10 found
Sort by:
  1. Gil Anidjar (2013). Jesus and Monotheism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (S1):158-183.
    From Oedipus to Moses and beyond, Freud's last book has been read with singular obstinacy as addressing a Jewish (or anti-Semitic) question, or as renewing a religious (or antireligious) agenda. Between Athens and Jerusalem, from Judaism to a more general “monotheistic religion,” and from Oedipus (the son) to Moses (the father), scholars have explored or refuted numerous traces the primal murder left and many among the founding fathers, the substitutes to which it gave rise. Yet it is easy to see (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Gil Anidjar (2013). Of Globalatinology. Derrida Today 6 (1):11-22.
    Have we ever been religious? It may seem strange to open an essay on Derrida with a Latourean question. Yet, with regard to religion, what Derrida demonstrates is quite unavoidably this: we have long been, and are still being, Christianized. Whatever else we may have been, perhaps still are, constitutes but the space or espacement offered or relinquished, however reluctantly or even grudgingly (though more often than not quite willingly) to Christianization. This is a space that goes beyond whatever is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Gil Anidjar (2011). The Meaning of Life. Critical Inquiry 37 (4):697-723.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Gil Anidjar (2006). Secularism. Critical Inquiry 33 (1):52-77.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Gil Anidjar (2006). Traité de Tous les Noms (What Is Called Naming). Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):287-301.
    What’s in a name after Derrida? What’s in a name after all? What is a name such that it always already remains, after all is said and done? And who or what is itthat one calls name, names, or by name? Is it possible (for anyone or anything) not to have a name of one’s own? Or to have another? The same as another? Is it possible to call and recall, in the name of memory and remembrance, indifference or convention, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Gil Anidjar (2005). Christians and Money. Ethical Perspectives 12 (4):497-519.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Gil Anidjar (2005). Hosting. In Yvonne Sherwood & Kevin Hart (eds.), Derrida and Religion: Other Testaments. Routledge.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Gil anidjar (2004). On Cultural Survival. Angelaki 9 (2):5 – 15.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Gil Anidjar (ed.) (2002). Acts of Religion.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Gil Anidjar (2002). "Our Place in Al-Andalus": Kabbalah, Philosophy, Literature in Arab Jewish Letters. Stanford University Press.
    The year 1492 is only the last in a series of “ends” that inform the representation of medieval Spain in modern Jewish historical and literary discourses. These ends simultaneously mirror the traumas of history and shed light on the discursive process by which hermetic boundaries are set between periods, communities, and texts. This book addresses the representation of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries as the end of al-Andalus (Islamic Spain). Here, the end works to locate and separate Muslim from Christian (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation