19 found
Sort by:
  1. Giorgio Pini (2013). What Lucifer Wanted: Anselm, Aquinas, and Scotus on the Object of the First Evil Choice. Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 1:61-82.
  2. Giorgio Pini (2012). Logic, Theology, and Poetry in Boethius, Abelard, and Alain of Lille: Words in the Absence of Things. By Eileen C. Sweeney. International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):252-254.
  3. Giorgio Pini (2012). Scotus on Hell. Modern Schoolman 89 (3-4):223-241.
    The existence of everlasting punishment has sometimes been thought to be incompatible with God’s goodness and omnipotence. John Duns Scotus focused on the key issue concerning everlasting punishment, i.e., the impossibility for the damned to repent of their evil deeds and so to obtain forgiveness. Scotus’s claimwas that such an impossibility is not logical but nomological, i.e., it depends on the rules God established to govern the world, specifically on what I call ‘the rule of the permanence of the last (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Giorgio Pini (2011). Can God Create My Thoughts? Scotus's Case Against the Causal Account of Intentionality. Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (1):39-63.
    Between the thirteenth and fourteenth century, a remarkable number of thinkers developed an interest in explaining a cognitive state's property of being about something, as many recent studies have shown.1 Several of those later medieval accounts shared a common strategy. According to this common strategy, intentionality was explained in causal terms. Thus, it was contended that cognitive states are about what causes them, and that it is precisely because a certain thing causes a certain cognitive state that such a cognitive (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Giorgio Pini (2011). The Development of Aquinas's Thought. In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Giorgio Pini (2010). Lectura Romana in Primum Sententiarum Petri Lombardi. International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4):518-519.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Giorgio Pini (2010). Review of Henrik Lagerlund (Ed.), Rethinking the History of Skepticism: The Missing Medieval Background. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (8).
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Giorgio Pini (2009). Scotus on Knowing and Naming Natural Kinds. History of Philosophy Quarterly 26 (3):255 - 272.
  9. Giorgio Pini (2009). Scotus on the Possibility of a Better World. Acta Philosophica 18 (2).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Giorgio Pini (2008). Scotus on the Objects of Cognitive Acts. Franciscan Studies 66 (1):281-315.
  11. Giorgio Pini (2007). Duns Scotus on God (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (3):497-498.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Giorgio Pini (2005). Ex Defectu Intellectualis Luminis: Giles of Rome on the Role and Limits of Metaphysics. Quaestio 5 (1):527-541.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Giorgio Pini (2005). Scotus's Realist Conception of the Categories: His Legacy to Late Medieval Debates. Vivarium 43 (1):63-110.
    Scotus claims that the extramental world is divided into ten distinct kinds of essences, no one of which can be reduced to another one. Although by the end of the thirteenth century this claim was not new, Scotus's way of articulating it into a comprehensive metaphysical doctrine resulted into a ground-breaking contribution to what became known as 'late medieval realism'. This paper shows how Scotus's view of the categories as ten kinds of irreducible essences should be seen as a development (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Giorgio Pini (2005). Univocity in Scotus's Quaestiones Super Metaphysicam: The Solution to a Riddle. Medioevo 30:69-110.
  15. Giorgio Pini (2002). Categories and Logic in Duns Scotus: An Interpretation of Aristotle's Categories in the Late Thirteenth Century. Brill.
    This study of the interpretations of Aristotle's "Categories" in the thirteenth century provides an introduction to some main themes of medieval philosophical ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Giorgio Pini (2001). Richard Cross Duns Scotus. Great Medieval Thinkers. (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999), Pp. XXI+250. £35.00 (Hbk). ISBN 0 19 512552 5. £15.99 (Pbk). ISBN 0 19 512553. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 37 (2):223-246.
  17. Giorgio Pini (2001). Signification of Names in Duns Scotus and Some of His Contemporaries. Vivarium 39 (1):20-51.
  18. Giorgio Pini (1999). Species, Concept, and Thing: Theories of Signification in the Second Half of the Thirteenth Century. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 8 (1):21-52.
    Students of later medieval semantics are familiar with the controversy that developed at the end of the thirteenth century over the signification of names. The debate focused on the signification of common nouns such as and : Do they signify an extramental thing or a mental representation of an extramental thing? 1 Duns Scotus is commonly recognized as having played an important role in this debate. 2 In his Ordinatio, he alludes to a magnaaltercatio among his contemporaries concerning signification. 3 (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Giorgio Pini (1992). La dottrina della creazione e la ricezione delle opere di Tommaso d'Aquino nelle Quaestiones de esse et essentia (qq. 1-7) di Egidio Romano.‖. [REVIEW] Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 3:271-304.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation