Search results for 'Giselle Walker' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Giselle Walker & E. S. Leedham-Green (eds.) (2010). Identity. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Identity of meaning Adrian Poole; 2. Identity and the law Lionel Bently; 3. Species-identity Peter Crane; 4. Mathematical identity Marcus Du Sautoy; 5. Immunological identity Philippa Marrack; 6. Visualizing identity Ludmilla Jordanova; 7. Musical identity Christopher Hogwood; 8. Identity and the mind Raymond Tallis; Notes on the contributors; Index.
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  2. Lenore Ea Walker (2000). Jose M. Prieto, Michel Sabourin, Lenore Ea Walker, Juan I. Aragones, and Maria Amerigo. In Kurt Pawlik & Mark R. Rosenzweig (eds.), International Handbook of Psychology. Sage Publications Ltd.score: 180.0
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  3. Mark Walker (2006). Mark Walker. Minerva 44 (3):241-250.score: 180.0
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  4. Margaret Urban Walker (2007). Moral Understandings: A Feminist Study in Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This is a revised edition of Walker's well-known book in feminist ethics first published in 1997. Walker's book proposes a view of morality and an approach to ethical theory which uses the critical insights of feminism and race theory to rethink the epistemological and moral position of the ethical theorist, and how moral theory is inescapably shaped by culture and history. The main gist of her book is that morality is embodied in "practices of responsibility" that express our (...)
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  5. Paul Ernest Walker (1993). Early Philosophical Shiism: The Ismaili Neoplatonism of Abū Yaʻqūb Al-Sijistānī. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    The Ismailis, among whom are the followers of the Aga Khan, rose to prominence during the 4th Islamic/10th Christian century. They developed a remarkably successful intellectual programme to sustain and support their political activities, promoting demands of Islamic doctrine together with the then newly imported sciences from abroad. The high watermark of this intellectual movement is best illustrated in the writings of the Ismaili theoretician Abu Ya´qub al-Sijistani. Using both published and manuscript writings of al-Sijistani that have hitherto been largely (...)
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  6. Michelle Boulous Walker (1998). Philosophy and the Maternal Body: Reading Silence. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Philosophy and the Maternal Body is a fascinating exploration of an overlooked aspect of feminist thought: what is the role of maternity in philosophy and in what ways has it been used by male theorists to effectively "silence" the voices of women in philosophy? Drawing on rich examples such as Plato's allegory of the cave, Sigmund Freud and Melanie Klein's writing on the mother and the mother-daughter relationship, and the psychoanalytic and feminist insights of Irigaray and Kristeva, Michelle Boulous (...) clearly shows how terms such as denial, repression and foreclosure offer crucial insight into the philosophical construction of the maternal body. (shrink)
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  7. Mark A. Schroll & Heather Walker (2011). Diagnosing the Human Superiority Complex: Providing Evidence the Eco-Crisis is Born of Conscious Agency. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):39-48.score: 60.0
    This article is an amendment to Drengson (2011) that offers examples from fieldwork and reporting of practices influenced by the technocratic paradigm. Specifically (1) Krippner's work with Brazilian shamans and the theft of their tribal knowledge by the biotechnology industry that Krippner refers to as ecopiratism. (2) Hitchcock's field research with indigenous populations in the northwestern Kalahari Desert region of southern Africa and his documented assault of these indigenous peoples by private companies that Hitchcock refers to as developmental genocide. And (...)
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  8. William Walker (1994). Locke, Literary Criticism, and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    William Walker's original analysis of John Locke's An Essay Concerning Human Understanding offers a challenging and provocative assessment of Locke's importance as a thinker, bridging the gap between philosophical and literary-critical discussion of his work. He presents Locke as a foundational figure who defines the epistemological and ontological ground on which eighteenth-century and Romantic literature operate and eventually diverge. He is revealed as a crucial figure for emerging modernity, less the familiar empiricist innovator and more the proto-Nietzschean thinker whose (...)
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  9. Margaret Urban Walker (1993). Thinking Morality Interpersonally: A Reply to Burgess-Jackson. Hypatia 8 (3):167 - 173.score: 60.0
    In a comment on my paper "Feminism, Ethics, and the Question of Theory" (Walker 1992), Keith Burgess-Jackson argues that I have misdiagnosed the problem with modern moral theory. Burgess-Jackson misunderstands both the illustrative-"theoretical-juridical"-model I constructed there and how my critique and alternative model answer to specifically feminist concerns. Ironically, his own view seems to reproduce the very conception of morality as an individually internalized action-guiding code of principles that my earlier essay argued is the conception central to modern (...)
