Search results for 'Glenn Austin' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Glenn Austin (1953). The Philosophy in Philosophy of Education. Educational Theory 3 (1):68-71.
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  2. Glenn Austin, W. Hayward & S. Rouhe (1974). A Note on the Problem of Conscious Man and Cerebral Disconnection by Hemispherectomy. In Marcel Kinsbourne & W. Smith (eds.), Hemispheric Disconnection and Cerebral Function. Charles C
     
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  3. J. L. Austin (1961). A Plea for Excuses' in Austin. In J. O. Urmson & G. J. Warnock (eds.), Philosophical Papers. Clarendon Press
     
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  4.  7
    John H. M. Austin (2003). Holcombe McCulloch Austin, 1909-2003. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 76 (5):158 -.
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  5. William H. Austin (1973). Religious Commitment and the Logical Status of Doctrines: WILLIAM H. AUSTIN. Religious Studies 9 (1):39-48.
    The great Falsification Debate about the logical status of religious beliefs seems fairly quiescent at present. Most philosophers of religion have opted for one or the other of two opposite responses to the falsificationists' challenge.
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  6. John Austin (1906/1983). The Austinian Theory of Law: Being an Edition of Lectures I, V, and Vi of Austin's "Jurisprudence," and of Austin's "Essay on the Uses of the Study of Jurisprudence" with Critical Notes and Excursus. F.B. Rothman.
     
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  7. J. L. Austin (1975). How to Do Things with Words. Clarendon Press.
    For this second edition, the editors have returned to Austin's original lecture notes, amending the printed text where it seemed necessary.
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  8. J. L. Austin (1979). Philosophical Papers. Oxford University Press.
    The influence of J. L. Austin on contemporary philosophy was substantial during his lifetime, and has grown greatly since his death, at the height of his powers, in 1960. Philosophical Papers, first published in 1961, was the first of three volumes of Austin's work to be edited by J. O. Urmson and G. J. Warnock. Together with Sense and Sensibilia and How to do things with Words, it has extended Austin's influence far beyond the circle who (...)
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  9. J. L. Austin (1962). Sense and Sensibilia. Oxford University Press.
    This book is the one to put into the hands of those who have been over-impressed by Austin 's critics....[Warnock's] brilliant editing puts everybody who is concerned with philosophical problems in his debt.
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  10. John Austin (1954/1998). The Province of Jurisprudence Determined. Hackett Pub..
    The Province of Jurisprudence Determined (1832) is a classic of nineteenth-century English jurisprudence, a subject on which Austin had a profound impact. His book is primarily concerned with a meticulous explanation of most of the core concepts of his legal philosophy, including his conception of law, his separation of law and morality, and his theory of sovereignty. Almost a quarter of it consists of an interpretation and defence of the principle of utility. This edition includes the complete and (...)
     
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  11. James H. Austin (2006). Zen-Brain Reflections. The MIT Press.
    This sequel to the widely read Zen and the Brain continues James Austin's explorations into the key interrelationships between Zen Buddhism and brain research. In Zen-Brain Reflections, Austin, a clinical neurologist, researcher, and Zen practitioner, examines the evolving psychological processes and brain changes associated with the path of long-range meditative training. Austin draws not only on the latest neuroscience research and new neuroimaging studies but also on Zen literature and his personal experience with alternate states of consciousness.Zen-Brain (...)
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  12.  30
    Linda MacDonald Glenn & Jeanann S. Boyce (2008). Nanotechnology: Considering the Complex Ethical, Legal, and Societal Issues with the Parameters of Human Performance. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 2 (3):265-275.
    Nanotechnology: Considering the Complex Ethical, Legal, and Societal Issues with the Parameters of Human Performance Content Type Journal Article Pages 265-275 DOI 10.1007/s11569-008-0047-6 Authors Linda MacDonald Glenn, Albany Medical College/Center Alden March Bioethics Institute Albany NY 12208 USA Jeanann S. Boyce, Montgomery College Dept. of Computer Science and Business 7600 Takoma Avenue Takoma Park MD 20912 USA Journal NanoEthics Online ISSN 1871-4765 Print ISSN 1871-4757 Journal Volume Volume 2 Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 3.
