Search results for 'Gillian Russell with John Doris' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  96
    Gillian K. Russell & John M. Doris (2008). Knowledge by Indifference. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (3):429 – 437.
    Is it harder to acquire knowledge about things that really matter to us than it is to acquire knowledge about things we don't much care about? Jason Stanley 2005 argues that whether or not the relational predicate 'knows that' holds between an agent and a proposition can depend on the practical interests of the agent: the more it matters to a person whether p is the case, the more justification is required before she counts as knowing that p. The evidence (...)
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  2. Gillian Russell with John Doris, Knowledge by Indifference.
    Is it harder to acquire knowledge about things that really matter to us than it is to acquire knowledge about things we don’t much care about? Jason Stanley (2005) argues that whether or not the relational predicate “knows that” holds between an agent and a proposition can depend on the practical interests of the agent: the more it matters to a person whether p is the case, the more justification is required before she counts as knowing that p.2 In Stanley’s (...)
     
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  3. Bertrand Russell (1959). Wisdom of the West a Historical Survey of Western Philosophy in its Social and Political Setting. Editor: Paul Foulkes. Designer: Edward Wright. With ten Compositions by John Piper. [REVIEW] Doubleday.
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  4.  73
    Nomy Arpaly & John Doris (2005). Review: Comments on "Lack of Character" by John Doris. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (3):643-647.
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  5. John M. Doris (2015). Talking to Our Selves: Reflection, Ignorance, and Agency. OUP Oxford.
    Do we know what we're doing, and why? Psychological research seems to suggest not: reflection and self-awareness are surprisingly uncommon and inaccurate. John M. Doris presents a new account of agency and responsibility, which reconciles our understanding of ourselves as moral agents with empirical work on the unconscious mind.
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  6.  32
    Gillian Kay Russell (2008). Truth in Virtue of Meaning. Oxford University Press.
    The analytic/synthetic distinction looks simple. It is a distinction between two different kinds of sentence. Synthetic sentences are true in part because of the way the world is, and in part because of what they mean. Analytic sentences - like all bachelors are unmarried and triangles have three sides - are different. They are true in virtue of meaning, so no matter what the world is like, as long as the sentence means what it does, it will be true. -/- (...)
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  7.  15
    L. J. Russell (1938). A Critical Exposition of the Philosophy of Leibniz. By Bertrand Russell, New Impression with a New Preface (London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd.1937. Pp. Xxiii + 311. Price 12s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 13 (50):217-.
  8. Bertrand Russell, Berry Feinberg & Ronald Kasrils (1970). Dear Bertrand Russell ... A Selection of His Correspondence with the General Public, 1950-1968.
     
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  9. Gillian Russell (2008). Truth in Virtue of Meaning: A Defence of the Analytic/Synthetic Distinction. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The distinction between analytic and synthetic sentences - the idea that some sentences are true or false just in virtue of what they mean - is a famous focus of philosophical controversy. Gillian Russell reinvigorates the debate with a challenging new defence of the distinction, showing that it is compatible with semantic externalism.
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  10. Bertrand Russell (1997). The Problems of Philosophy. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Bertrand Russell was one of the greatest logicians since Aristotle, and one of the most important philosophers of the past two hundred years. As we approach the 125th anniversary of the Nobel laureate's birth, his works continue to spark debate, resounding with unmatched timeliness and power. The Problems of Philosophy, one of the most popular works in Russell's prolific collection of writings, has become core reading in philosophy. Clear and accessible, this little book is an intelligible and (...)
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  11. Bertrand Russell (1996). Foundations of Geometry. Routledge.
    The Foundations of Geometry was first published in 1897, and is based on Russell's Cambridge dissertation as well as lectures given during a journey through the USA. This is the first reprint, complete with a new introduction by John Slater. It provides both an insight into the foundations of Russell's philosophical thinking and an introduction to the philosophy of mathematics and logic. As such it will be an invaluable resource not only for students of philosophy, but (...)
     
