Search results for 'Global feminism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Western Feminism (2005). Global Responsibility And. In Barbara S. Andrew, Jean Clare Keller & Lisa H. Schwartzman (eds.), Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. 185.score: 420.0
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  2. Black Feminism (1995). A Black Feminist Statement. In Beverly Guy-Sheftal (ed.), Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought. The New Press.score: 210.0
  3. Rosemarie Tong (2001). Towards a Feminist Global Bioethics: Addressing Women's Health Concerns Worldwide. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 9 (2):229-246.score: 204.0
    In this paper I argue that a global bioethicsis possible. Specifically, I present the viewthat there are within feminist approaches tobioethics some conceptual and methodologicaltools necessary to forge a bioethics thatembraces the health-related concerns of bothdeveloping and developed nations equally. Tosupport my argument I discuss some of thechallenges that have historically confrontedfeminists. If feminists accept the idea thatwomen are entirely the same, then feministspresent as fact the fiction of the essential``Woman.'' Not only does ``Woman'' not exist,``she'' obscures important racial, (...)
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  4. Sarah Clark Miller (2011). A Feminist Account of Global Responsibility. Social Theory and Practice 37 (3):391-412.score: 192.0
    Contemporary philosophical discourse on global responsibility has sustained a nearly unwavering focus on justice. In response, I investigate an underrepresented element in global justice discussions: insights from feminist philosophy, and more specifically, from the ethics of care. I assess current theories of cosmopolitanism, criticizing the shortcomings of cosmopolitan justice from the perspective of cosmopolitan care. Through the concepts of dependence, vulnerability, and need, I develop a feminist global obligation--the global duty to care--and explore the distinctive vision (...)
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  5. Jane Duran (2001). Worlds of Knowing: Global Feminist Epistemologies. Routledge.score: 168.0
    Jane Duran's Worlds of Knowing begins to fill an enormous gap in the literature of feminist epistemology: a wide-ranging, cross-cultural primer on worldviews and epistemologies of various cultures and their appropriations by indigenous feminist movements in those cultures. It is the much needed epistemological counterpart to work on cross-cultural feminist social and political philosophy. This project is absolutely breath-taking in scope, yet a manageable read for anyone with some background in feminist theory, history, or anthropology. Duran draws many comparisons and (...)
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  6. Katharine Schweitzer (2013). Making Feminist Sense of the Global Justice Movement. By Catherine Eschle and Bice Maiguashca Lanham., Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2010. [REVIEW] Hypatia 28 (2):388-390.score: 168.0
  7. Allison Weir (2008). Global Feminism and Transformative Identity Politics. Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 110-133.score: 156.0
    In this paper, Weir reconsiders identity politics and their relation to feminist solidarity. She argues that the dimension of identity as “identification-with” has been the liberatory dimension of identity politics, and that this dimension has been overshadowed and displaced by a focus on identity as category. Weir addresses critiques of identification as a ground of solidarity, and sketches a model of identity and identity politics based not in sameness, but in transformative historical process.
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  8. Anne McLeer (1998). Saving the Victim: Recuperating the Language of the Victim and Reassessing Global Feminism. Hypatia 13 (1):41 - 55.score: 156.0
    This paper reconsiders the use of the term "victim" in feminist theory to attempt to find common ground for the intersection and interconnection of Western and indigenous feminisms. The role of the victim in the discourse of victimology, a branch of criminology, is assessed and applied to the work of Rajeswari Sunder Rajan and Lata Mani who both examine the construction of women's subjectivity in the practice of "sati" in India.
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  9. Nilüfer Çaǧatay, Caren Grown & Aida Santiago (forthcoming). The Nairobi Women's Conference: Toward a Global Feminism? Feminist Studies.score: 156.0
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  10. Sandra Harding (1996). Multicultural and Global Feminist Philosophies of Science: Resources and Challenges. In. In Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson (eds.), Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science. 263--287.score: 156.0
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  11. Matthew J. Brown & Joyce C. Havstad, The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change: A Feminist Pragmatist Perspective.score: 156.0
    We offer a critical analysis of the science and politics of global climate change from a feminist pragmatist perspective, with special attention to the interactions between science and policy. We find the current state of play in all three areas (science, policy, and the space of interaction between them) to be lacking. We attribute mutual responsibility for the current impasse in addressing the climate crisis. What is called for is an alternative framework for thinking about science and policy interactions, (...)