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  13. John Austin (1954). The Province of Jurisprudence Determined and the Uses of the Study of Jurisprudence. London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson.
    This edition comprises the full text of Austin's The Province of Jurisprudence Determined, a classic work of moral, political, and legal philosophy, and Austin ...
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  14.  18
    C. R. Austin (1978). Bisexuality and the Problem of its Social Acceptance. Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (3):132-137.
    Professor Austin explores four main areas in this paper. First of all he outlines the physical development of sex differentiation in the embryo. He develops this by describing the clinical manifestations of abnormality which can appear at that stage. Professor Austin points out that there are relatively few people with abnormalities and that those who do show homosexual tendencies are not noticeably different from the norm in terms of their sexual equipment and hormone levels. It is (...)
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  15. Norman Austin (1990). Meaning and Being in Myth. Penn State University Press.
    Norman Austin has organized his analysis of classical Greek myths around Lacan's dichotomy between Being and the meanings imposed upon Being by culturally determined signifiers. The primary signifiers in myth, as projections of contradictory meanings, impel human consciousness in contradictory directions: toward heroic self-realization, on the one hand, and into the fear, guilt, and despair resulting from failure, on the other. The gods both reveal and occlude that which they signify—the signified; ultimately, Being itself. Austin includes (...)
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  16. Norman Austin (2008). Meaning and Being in Myth. Penn State University Press.
    Norman Austin has organized his analysis of classical Greek myths around Lacan's dichotomy between Being and the meanings imposed upon Being by culturally determined signifiers. The primary signifiers in myth, as projections of contradictory meanings, impel human consciousness in contradictory directions: toward heroic self-realization, on the one hand, and into the fear, guilt, and despair resulting from failure, on the other. The gods both reveal and occlude that which they signify—the signified; ultimately, Being itself. Austin includes (...)
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  17. James H. Austin (2013). Meditating Selflessly: Practical Neural Zen. The MIT Press.
    This is not the usual kind of self-help book. Indeed, its major premise heeds a Zen master's advice to be _less_ self-centered. Yes, it is "one more book of words about Zen," as the author concedes, yet this book explains meditative practices from the perspective of a " _neural_ Zen." The latest findings in brain research inform its suggestions. In _Meditating Selflessly_, James Austin -- Zen practitioner, neurologist, and author of three acclaimed books on Zen and neuroscience -- (...)
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  18. James H. Austin (2010). Zen-Brain Reflections. The MIT Press.
    This sequel to the widely read Zen and the Brain continues James Austin's explorations into the key interrelationships between Zen Buddhism and brain research. In Zen-Brain Reflections, Austin, a clinical neurologist, researcher, and Zen practitioner, examines the evolving psychological processes and brain changes associated with the path of long-range meditative training. Austin draws not only on the latest neuroscience research and new neuroimaging studies but also on Zen literature and his personal experience with alternate (...)
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  19.  43
    David L. Hull, Rodney E. Langman & Sigrid S. Glenn (2001). A General Account of Selection: Biology, Immunology, and Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):511-528.
    Authors frequently refer to gene-based selection in biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, and operant learning as exemplifying selection processes in the same sense of this term. However, as obvious as this claim may seem on the surface, setting out an account of “selection” that is general enough to incorporate all three of these processes without becoming so general as to be vacuous is far from easy. In this target article, we set out such a general (...)
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  20.  98
    James H. Austin (1998). Zen and the Brain: Toward an Understanding of Meditation and Consciousness. MIT Press.
    The book uses Zen Buddhism as the opening wedge for an extraordinarily wide-ranging exploration of consciousness.
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  21.  15
    James R. Glenn (1992). Can a Business and Society Course Affect the Ethical Judgment of Future Managers? Journal of Business Ethics 11 (3):217 - 223.
    This paper reports the results of a four year study to measure the effect of a Business and Society course on the ethical judgment of students. The research involves a matched pre/post survey with control design, with the Business and Society course functioning as the treatment variable. The subjects were undergraduate and graduate (M.B.A.) business students (n=460). The answer to the question posed by the title of this paper is yes, in a more ethical direction.