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  12. Bertrand Russell (1996). Mortals and Others, Volume I: American Essays 1931-1935. Routledge.
    This collection of essays and journalism cover a wide range of topics, from balancing prosperity and public expenditure or the mental differences between boys and girls to 'who may use lipstick'. Mortal and Others shows the serious and non-serious side of Russell's personality and work. It provides a lively and revealing introduction to Russell's thought for all readers. First published in 1975, Mortals and Others is at last available in paperback with a new introduction by John (...)
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  13. Bertrand Russell (2013). Mortals and Others, Volume I: American Essays 1931-1935. Routledge.
    This collection of essays and journalism cover a wide range of topics, from balancing prosperity and public expenditure or the mental differences between boys and girls to 'who may use lipstick'. _Mortal and Others_ shows the serious and non-serious side of Russell's personality and work. It provides a lively and revealing introduction to Russell's thought for all readers. First published in 1975, _Mortals and Others_ is at last available in paperback with a new introduction by John (...)
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  14. Wesley J. Wildman & Robert John Russell (1995). Chaos: A Mathematical Introduction with Philosophical Reflections. In R. J. Russell, N. Murphy & A. R. Peacocke (eds.), Chaos and Complexity. Vatican Observatory Publications
     
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  15.  10
    D. Gwyn Seymour, Anne E. Ball, Elizabeth M. Russell, William R. Primrose, Andrew M. Garratt & John R. Crawford (2001). Problems in Using Health Survey Questionnaires in Older Patients with Physical Disabilities. The Reliability and Validity of the SF‐36 and the Effect of Cognitive Impairment. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 7 (4):411-418.
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  16.  7
    John E. Russell (1906). Some Difficulties with the Epistemology of Pragmatism and Radical Empiricism. Philosophical Review 15 (4):406-413.
  17.  25
    Robert John Russell (2010). Cosmology From Alpha to Omega: Response to Reviews. Zygon 45 (1):237-250.
    I gratefully acknowledge and respond here to four reviews of my recent book, Cosmology from Alpha to Omega. Nancey Murphy stresses the importance of showing consistency between Christian theology and natural science through a detailed examination of my recent model of their creative interaction. She suggests how this model can be enhanced by adopting Alasdair MacIntyre's understanding of tradition in order to adjudicate between competing ways of incorporating science into a wider worldview. She urges the inclusion of ethics in my (...)
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  18.  11
    Robert John Russell (2012). Eschatology and Scientific Cosmology: From Deadlock to Interaction. Zygon 47 (4):997-1014.
    Among the many scholarly surveys of historical and contemporary approaches to Christian eschatology, few treat the relation between eschatology and scientific cosmology. It is the purpose of this essay to do so. I begin with a brief summary of the importance of eschatology to contemporary Christian theology. Next, an overview is given of scientific cosmology, its earlier scenarios for the cosmic far future of “freeze or fry,” and, more recently the discovery that the expansion of the universe is accelerating. (...)
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  19.  40
    Bertrand Russell (1987). Bertrand Russell on Ethics, Sex, and Marriage. Prometheus Books.
    During his long life (1872-1970) Bertrand Russell was one of a handful of social thinkers, let alone internationally recognized philosophers, whose views on contemporary issues won for him a devoted and supportive audience on the one hand and a host of vituperative critics on the other. Russell's revolutionary writings frequently placed him in the center of controversy with conservatives and all those who were unwilling to consider moral questions from a rational rather than an emotional stance. -/- (...)
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  20.  41
    Bertrand Russell (1999). Russell on Religion: Selections From the Writings of Bertrand Russell. Routledge.
    Russell on Religion presents a comprehensive and accessible selection of Bertrand Russell's writing on religion and related topics from the turn of the century to the end of his life. The influence of religion pervades almost all Bertrand Russell's writings from his mathematical treatises to his early fiction. This comprehensive selection of writings offers a clear overview of the development of his thinking about religion. Russell contends with religion as a philosopher, historian, social critic and (...)
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  21.  2
    Bertrand Russell (1900). A Critical Exposition of the Philosophy of Leibniz, with an Appendix of Leading Passages. Cambridge University Press.
    This book provides the original text of A Critical Exposition of the Philosophy of Leibniz, which was first published in 1900. An example of Russell's early thought, the work took particular inspiration from the letters to Arnauld and the Discours de Métaphysique in developing a comprehensive theory of Leibniz's system. The text of the first edition is provided in its entirety, including an appendix containing extracts from Leibniz, classified according to subject. This book will be of value to anyone (...)
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  22. Bertrand Russell (2014). The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell, Volume 5: Toward Principia Mathematica, 1905–08. Routledge.
    This volume of Bertrand Russell's Collected Papers finds Russell focused on writing Principia Mathematica during 1905–08. Eight previously unpublished papers shed light on his different versions of a substitutional theory of logic, with its elimination of classes and relations, during 1905-06. A recurring issue for him was whether a type hierarchy had to be part of a substitutional theory. In mid-1907 he began writing up the final version of Principia , now using a ramified theory of types, (...)
     