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  12. Christina Ewig (2006). Hijacking Global Feminism: Feminists, the Catholic Church, and the Family Planning Debacle in Peru. Feminist Studies 32 (3):632.score: 156.0
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  13. G. K. D. Crozier (2010). Care Workers in the Global Market Appraising Applications of Feminist Care Ethics. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (1):113-137.score: 150.0
    In the current global care regime, care shortages in wealthy nations such as the United States, Canada, Italy, and Hong Kong are being addressed through the global supply of cheap migrant care labor from less wealthy nations. This paper argues that Feminist Care Ethics has a great deal to offer in the analysis of this global care regime. Joan Tronto's own critiques of the migration of care workers have focused on analogies between workers and imported slaves: both (...)
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  14. Theresa W. Tobin (2011). Global Feminist Ethics. Edited by Rebecca Whisnant and Peggy DesAutels and Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non-Ideal. Edited by Isa Tessman. Hypatia 26 (4):857-864.score: 150.0
  15. Elzbieta Matynia (2003). Provincializing Global Feminism: The Polish Case. Social Research: An International Quarterly 70 (2):499-530.score: 150.0
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  16. Kathryn Trevenen (2001). Global Feminism and the "Problem" of Culture. Theory and Event 5 (1).score: 150.0
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  17. Bat-Ami Bar On (2007). “From Hegelian Terror to Everyday Courage.” In Global Feminist Ethics. Ed. Rebecca Whisnant and Peggy DesAutels. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 150.0
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  18. Lynne S. Arnault, Bat-Ami Bar On, Alyssa R. Bernstein, Victoria Davion, Marilyn Fischer, Virginia Held, Peter Higgins, Sabrina Hom, Audra King, James L. Nelson, Serena Parekh, April Shaw & Joan Tronto (2007). Global Feminist Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 150.0
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  19. Jacqueline Pitanguy (2002). Bridging the Local and the Global: Feminism in Brazil and the International Human Rights Agenda. Social Research: An International Quarterly 69 (3):805-820.score: 150.0
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  20. Rebecca Whisnant & Peggy DesAutels (eds.) (2008). Global Feminist Ethics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 150.0
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  21. Rebecca Wisnant, Peggy Desautels, Lynn Arnault & Bat-Ami Bar On (eds.) (2010). Global Feminist Ethics. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 150.0
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  22. Brooke A. Ackerly (2009). Feminist Theory, Global Gender Justice, and the Evaluation of Grant Making. Philosophical Topics 37 (2):179-198.score: 144.0
    In activist circles feminist political thought is often viewed as abstract because it does not help activists make the kinds of arguments that are generally effective with donors and policy makers. The feminist political philosopher's focus on how we know and what counts as knowledge is a large step away from the terrain in which activists make their arguments to donors. Yet, philosophical reflection on the relations between power and knowledge can make a significant contribution to women's human rights work (...)
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  23. Jane Duran (2008). Global Bioethics and Feminist Epistemology. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2):303-310.score: 144.0
    Lines of argument to support the notion that global bioethics can use work from feminist epistemology are set out, and much of the support for such contentions comes from specific cases of ethical issues in indigenous cultures. Theorists such as Kuhse, Arizpe, Egnor and Bumiller are cited, and it is concluded that local feminist epistemologies often conflict with standard ethical views, but that the failure to incorporate feminist thought undercuts hopes to establish a viable bioethics on an international scale.
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  24. Carole R. McCann & Seung-Kyung Kim (eds.) (2003). Feminist Theory Reader: Local and Global Perspectives. Routledge.score: 138.0
    The "Feminist Theory Reader" provides a revolutionary new approach to anthologizing the important works in feminist theory by incorporating the voices of women ...
