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  1. Debra R. Comer & Gina Vega (2008). Using the PET Assessment Instrument to Help Students Identify Factors That Could Impede Moral Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):129 - 145.
    We present an instrument developed to explain to students the concept of the personal ethical threshold (PET). The PET represents an individual’s susceptibility to situational pressure in his or her organization that makes moral behavior more personally difficult. Further, the PET varies according to the moral intensity of the issue at hand, such that individuals are less vulnerable to situational pressure for issues of high moral intensity, i.e., those with greater consequences for others. A higher PET reflects an individual’s greater (...)
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  2. Debra R. Comer & Gina Vega (2005). An Experiential Exercise That Introduces the Concept of the Personal Ethical Threshold to Develop Moral Courage. Journal of Business Ethics Education 2 (2):171-197.
    This paper presents an experiential exercise introducing the concept of the personal ethical threshold (PET) to help explain why moral behavior does not always follow moral intention. An individual’s PET represents the individual’s vulnerability to situational factors, i.e., how little or much it takes for members of organizations to cross their proverbial line to act in a way they deem unethical. The PET reflects the interplay among the situation, the particular ethical issue, and the individual. Exploring the PET can help (...)
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  3. Judith W. Spain & Gina Vega (2005). Sony Online Entertainment: Everquest®or Evercrack? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):3 - 6.
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  4. Gina Vega (2005). Workers of the World—Relax! Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (2):349-352.
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  5. Gina Vega & Debra R. Comer (2005). Sticks and Stones May Break Your Bones, but Words Can Break Your Spirit: Bullying in the Workplace. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):101 - 109.
    Workplace bullying has a well-established body of research internationally, but the United States has lagged behind the rest of the world in the identification and investigation of this phenomenon. This paper presents a managerial perspective on bullying in organizations. The lack of attention to the concept of workplace dignity in American organizational structures has supported and even encouraged both casual and more severe forms of harassment that our workplace laws do not currently cover. The demoralization victims suffer can create toxic (...)
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  6. Gina Vega (2003). The American Dream—Then and Now. Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (1):99-106.
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  7. Gina Vega & Mary Ann McHugh (2003). “What Button Do I Press?” The Consequences of Conducting a Service Learning Project with Senior Citizens. Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (1):91-117.
    In an effort to build interest in the two-year old service learning center and to fulfill its mission to integrate academic life with service in thoughtful and relevant ways, a competition was held to award developmental grants to faculty to create innovative courses incorporating service learning. The winning proposal from the business school used a business ethics course as the vehicle for formally introducing service into the business curriculum. This paper will tell the story of the intended and unintended consequences (...)
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  8. Patrick Primeaux & Gina Vega (2002). Operationalizing Maslow: Religion and Flow as Business Partners. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 38 (1-2):97 - 108.
    Maslow and Csikszentmihalyi interpret human experience through a broad application of stakeholder theory to provide an expanded framework for ethical business. The aggressive search for mutuality of interest can reconcile conflicting stakeholder needs. Maslow's religious peak experiences work in tandem with Csikszentmihalyi's psychological optimal experiences (flow) to support the proposition that transcendence is an achievable goal, both for individuals and for corporations.
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  9. Gina Vega (2002). Wet Sneakers, Bottom Lines, and Other Obstacles to Spirituality. Teaching Business Ethics 6 (1):5-14.
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  10. Gina Vega (1997). Caveat Emptor: Ethical Chauvinism in the Global Economy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (12-13):1353-1362.
    The tendency of American business schools to teach a "universal" set of ethical standards and managerial perspectives can have a serious impact on the business practices of new graduates as well as on the success of companies desiring to do business globally. We need to become more sensitive to other cultural/ethical approaches and to sensitize our business students to them early in their academic process in order to encourage the use of common-norming to attain mutual economic benefit. We can understand (...)
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