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  23. Bertrand Russell (1997). The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell, Volume 11: Last Philosophical Testament 1947-68. Routledge.
    This volume collects together Russell's philosophical writings during the period from 1947-68. For about half of this period Russell worked steadily at philosophy but after the publication of My Philosophical Development in 1959 he retired from academic philosophy for the second time. After that date, only the occasional philosophical piece appeared, as he was preoccupied with political writings. In this volume there are a handful of papers dated later than 1959, and all of these were certainly written (...)
     
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  24. Bertrand Russell (2008). The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell Volume 21: How to Keep the Peace: The Pacifist Dilemma, 1935–38. Routledge.
    In Collected Papers 21 Bertrand Russell grapples with the dilemma that confronted all opponents of militarism and war in the 1930s—namely, what was the most politically and morally appropriate response to international aggression. How to Keep the Peace contains some of Russell’s best-known essays, such as the famous Auto-obituary and his treatment of The Superior Virtue of the Oppressed . Like the sixteen previous volumes in Routledge’s critical edition of Russell’s shorter writings, however, Collected Papers 21 (...)
     
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  25. Bertrand Russell (2005). The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell Volume 29: Détente or Destruction, 1955-57. Routledge.
    Détente or Destruction, 1955-57 continues publication of Routledge's multi-volume critical edition of Bertrand Russell's shorter writings. Between September 1955 and November 1957 Russell published some sixty-one articles, reviews, statements, contributions to books and letters to editors, over fifty of which are contained in this volume. The texts, several of them hitherto unpublished, reveal the deepening of Russell's commitment to the anti-nuclear struggle, upon which he embarked in the previous volume of Collected Papers ( Man's Peril, 1954-55 ). (...)
     
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  26.  1
    James Simpson (2002). John Gower, Confessio Amantis, Russell A. Peck. With Latin Translations by Andrew Galloway.(Middle English Texts.) Kalamazoo, Mich.: Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, for TEAMS in Association with the University of Rochester, 2000. Paper. Pp. Xii, 363; 5 Black-and-White Figures. [REVIEW] Speculum 77 (3):921-923.
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  27.  3
    D. D. Todd (2007). In the Agora: The Public Face of Canadian Philosophy Andrew D. Irvine and John S. Russell, Editors With a Foreword by John Ralston Saul Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2006, Xxvi + 486 Pp., $75.00, $32.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 46 (04):814-.
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  28.  10
    Klaus Nürnberger (2012). Eschatology and Entropy: An Alternative to Robert John Russell's Proposal. Zygon 47 (4):970-996.
    Traditional eschatology clashes with the theory of entropy. Trying to bridge the gap, Robert John Russell assumes that theology and science are based on contradictory, yet equally valid, metaphysical assumptions, each one capable of questioning and impacting the other. The author doubts that Russell's proposal will convince empirically oriented scientists and attempts to provide a viable alternative. Historical‐critical analysis suggests that biblical future expectations were redemptive responses to changing human needs. Apocalyptic visions were occasioned by (...)
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  29.  31
    Nancey Murphy (2010). Robert John Russell Versus the New Atheists. Zygon 45 (1):193-212.
    This essay compares Robert John Russell's work in his recent book Cosmology from Alpha to Omega: The Creative Mutual Interaction of Theology and Science (2008) to that of the authors known collectively as "the new atheists." I treat the latter as recent contributors to the modern tradition of scientific naturalism. This tradition makes claims to legitimacy on the basis of its close relations to the natural sciences. The purpose of this essay is to show up the poverty of (...)
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  30.  14
    Richard F. Kitchener (2004). Bertrand Russell's Flirtation with Behaviorism. Behavior and Philosophy 32 (2):273 - 291.
    Although numerous aspects of Bertrand Russell's philosophical views have been discussed, his views about the nature of the mind and the place of psychology within modern science have received less attention. In particular, there has been little discussion of what I will call "Russell's flirtation with behaviorism." Although some individuals have mentioned this phase in Russell's philosophical career, they have not adequately situated it within Russell's changing philosophical views, in particular, his naturalistic epistemology. I briefly (...)
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  31. Peter B. M. Vranas, Comments on Greg Restall & Gillian Russell's “Barriers to Implication”.
    I was quite excited when I first read Restall and Russell’s (2010) paper. For two reasons. First, because the paper provides rigorous formulations and formal proofs of implication barrier the- ses, namely “theses [which] deny that one can derive sentences of one type from sentences of another”. Second (and primarily), because the paper proves a general theorem, the Barrier Con- struction Theorem, which unifies implication barrier theses concerning four topics: generality, necessity, time, and normativity. After thinking about the paper, (...)
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  32. Brian Patrick Hendley, George Kimball Plochmann & Robert S. Brumbaugh (2010). Dewey, Russell, Whitehead: Philosophers as Educators. Southern Illinois University Press.
    In _Philosophers as Educators_ Brian Patrick Hendley argues that philosophers of edu­cation should reject their preoccupation with defining terms and analyzing concepts and embrace the philosophical task of con­structing general theories of education. Hendley discusses in detail the educational philosophies of John Dewey, Bertrand Rus­sell, and Alfred North Whitehead. He sees in these men excellent role models that contem­porary philosophers might well follow. Hendley believes that, like these men­tors, philosophers should take a more ac­tive, practical role in education. (...)
     