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  25. Peter Waterman (1993). Hidden From Herstory: Women, Feminism, and the New Global Solidarity. Publications Office, Institute of Social Studies.score: 132.0
     
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  26. Angie Pepper (2014). A Feminist Argument Against Statism: Public and Private in Theories of Global Justice. Journal of Global Ethics 10 (1):56-70.score: 126.0
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  27. Wendy Lynne Lee (2010). Contemporary Feminist Theory and Activism: Six Global Issues. Broadview.score: 126.0
    From divorce and property law to (more) equal pay and the recognition of reproductive rights, feminist theory and practice –– and sweat, risk, ...
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  28. Victoria Davion (2009). Feminist Perspectives on Global Warming, Genocide, and Card's Theory of Evil. Hypatia 24 (1):160 - 177.score: 126.0
    This essay explores several moral issues raised by global warming through the lens of Claudia Card's theory of evil. I focus on Alaskan villages in the sub-Arctic whose residents must relocate owing to extreme erosion, melting sea ice, and rising water levels. I use Card's discussion of genocide as social death to argue that failure to help these groups maintain their unique cultural identities can be thought of as genocidal.
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  29. Alison Jaggar (2005). Global Responsibility and Western Feminism. In Barbara S. Andrew, Jean Clare Keller & Lisa H. Schwartzman (eds.), Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. 185--200.score: 126.0
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  30. Wang Zheng & Zhang Yin (2010). Global Concepts, Local Practices-Chinese Feminism Since the Fourth UN Conference on Women. Feminist Studies 36 (1):40-70.score: 126.0
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  31. Jayati Lal, Kristin McGuire, Abigail J. Stewart, Magdalena Zaborowska & Justine M. Pas (2010). Recasting Global Feminisms: Toward a Comparative Historical Approach to Women's Activism and Feminist Scholarship. Feminist Studies 36 (1):13-39.score: 126.0
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  32. Susan Hekman (2006). Book Review: Nancy Hirschmann. The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom. And Seyla Benhabib. The Claims of Culture: Equality and Diversity in the Global Era. [REVIEW] Hypatia 21 (3):190-194.score: 120.0
  33. Herjeet Marway (2010). Contemporary Feminist Theory and Activism: Six Global Issues – By W. L. Lee. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (4):427-429.score: 120.0
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  34. Susan J. Hekman (2006). The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom, And: The Claims of Culture: Equality and Diversity in the Global Era (Review). Hypatia 21 (3):190-194.score: 120.0
  35. Stefania Travagnin (2013). Review of Hu, Hsiao-Lan, This-Wordly Nibbāna: A Buddhist-Feminist Social Ethic for Peacemaking in the Global Community. [REVIEW] Sophia 52 (4):711-713.score: 120.0
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  36. Nayereh Tohidi (2002). The Global-Local Intersection of Feminism in Muslim Societies: The Cases of Iran and Azerbaijan. Social Research: An International Quarterly 69 (3):851-887.score: 120.0
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  37. Frédérique Villemur (2009). Cornelia Butler, Wack ! Art and the Feminist Revolution, Los Angeles, Museum of Contemporary Art, 2007, 512 pages. Maura Reilly, Linda Nochlin, Global Feminisms:New Directions inContemporary Art, New York, Merrell, 2007, 304 pages. [REVIEW] Clio 1:261-263.score: 120.0
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  38. Shari Stone-Mediatore (2009). Cross-Border Feminism: Shifting the Terms of Debate for Us and European Feminists. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (1):57 – 71.score: 108.0
    Recent decades of women's rights advocacy have produced numerous regional and international agreements for protecting women's security, including a UN convention that affirms the state's responsibility to protect key gender-specific rights, with no exceptions on the basis of culture or religion. At the same time, however, the focus on universal women's rights has enabled influential feminists in the United States to view women's rights in opposition to culture, and most often in opposition to other people's cultures. Not surprisingly, then, feminists (...)
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  39. Shari Stone-Mediatore (2011). A Not-So-Global Ethics. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 18 (1):43-57.score: 84.0
    This paper traces the ethnocentric structure of U.S.-published anthologies in global ethics and related fields and it examines the ethical and philosophical implications of such ethnocentrism. The author argues that the ethnocentric structure of prominent work in global ethics not only impairs the field's ability to prepare students for global citizenship but contributes to the ideological processes that maintain global inequities. In conclusion, the author makes a case that fuller engagement with global-South and indigenous writers (...)
