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  1. Glenn Alexander Magee (2013). Esotericism and the Academy: Rejected Knowledge in Western Culture by Wouter J. Hanegraaff (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):496-497.
    “Esotericism” refers, more or less, to what used to be called “the occult.” It comprises such matters as astrology, alchemy, kabbalism, magic, and theosophy—to name just a few. In other words, it refers to just about everything that came to be marginalized in the modern period as “superstition” and “pseudo-science,” and anathematized by scientists and philosophers. In recent decades, there has been an explosion of scholarly interest in esotericism, partly because of research revealing that many “canonical” scientists and philosophers of (...)
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  2. Barry Allen, Bernard Faure, Jacob Raz, Glenn Alexander Magee, N. Verbin, Dalia Ofer, Elaine Pryce & Amy M. King (2010). Introduction: Vanishing Into Things. Common Knowledge 16 (3):417-423.
    Introducing the sixth and final installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” Allen looks at the symposium retrospectively and concludes that it has mainly concerned “sage knowledge,” defined as foresight into the development of situations. The sagacious knower sees the disposition of things in an early, incipient form and knows how to intervene with nearly effortless and undetectable (quiet) effectiveness. Whatever the circumstance, the sage handles it with finesse, never doing too much but also never leaving anything undone (...)
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  3. Glenn Alexander Magee (2010). Quietism in German Mysticism and Philosophy. Common Knowledge 16 (3):457-473.
    A contribution to the sixth installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” this article argues that a strong strain of quietism runs through German intellectual history, from medieval mystics such as Eckhart to the main line of modern philosophers, including Kant, Fichte, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, and Heidegger. Magee treats each of these in turn, establishing case by case that the relation of the individual to the universal is the central issue of German thought, as it is of (...)
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  4. Glenn Alexander Magee (2009). Architectonic, Truth, and Rhetoric. Philosophy and Rhetoric 42 (1):pp. 59-71.
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  5. Glenn Alexander Magee (2009). Phenomenology and Mysticism. International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (2).
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  6. Glenn Alexander Magee (2009). Phenomenology and Mysticism: The Verticality of Religious Experience-Anthony J. Steinbock. International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (2):268.
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  7. Glenn Alexander Magee (2001). Hegel and the Hermetic Tradition. Cornell University Press.
    Glenn Alexander Magee's controversial book argues that Hegel was decisively influenced by the Hermetic tradition, a body of thought with roots in Greco-Roman ...
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