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  10. Mark A. Walker & M. Milan (2006). Astrophysical Fine Tuning, Naturalism, and the Contemporary Design Argument. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (3):285 – 307.score: 30.0
    Evidence for instances of astrophysical 'fine tuning' (or 'coincidences') is thought by some to lend support to the design argument (i.e. the argument that our universe has been designed by some deity). We assess some of the relevant empirical and conceptual issues. We argue that astrophysical fine tuning calls for some explanation, but this explanation need not appeal to the design argument. A clear and strict separation of the issue of anthropic fine tuning on one hand and any form of (...)
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  11. Rebecca L. Walker & P. J. Ivanhoe (eds.) (2007). Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    In Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems, leading figures in the fields of virtue ethics and ethics come together to present the first ...
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  12. Margaret Urban Walker (1991). Moral Luck and the Virtues of Impure Agency. Metaphilosophy 22 (1-2):14-27.score: 30.0
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  13. Melanie Walker (2010). Critical Capability Pedagogies and University Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (8):898-917.score: 30.0
    The article argues for an alliance of the capability approach developed by Amartya Sen with ideas from critical pedagogy for undergraduate university education which develops student agency and well being on the one hand, and social change towards greater justice on the other. The purposes of a university education in this article are taken to include both intrinsic and instrumental purposes and to therefore include personal development, economic opportunities and becoming educated citizens. Core ideas from the capability approach are outlined, (...)
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  14. Arthur F. Walker (1989). The Problem of Weakness of Will. Noûs 23 (5):653-676.score: 30.0
    Philosophical discussions of akrasia over the last fifteen years have focused on certain skeptical arguments which purport to question the possibility of a kind of akratic action which, following Pears, I call 'last ditch akrasia' (Pears [38]). An agent, succumbing to last ditch akrasia, freely, knowingly, and intentionally performs an action A against his better judgment that an incompatible action B is the better thing to do. (See Audi [1] for a detailed analysis.) Last ditch akrasia is not the only (...)
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  15. A. D. M. Walker (1988). Political Obligation and the Argument From Gratitude. Philosophy and Public Affairs 17 (3):191-211.score: 30.0
  16. Margaret Urban Walker (2006). Restorative Justice and Reparations. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):377–395.score: 30.0
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  17. Tom Walker (2010). Who Do We Treat First When Resources Are Scarce? Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):200-211.score: 30.0
    In a health service with limited resources we must make decisions about who to treat first. In this paper I develop a version of the restoration argument according to which those whose need for resources is a consequence of their voluntary choices should receive lower priority when it comes to health care. I then consider three possible problems for this argument based on those that have been raised against other theories of this type: that we don't know in a particular (...)
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  18. Margaret Urban Walker (2010). Truth Telling as Reparations. Metaphilosophy 41 (4):525-545.score: 30.0
    Abstract: International instruments now defend a "right to the truth" for victims of political repression and violence and include truth telling about human rights violations as a kind of reparation as well as a form of redress. While truth telling about violations is obviously a condition of redress or repair for violations, it may not be clear how truth telling itself is a kind of reparations. By showing that concerted truth telling can satisfy four features of suitable reparations vehicles, I (...)
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  19. Mary Jean Walker (2010). Addiction and Self-Deception: A Method for Self-Control? Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (3):305-319.score: 30.0
    Neil Levy argues that while addicts who believe they are not addicts are self-deceived, addicts who believe they are addicts are just as self-deceived. Such persons accept a false belief that their addictive behaviour involves a loss of control. This paper examines two implications of Levy's discussion: that accurate self-knowledge may be particularly difficult for addicts; and that an addict's self-deceived belief that they cannot control themselves may aid their attempts at self-control. I argue that the self-deceived beliefs of addicts (...)