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  22. John Austin (1956). A Plea for Excuses. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 57:1--30.
    The subject of this paper, Excuses, is one not to be treated, but only to be introduced, within such limits. It is, or might be, the name of a whole branch, even a ramiculated branch, of philosophy, or at least of one fashion of philosophy. I shall try, therefore, first to state what the subject is, why it is worth studying, and how it may be studied, all this at a regrettably lofty level: and then I shall illustrate, in more (...)
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  23.  9
    James R. Glenn & M. Frances Loo (1993). Business Students' and Practitioners' Ethical Decisions Over Time. Journal of Business Ethics 12 (11):835 - 847.
    This paper compares the ethical decisions and attitudes of business students and practitioners. Recent unpublished data from a national study of over 1600 students are contrasted with information reported previously. Students are found consistently to make less ethical choices than practitioners, and there is some indication that students are making less ethical choices in the 1980s than in the 1960s. In addition, both students and practitioners agree that buyers should beware, view the role of business more narrowly, and find fewer (...)
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  24. J. L. Austin (1966). Three Ways of Spilling Ink. Philosophical Review 75 (4):427-440.
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  25. Michael Austin (2007). The Influence of Anxiety and Literature's Panglossian Nose. Philosophy and Literature 31 (2):215-232.
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  26.  31
    Wendy Austin, Gillian Lemermeyer, Lisa Goldberg, Vangie Bergum & Melissa S. Johnson (2005). Moral Distress in Healthcare Practice: The Situation of Nurses. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 17 (1):33-48.
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  27. J. Austin (1946). Other Minds. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 20:148-87.
     
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  28.  23
    David L. Hull, Rodney E. Langman & Sigrid S. Glenn (2001). At Last: Serious Consideration. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):559-569.
    For a long time, several natural phenomena have been considered unproblematically selection processes in the same sense of “selection.” In our target article we dealt with three of these phenomena: gene-based selection in biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, and operant learning. We characterize selection in terms of three processes (variation, replication, and environmental interaction) resulting in the evolution of lineages via differential replication. Our commentators were largely supportive with respect to variation and environmental interaction but (...)
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  29. James W. Austin (1978). Russell's Cryptic Response to Strawson. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (4):531-537.
  30.  22
    Wendy Austin, Marlene Rankel, Leon Kagan, Vangie Bergum & Gillian Lemermeyer (2005). To Stay or to Go, to Speak or Stay Silent, to Act or Not to Act: Moral Distress as Experienced by Psychologists. Ethics and Behavior 15 (3):197 – 212.
    The moral distress of psychologists working in psychiatric and mental health care settings was explored in an interdisciplinary, hermeneutic phenomenological study situated at the University of Alberta, Canada. Moral distress is the state experienced when moral choices and actions are thwarted by constraints. Psychologists described specific incidents in which they felt their integrity had been compromised by such factors as institutional and interinstitutional demands, team conflicts, and interdisciplinary disputes. They described dealing with the resulting moral distress by such means as (...)
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  31. J. L. Austin (1946). Other minds, part II. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 148:148-187.
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  32. James W. Austin (1980). Wittgenstein's Solutions to the Color Exclusion Problem. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 41 (September-December):142-149.
  33.  32
    Michael Austin (1985). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 25 (1):283-285.
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  34. Michael W. Austin, Divine Command Theory. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  35.  59
    L. Austin (2003). Privacy and the Question of Technology. Law and Philosophy 22 (2):119-166.
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  36.  96
    James H. Austin (2000). Consciousness Evolves When the Self Dissolves. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):209-230.
    We need to clarify at least four aspects of selfhood if we are to reach a better understanding of consciousness in general, and of its alternate states. First, how did we develop our self-centred psychophysiology? Second, can the four familiar lobes of the brain alone serve, if only as preliminary landmarks of convenience, to help understand the functions of our many self-referent networks? Third, what could cause one's former sense of self to vanish from the mental field during an extraordinary (...)