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  33.  11
    John Dillon (1992). Gillian Clark (Tr.): Iamblichus, On the Pythagorean Life. Translated with Notes and Introduction. (Translated Texts for Historians, 8.) Pp. Xxi + 122; 2 Maps. Liverpool University Press, 1989. Paper, £8.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (01):186-187.
  34.  6
    Russell M. Dancy (1966). Frederick J. E. Woodbridge, Aristotle's Vision of Nature. Edited with an Introduction by John Hermann Randall Jr., with the Assistance of Charles H. Kahn and Harold A. Larrabee. New York and London: Columbia University Press, 1965. [REVIEW] Dialogue 5 (2):272-276.
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  35. Christian Miller (2003). Social Psychology and Virtue Ethics. Journal of Ethics 7 (4):365-392.
    Several philosophers have recently claimed to have discovered a new and rather significant problem with virtue ethics. According to them, virtue ethics generates certain expectations about the behavior of human beings which are subject to empirical testing. But when the relevant experimental work is done in social psychology, the results fall remarkably short of meeting those expectations. So, these philosophers think, despite its recent success, virtue ethics has far less to offer to contemporary ethical theory than might have been (...)
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  36.  86
    Anna Marmodoro (2011). Moral Character Versus Situations: An Aristotelian Contribution to the Debate. Journal of Ancient Philosophy 5 (2).
    In everyday life we assume substantial behavioural reliability in others, and on the basis of it we talk of people as acting “in character” and “out of character”. This common assumption seems intuitively well founded. But recent experiments in social psychology have generated philosophical controversy around it. In the context of this debate, John Doris challenges Aristotle’s well known and influential view that people’s behavioural reliability with respect to acting virtuously is underpinned by character traits, understood as (...)
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  37.  31
    Travis J. Rodgers & Brandon Warmke (2015). Situationism Versus Situationism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (1):9-26.
    Most discussions of John Doris’s situationism center on what can be called descriptive situationism, the claim that our folk usage of global personality and character traits in describing and predicting human behavior is empirically unsupported. Philosophers have not yet paid much attention to another central claim of situationism, which says that given that local traits are empirically supported, we can more successfully act in line with our moral values if, in our deliberation about what to do, we (...)
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  38.  6
    David McPherson & John Cottingham (2012). Philosophy, Spirituality, and the Good Life: An Interview with John Cottingham. Philosophy and Theology 24 (1):85-111.
    This interview with John Cottingham explores some major themes in his recent work in moral philosophy and the philosophy of religion. It begins by discussing his views on the task of philosophy and focuses particularly on philosophy’s role in achieving an overall view of the world and for understanding and achieving the good life. It also discusses some ‘limits of philosophy’ with respect to understanding and achieving the good life; i.e., some ways in which philosophical reflection on (...)
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  39. Andy Taylor (2010). Moral Responsibility and Subverting Causes. Dissertation, University of Reading
    I argue against two of the most influential contemporary theories of moral responsibility: those of Harry Frankfurt and John Martin Fischer. Both propose conditions which are supposed to be sufficient for direct moral responsibility for actions. (By the term direct moral responsibility, I mean moral responsibility which is not traced from an earlier action.) Frankfurt proposes a condition of 'identification'; Fischer, writing with Mark Ravizza, proposes conditions for 'guidance control'. I argue, using counterexamples, that neither is (...)
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  40.  31
    Manuel García-Carpintero (2012). Vindicating Analyticity: Critical Notice of Truth in Virtue of Meaning, by Gillian Russell. Disputatio 4 (33).
    Critical review of Gillian Russell's "Truth in Virtue of Meaning".
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  41. Paulo Faria (2010). Memory as Acquaintance with the Past: Some Lessons From Russell, 1912-1914. Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 51 (121):149-172.
    Russell’s theory of memory as acquaintance with the past seems to square uneasily with his definition of acquaintance as the converse of the relation of presentation of an object to a subject. We show how the two views can be made to cohere under a suitable construal of ‘presentation’, which has the additional appeal of bringing Russell’s theory of memory closer to contemporary views on direct reference and object-dependent thinking than is usually acknowledged. The drawback is (...)
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  42.  25
    Silke Ackermann & Louise Devoy (2012). 'The Lord of the Smoking Mirror': Objects Associated with John Dee in the British Museum. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (3):539-549.
    Six objects associated with the magic practices of John Dee have been held within the collections of the British Museum for many decades. These objects include three wax seals, an obsidian mirror, a gold disc and a crystal ball. In this paper we review the provenance and possible association of these artefacts with Dee by comparing their features to the descriptions and diagrams set out in Dee’s manuscripts. Although we come to the conclusion that a direct link (...)
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  43.  36
    Shannon Sullivan (2000). Reconfiguring Gender with John Dewey: Habit, Bodies, and Cultural Change. Hypatia 15 (1):23-42.
    : This paper demonstrates how John Dewey's notion of habit can help us understand gender as a constitutive structure of bodily existence. Bringing Dewey's pragmatism in conjunction with Judith Butler's concept of performativity, I provide an account of how rigid binary configurations of gender might be transformed at the level of both individual habit and cultural construct.
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  44.  3
    Elizabeth Ramsden Eames (2013). Bertrand Russell's Dialogue with His Contemporaries. Routledge.
    First published in 1989, this book considers Bertrand Russell’s philosophy through his correspondence with others. Indeed, his exchanges with his elders in philosophy, with his contemporaries, and with one of his most outstanding pupils are brought to life in this judicious exposition: meticulously documented before being judged with insight and sympathy, as well as impartiality. Elizabeth Ramsden Eames here explores the issues that emerged from Russell’s exchanges with certain other philosophers, and interprets (...)
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  45.  4
    Kevin Klement (2001). Russell on `Disambiguating with the Grain'. Russell 21 (2).
    Fregeans face the difficulty finding a notation for distinguishing statements about the sense or meaning of an expression as opposed to its reference or denotation. Famously, in "On Denoting", Russell rejected methods that begin with an expression designating its denotation, and then alter it with a "the meaning of" operator to designate the meaning. Such methods attempt an impossible "backward road" from denotation to meaning. Contemporary neo-Fregeans, however, have suggested that we can disambiguate with, rather than (...)
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  46. John Gardner & Allan Richard Chavkin (1990). Conversations with John Gardner.
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  47. John W. Yolton (1977). The Locke Reader: Selections From the Works of John Locke with a General Introduction and Commentary. Cambridge University Press.
    John Yolton seeks to allow readers of Locke to have accessible in one volume sections from a wide range of Locke's books, structured so that some of the interconnections of his thought can be seen and traced. Although Locke did not write from a system of philosophy, he did have in mind an overall division of human knowledge. The readings begin with Locke's essay on Hermeneutics and the portions of his Essay Concerning Human Understanding on how to read (...)
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  48.  25
    Gregory Landini (2007). Wittgenstein's Apprenticeship with Russell. Cambridge University Press.
    Wittgenstein's Tractatus has generated many interpretations since its publication in 1921, but over the years a consensus has developed concerning its criticisms of Russell’s philosophy. In Wittgenstein’s Apprenticeship with Russell, Gregory Landini draws extensively from his work on Russell’s unpublished manuscripts to show that the consensus characterizes Russell with positions he did not hold. Using a careful analysis of Wittgenstein’s writings he traces the Doctrine of Showing and the ‘fundamental idea’ of the Tractatus to (...)
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  49. Tim Thornton (2004). John Mcdowell. Routledge.
    John McDowell's contribution to philosophy has ranged across Greek philosophy, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, metaphysics and ethics. His writings have drawn on the works of, amongst others, Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Sellars, and Davidson. His contributions have made him one of the most widely read, discussed and challenging philosophers writing today. This book provides a careful account of the main claims that McDowell advances in a number of different areas of philosophy. The interconnections (...)
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  50. Charles Wallace (2003). Eating and Drinking with John Wesley: The Logic of His Practice. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 85 (2):137-155.
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