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  20. A. D. M. Walker (1979). Aristotle's Account of Friendship in the "Nicomachean Ethics". Phronesis 24 (2):180 - 196.score: 30.0
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  21. Mark Walker & Milan Cirkovic, Anthropic Reasoning and the Contemporary Design Argument in Astrophysics: A Reply to Robert Klee.score: 30.0
    In a recent study of astrophysical “fine-tunings” (or “coincidences”), Robert Klee critically assesses the support that such astrophysical evidence might be thought to lend to the design argument (i.e., the argument that our universe has been designed by some deity). Klee argues that a proper assessment indicates that the universe is not as “fine-tuned” as advertised by proponents of the design arguments. We argue (i) that Klee’s assessment of the data is, to a certain extent, problematic; and (ii) even if (...)
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  22. Ralph C. S. Walker (2011). Kant on the Number of Worlds. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (5):821-843.score: 30.0
    It has long been disputed whether Kant's transcendental idealism requires two worlds ? one of appearances and one of things in themselves ? or only one. The one-world view must be wrong if it claims that individual spatio-temporal things can be identified with particular things in themselves, and if it fails to take seriously the doctrine of double affection; versions that insist on one world, without making claims about the identity of individual things, cannot say in what way the world (...)
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  23. Mark Walker (2009). The Anthropic Argument Against the Existence of God. Sophia 48 (4):351 - 378.score: 30.0
    If God is morally perfect then He must perform the morally best actions, but creating humans is not the morally best action. If this line of reasoning can be maintained then the mere fact that humans exist contradicts the claim that God exists. This is the ‘anthropic argument’. The anthropic argument, is related to, but distinct from, the traditional argument from evil. The anthropic argument forces us to consider the ‘creation question’: why did God not create other gods rather than (...)
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  24. Corey D. B. Walker (2004). Modernity in Black: Du Bois and the (Re)Construction of Black Identity in the Souls of Black Folk. Philosophia Africana 7 (1):83-93.score: 30.0
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  25. R. W. Thatcher, J. F. Gomez-Molina, C. Biver, D. North, R. Curtin & R. W. Walker (2000). Two Compartmental Models of EEG Coherence and MRI Biophysics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):412-412.score: 30.0
    Studies have shown that as MRI T2 relaxation time lengthens there is a shift toward more unbound or “free-water” and less partitioning of the protein/lipid molecules per unit volume. A shift toward less water partitioning or lengthened MRI T2 relaxation time is linearly related to reduced high frequency EEG amplitude, reduced short distance EEG coherence, increased long distance EEG coherence, and reduced cognitive functioning (Thatcher et al. 1998a; 1998b).
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  26. Rebecca L. Walker (2006). Human and Animal Subjects of Research: The Moral Significance of Respect Versus Welfare. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (4):305-331.score: 30.0
    Human beings with diminished decision-making capacities are usually thought to require greater protections from the potential harms of research than fully autonomous persons. Animal subjects of research receive lesser protections than any human beings regardless of decision-making capacity. Paradoxically, however, it is precisely animals’ lack of some characteristic human capacities that is commonly invoked to justify using them for human purposes. In other words, for humans lesser capacities correspond to greater protections but for animals the opposite is true. Without explicit (...)
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  27. D. P. Walker (1958). The Astral Body in Renaissance Medicine. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 21 (1/2):119-133.score: 30.0
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  28. M. Arkoun & R. S. Walker (1987). The Unity of Man in Islamic Thought. Diogenes 35 (140):50-69.score: 30.0
  29. Ralph C. S. Walker (1985). Spinoza and the Coherence Theory of Truth. Mind 94 (373):1-18.score: 30.0
  30. D. P. Walker (1953). Orpheus the Theologian and Renaissance Platonists. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 16 (1/2):100-120.score: 30.0
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  31. A. D. M. Walker (1989). Obligations of Gratitude and Political Obligation. Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (4):359-364.score: 30.0
  32. Ralph C. S. Walker (1995). Verificationism, Anti-Realism and Idealism. European Journal of Philosophy 3 (3):257-272.score: 30.0
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  33. R. C. S. Walker (2007). Review: Accessing Kant: A Relaxed Introduction to the Critique of Pure Reason. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (461):212-215.score: 30.0
  34. Tom Walker (2013). Respecting Autonomy Without Disclosing Information. Bioethics 27 (7):388-394.score: 30.0
    There is widespread agreement that it would be both morally and legally wrong to treat a competent patient, or to carry out research with a competent participant, without the voluntary consent of that patient or research participant. Furthermore, in medical ethics it is generally taken that that consent must be informed. The most widely given reason for this has been that informed consent is needed to respect the patient's or research participant's autonomy. In this article I set out to challenge (...)
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  35. Ralph Walker (2002). Review: Kantian Humility: Our Ignorance of Things in Themselves. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (441):136-143.score: 30.0
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  36. Mark Thomas Walker (1996). The Voluntariness of Judgment. Inquiry 39 (1):97 – 119.score: 30.0
    While various items closely associated with belief, such as speech?acts of assertion, or what have recently been termed acts of ?acceptance?, can clearly be voluntary, it is commonly supposed that belief itself, being intrinsically truth?directed, is essentially passive. I argue that while this may be true of belief proper, understood as a kind of disposition, it is not true of acts of assent or ?judgment?. Judgments, I contend, must be deemed voluntary precisely because of their truth?aimedness, for in their case (...)
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  37. Valerie Tiberius & John D. Walker (1998). Arrogance. American Philosophical Quarterly 35 (4):379 - 390.score: 30.0
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  38. Tom Walker (2011). Informed Consent and the Requirement to Ensure Understanding. Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (1):50-62.score: 30.0
    It is generally held that doctors and researchers have an obligation to obtain informed consent. Over time there has been a move in relation to this obligation from a requirement to disclose information to a requirement to ensure that that information is understood. Whilst this change has been resisted, in this article I argue that both sides on this matter are mistaken. When investigating what information is needed for consent to be informed we might be trying to determine what information (...)
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  39. Margaret Urban Walker (1991). Partial Consideration. Ethics 101 (4):758-774.score: 30.0
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  40. Matthew Walker (2010). The Virtue of Aristotle's Ethics (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (3):397-398.score: 30.0
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  41. Margaret Urban Walker (2008). Review of Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership:Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership by Martha C. Nussbaum. [REVIEW] Ethics 118 (4):742-746.score: 30.0
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  42. A. D. M. Walker (1974). Negative Utilitarianism. Mind 83 (331):424-428.score: 30.0
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  43. Arthur F. Walker (1985). An Occurrent Theory of Practical and Theoretical Reasoning. Philosophical Studies 48 (2):199 - 210.score: 30.0
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  44. Tom Walker (2008). Giving Addicts Their Drug of Choice: The Problem of Consent. Bioethics 22 (6):314–320.score: 30.0
    Researchers working on drug addiction may, for a variety of reasons, want to carry out research which involves giving addicts their drug of choice. In carrying out this research consent needs to be obtained from those addicts recruited to participate in it. Concerns have been raised about whether or not such addicts are able to give this consent. Despite their differences, however, both sides in this debate appear to be agreed that the way to resolve this issue is to determine (...)
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  45. R. Ruyer & R. S. Walker (1988). There Is No Subconscious: Embryogenesis and Memory. Diogenes 36 (142):24-46.score: 30.0
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  46. Mary Walker & Cynthia Townley (2012). Contract Cheating: A New Challenge for Academic Honesty? [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (1):27-44.score: 30.0
    ‘Contract cheating’ has recently emerged as a form of academic dishonesty. It involves students contracting out their coursework to writers in order to submit the purchased assignments as their own work, usually via the internet. This form of cheating involves epistemic and ethical problems that are continuous with older forms of cheating, but which it also casts in a new form. It is a concern to educators because it is very difficult to detect, because it is arguably more fraudulent than (...)
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  47. Paul Guyer & Ralph Walker (1990). Kant's Conception of Empirical Law. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 64:221 - 258.score: 30.0
  48. Matthew P. Walker (2005). A Refined Model of Sleep and the Time Course of Memory Formation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):51-64.score: 30.0
    Research in the neurosciences continues to provide evidence that sleep plays a role in the processes of learning and memory. There is less of a consensus, however, regarding the precise stages of memory development during which sleep is considered a requirement, simply favorable, or not important. This article begins with an overview of recent studies regarding sleep and learning, predominantly in the procedural memory domain, and is measured against our current understanding of the mechanisms that govern memory formation. Based on (...)
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  49. Margaret Urban Walker (2005). Diotima's Ghost: The Uncertain Place of Feminist Philosophy in Professional Philosophy. Hypatia 20 (3):153-165.score: 30.0
  50. D. P. Walker (1967). Kepler's Celestial Music. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 30:228-250.score: 30.0
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