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  37.  31
    Linda MacDonald Glenn (2003). A Legal Perspective on Humanity, Personhood, and Species Boundaries. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):27 – 28.
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  38.  61
    Michael Austin (1995). Art and Religion as Metaphor. British Journal of Aesthetics 35 (2):145-153.
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  39.  56
    Michael W. Austin (2004). The Failure of Biological Accounts of Parenthood. Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (4):499-510.
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  40.  55
    Wendy Austin, Vangie Bergum, Simon Nuttgens & Cindy Peternelj-Taylor (2006). A Re-Visioning of Boundaries in Professional Helping Relationships: Exploring Other Metaphors. Ethics and Behavior 16 (2):77 – 94.
    There are many ethical issues arising for practitioners in what are termed the boundaries of professional helping relationships. In this article, the authors argue that the boundary metaphor is not sufficient for conceptualizing these ethical issues and propose that alternative metaphors be considered. The use of a different metaphor might allow practitioners to re-vision the relationship issues in a more realistic, richer, and holistic way. Those explored here include highway, bridge, and territory. For the authors, it is territory that seems (...)
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  41.  8
    James W. Austin (1975). Rorty's Materialism. Auslegung 3 (November):20-28.
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  42. J. L. Austin (1964). Sense And Sensibilia; Reconstructed From The Manuscript Notes By G J Warnock. Oxford University Press.
  43.  28
    Michael W. Austin (2007). Fundamental Interests and Parental Rights. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (2):221-235.
    I argue for a moderate view of the justification and the extent of the moral rights of parents that avoids the extremes of both children’s liberationism and parental absolutism. I claim that parents have rights qua parents, and that these prima facie rights are grounded in certain fundamental interests that both parents and children possess, namely, psychological well-being, intimate relationships, and the freedom to pursue that which brings satisfaction and meaning to life. I also examine several issues related to (...)
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  44.  25
    William H. Austin (1972). Paradigms, Rationality, and Partial Communication. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 3 (2):203-218.
    Summary Critics have said that Kuhn's account of scientific revolutions represents them as subjective and irrational processes, in which mystical conversions and community pressures rather than good reasons determine choices between theories. Kuhn rejects the charge, insisting that there is partial communication among proponents of competing paradigm candidates and their arguments are rational though not coercive. The critics reply that in fact Kuhn's position entails total non-communication and irrationality. A Kuhnian account of partial communication is thus necessary. Kuhn's attempt to (...)
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  45.  10
    A. K. Austin (1969). On the Unexpected Examination. Mind 78 (309):137.
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  46.  31
    David F. Austin (1981). Plantinga on Actualism and Essences. Philosophical Studies 39 (1):35 - 42.
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  47.  18
    Richard Cartwright Austin (1985). Beauty: A Foundation for Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 7 (3):197-208.
    Human awareness of natural beauty stimulates the formation of environmental ethics. I build from the insights of Jonathan Edwards, the American Puritan theologian. The experience of beauty creates and sustains relationships. Natural beauty is an aspect of that which holds things together, supporting life and individuation. Beauty joins experience to ethics. We experience beauty intuitively: it is an affecting experience which motivates thought and action. The experience of beauty gives us a stake in the existence of the beautiful. Ecology can (...)
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  48.  21
    Review author[S.]: J. L. Austin (1952). Critical Notice. Mind 61 (243):395-404.
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  49.  7
    Phillip J. Glenn (1998). Dis-Ease in Interaction. Beach, W.A. Conversations About Illness: Family Preoccupations with Bulimia. [REVIEW] Human Studies 21 (2):221-225.
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  50.  21
    David L. Hull & Sigrid S. Glenn (2004). Multiply Concurrent Replication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):902-904.
    If selection is interpreted as involving repeated cycles of replication, variation, and environmental interaction so structured that environmental interaction causes replication to be differential, then selection in gene-based biological evolution and the reaction of the immune system to antigens are relatively unproblematic examples of selection processes. Operant learning and cultural evolution pose more serious problems. In this response we deal with operant learning as a selection process. Footnotes1 The authors regretfully inform readers that since the publication of our target article (...)
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