibson (2009). Literature and Knowledge. In Richard Eldridge (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press
    What is the relation between works of fiction and the acquisition of knowledge?
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  9
    Alison Thompson, Karen Faith, Jennifer Gibson & Ross Upshur (2006). Pandemic Influenza Preparedness: An Ethical Framework to Guide Decision-Making. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-11.
    Background Planning for the next pandemic influenza outbreak is underway in hospitals across the world. The global SARS experience has taught us that ethical frameworks to guide decision-making may help to reduce collateral damage and increase trust and solidarity within and between health care organisations. Good pandemic planning requires reflection on values because science alone cannot tell us how to prepare for a public health crisis. Discussion In this paper, we present an ethical framework for pandemic influenza planning. The ethical (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  15. John Gibson (2006). Interpreting Words, Interpreting Worlds. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):439–450.
    It is often assumed that literary meaning is essentially linguistic in nature and that literary interpretation is therefore a purely linguistic affair. This essay identifies a variety of literary meaning that cannot be reduced to linguistic meaning. Meaning of this sort is generated not by a communicative act so much as through a creative one: the construction of a fictional world. The way in which a fictional world can bear meaning turns out to be strikingly unlike the way a sentence (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  16.  68
    James J. Gibson (1969). Are There Sensory Qualities of Objects? Synthese 19 (April):408-409.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   30 citations  
  17. John Gibson (2003). Between Truth and Triviality. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (3):224-237.
    A viable theory of literary humanism must do justice to the idea that literature offers cognitive rewards to the careful reader. There are, however, powerful arguments to the effect that literature is at best only capable of offering idle visions of a world already well known. In this essay I argue that there is a form of cognitive awareness left unmentioned in the traditional vocabulary of knowledge acquisition, a form of awareness literature is particularly capable of offering. Thus even if (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18.  26
    John Gibson (2014). Narrative and the Literary Imagination. In Allen Speight (ed.), Narrative, Philosophy & Life. Springer 135-50.
    This paper attempts to reconcile two apparently opposed ways of thinking about the imagination and its relationship to literature, one which casts it as essentially concerned with fiction-making and the other with culture-making. The literary imagination’s power to create fictions is what gives it its most obvious claim to “autonomy”, as Kant would have it: its freedom to venture out in often wild and spectacular excess of reality. The argument of this paper is that we can locate the literary imagination’s (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. John Gibson (2013). What Do Humanists Want? In P. Hanna (ed.), Reality and Culture: Essays on the Philosophy of Bernard Harrison. Rodopi
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  1
    D. S. Silva, J. L. Gibson, R. Sibbald, E. Connolly & P. A. Singer (2008). Clinical Ethicists' Perspectives on Organisational Ethics in Healthcare Organisations. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):320-323.
    Background: Demand for organisational ethics capacity is growing in health organisations, particularly among managers. The role of clinical ethicists in, and perspective on, organisational ethics has not been well described or documented in the literature.Objective: To describe clinical ethicists’ perspectives on organisational ethics issues in their hospitals, their institutional role in relation to organisational ethics, and their perceived effectiveness in helping to address organisational ethics issues.Design and Setting: Qualitative case study involving semi-structured interviews with 18 clinical ethicists across 13 health (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  21.  4
    Eleanor J. Gibson, James J. Gibson, Olin W. Smith & Howard Flock (1959). Motion Parallax as a Determinant of Perceived Depth. Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (1):40.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   33 citations  
  22.  5
    James J. Gibson & Eleanor J. Gibson (1957). Continuous Perspective Transformations and the Perception of Rigid Motion. Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (2):129.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   32 citations  
  23.  19
    John Gibson (2007). Fiction and the Weave of Life. Oxford University Press.
    Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes 1 kapitel eller op til 5% af teksten.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  24.  3
    Kai Von Fieandt & James J. Gibson (1959). The Sensitivity of the Eye to Two Kinds of Continuous Transformation of a Shadow-Pattern. Journal of Experimental Psychology 57 (5):344.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   30 citations  
  25.  26
    John Gibson (forthcoming). Professor. In Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. Routledge
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  10
    Jennifer L. Gibson & Ross E. G. Upshur (2012). Ethics and Chronic Disease: Where Are the Bioethicists? Bioethics 26 (5):ii-iv.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  27.  9
    D. S. Silva, J. L. Gibson, R. Sibbald, E. Connolly & P. A. Singer (2008). Clinical Ethicists' Perspectives on Organisational Ethics in Healthcare Organisations. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):320-323.
    Background: Demand for organisational ethics capacity is growing in health organisations, particularly among managers. The role of clinical ethicists in, and perspective on, organisational ethics has not been well described or documented in the literature. Objective: To describe clinical ethicists’ perspectives on organisational ethics issues in their hospitals, their institutional role in relation to organisational ethics, and their perceived effectiveness in helping to address organisational ethics issues. Design and Setting: Qualitative case study involving semi-structured interviews with 18 clinical ethicists across (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  28.  2
    J. J. Gibson & M. Radner (1937). Adaptation, After-Effect and Contrast in the Perception of Tilted Lines. I. Quantitative Studies. Journal of Experimental Psychology 20 (5):453.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   39 citations  
  29.  97
    John Gibson (2012). Selves on Selves: The Philosophical Significance of Autobiography. Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (4):109-119.
    Philosophers of literature do not take much of an interest in autobiography.1 In one sense this is not surprising. As a certain prejudice has it, autobiography is, along with biography, the preferred reading of people who do not really like to read. The very words can conjure up images of what one finds on bookshelves in Florida retirement communities and in underfunded public libraries, books with titles like Under the Rainbow: The Real Liza Minnelli or Me: Stories of My Life (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  3
    John Gibson (2016). YABLO, STEPHEN. Aboutness. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2014, Xi + 221 Pp., $45.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):206-208.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  12
    J. W. Ross, J. W. Glaser, D. Rasinski-Gregory, J. M. Gibson, C. Bayley & Giles R. Scofield (1994). Health Care Ethics Committees: The Next Generation. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 6 (3):157-162.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  32.  6
    J. J. Gibson, E. G. Jack & G. Raffel (1932). Bilateral Transfer of the Conditioned Response in the Human Subject. Journal of Experimental Psychology 15 (4):416.
  33.  1
    J. J. Gibson & L. Hudson (1935). Bilateral Transfer of the Conditioned Knee-Jerk. Journal of Experimental Psychology 18 (6):774.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   31 citations  
  34.  58
    James A. Gibson (2014). Anselm on Freedom and Grace. Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 5:88-121.
    The chapter presents Anselm’s incompatibilist account of human freedom within the context of his theodicy and presents two arguments against his account. Both arguments aim to show there is a genuine conflict between his account of freedom and the role of God’s grace in making agents just. The first argument, the problem of harmonization, highlights the conflict within the soteriological context where an agent changes from being unjust to being just. The second argument, the problem of just creation, highlights the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  63
    John Gibson (2013). Representation and the Novel. The Henry James Review 34 (3):220-231.
  36.  1
    Joan Mclver Gibson & Thomasine Kimbrough Kushner (1986). Will the “Conscience of an Institution” Become Society's Servant? Hastings Center Report 16 (3):9-11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  37.  10
    Mary Beth West & Joan McIver Gibson (1992). Facilitating Medical Ethics Case Review: What Ethics Committees Can Learn From Mediation and Facilitation Techniques. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (1):63.
    Medical ethics committees are increasingly called on to assist doctors, patients, and families in resolving difficult ethics issues. Although committees are becoming more sophisticated in the substance of medical ethics, little attention has been given to the processes these committees use to facilitate decision-making. In 1990, the National Institute for Dispute Resolution in Washington, D.C., provided a planning grant from its Innovation Fund to the Institute of Public Law of the University of New Mexico School of Law to look at (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  38.  13
    James J. Gibson (2002). A Theory of Direct Visual Perception. In A. Noe & E. Thompson (eds.), Vision and Mind: Selected Readings in the Philosophy of Perception. MIT Press 77--89.
  39.  30
    James Gibson (1923). Critical Notice. Mind 32 (127):246-264.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  7
    J. Gibson, D. Godkin, S. Tracy & S. MacRae (2008). Innovative Strategies to Improve Effectiveness in Clinical Ethics. In Peter A. Singer & A. M. Viens (eds.), The Cambridge Textbook of Bioethics. Cambridge University Press
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41.  22
    James J. Gibson (1975). Events Are Perceivable but Time is Not. In J. T. Fraser & Nathaniel M. Lawrence (eds.), The Study of Time Ii. Springer-Verlag 295--301.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  42.  6
    R. Abdool, M. Szego, D. Buchman, L. Justason, S. Bean, A. Heesters, H. Kaufman, B. Parke, F. Wagner & J. Gibson (forthcoming). Difficult Healthcare Transitions: Ethical Analysis and Policy Recommendations for Unrepresented Patients. Nursing Ethics.
  43.  58
    John Gibson (2011). Thick Narratives. In John Gibson Noel Carroll (ed.), Narrative, Emotion, and Insight. PSUP 69.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  11
    Joan McIver Gibson (1995). Response of the St. Joseph Healthcare System Ethics Committee (Albuquerque, NM). HEC Forum 7 (1):46-47.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  4
    Joan Gibson (2006). The Logic of Chastity: Women, Sex, and the History of Philosophy in the Early Modern Period. Hypatia 21 (4):1-19.
  46. John H. Gibson (1993). Performance Versus Results a Critique of Values in Contemporary Sport. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  47.  11
    John Gibson (ed.) (2004). The Literary Wittgenstein. Routledge.
    Amid growing recognition that Wittgenstein's philosophy has important implications for literary studies, this book brings together twenty-one articles by the ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48. John Gibson & Wolfgang Huemer (eds.) (2004). The Literary Wittgenstein. Routledge.
    _The Literary Wittgenstein_ is a stellar collection of articles relating the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein to core problems in the theory and philosophy of literature. Amid growing recognition that Wittgenstein's philosophy has important implications for literary studies, this book brings together twenty-one articles by the most prominent figures in the field. Eighteen of the articles are published here for the first time. _The Literary Wittgenstein_ applies the approach of Wittgenstein to core areas of literary theory, including poetry, deconstruction, the ethical (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49. John Gibson (2002). Martin Morris, Rethinking the Communicative Turn: Adorno, Habermas and the Problem of Communicative Freedom. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 22 (6):428-429.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  16
    John Gibson (2002). The Threat of Panfictionalism. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 6 (1):37-44.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 144