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  40. Shari Stone-Mediatore (2004). Women's Rights and Cultural Differences. Studies in Practical Philosophy 4 (2):111-133.score: 84.0
    The rights of women in fundamentalist Muslim countries has become a cause celebre for many North American women; however, the problem of how to balance respect for women's rights and respect for cultural differences remains in dispute, even within feminist theory. This paper explores how U.S. feminists who are serious about supporting the struggles of women across cultural borders might best adjudicate the seeming tension between women's rights and cultural autonomy. Upon examining 4 representative approaches to this problem, the paper (...)
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  41. Penny Enslin (2006). Democracy, Social Justice and Education: Feminist Strategies in a Globalising World. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (1):57–67.score: 78.0
  42. Anca Gheaus (2013). Care Drain as an Issue of Global Gender Justice. Ethical Perspectives 20 (1).score: 78.0
  43. Maura Brighenti (2013). Introduzione. Scienza and Politica. Per Una Storia Delle Dottrine 25 (49).score: 72.0
    The introduction describes the monographic section of Scienza & Politica dedicated to the innovations which postcolonial and feminist studies in Latin America are introducing in the history of political thought as a whole. The fundamental concepts of the following essays are presented here to introduce their historic and critic analysis. It is also highlighted the specific character of continental laboratory which the historic and political reflection is assuming in South American continent and the connections which are occurring with other countries (...)
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  44. Virginia Held (2006). The Ethics of Care: Personal, Political, and Global. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Virginia Held assesses the ethics of care as a promising alternative to the familiar moral theories that serve so inadequately to guide our lives. The ethics of care is only a few decades old, yet it is by now a distinct moral theory or normative approach to the problems we face. It is relevant to global and political matters as well as to the personal relations that can most clearly exemplify care. This book clarifies just what the ethics of (...)
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  45. Margaret Urban Walker (2007). Moral Understandings: A Feminist Study in Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    This is a revised edition of Walker's well-known book in feminist ethics first published in 1997. Walker's book proposes a view of morality and an approach to ethical theory which uses the critical insights of feminism and race theory to rethink the epistemological and moral position of the ethical theorist, and how moral theory is inescapably shaped by culture and history. The main gist of her book is that morality is embodied in "practices of responsibility" that express our identities, (...)
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  46. Margaret Ledwith (2009). Antonio Gramsci and Feminism: The Elusive Nature of Power. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (6):684-697.score: 66.0
    From a feminist perspective, I am interested in 'women's ways of knowing' ( Belenky et al., 1997 ) and the relationship between knowledge, difference and power ( Goldberger et al., 1996 ). Here I trace the relevance of Gramsci to my own feminist consciousness, and the part he played in my journey to praxis. I also address feminism's intellectual debts, most particularly in relation to the concept of hegemony. The intellectual context has shifted in emphasis from macro- to micro-narratives (...)
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  47. Judy D. Whipps (2004). Jane Addams's Social Thought as a Model for a Pragmatist-Feminist Communitarianism. Hypatia 19 (2):118-133.score: 66.0
    This paper argues that communitarian philosophy can be an important philosophic resource for feminist thinkers, particularly when considered in the light of Jane Addams's (1860-1935) feminist-pragmatism. Addams's communitarianism requires progressive change as well as a moral duty to seek out diverse voices. Contrary to some contemporary communitarians, Addams extends her concept of community to include interdependent global communities, such as the global community of women peace workers.
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  48. Margaret J. Somerville (2010). A Place Pedagogy for 'Global Contemporaneity'. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (3):326-344.score: 66.0
    Around the globe people are confronted daily with intransigent problems of space and place. Educators have historically called for place-based or place-conscious education to introduce pedagogies that will address such questions as how to develop sustainable communities and places. These calls for place-conscious education have included liberal humanist approaches that evolved from the work of Wendell Berry (Ball & Lai, 2006) and critical place-based approaches such as those advocated by David Gruenewald (e.g. Gruenewald, 2003a, 2003b). In this paper I will (...)
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  49. Lisa Sowle Cahill (2007). Theological Ethics, the Churches, and Global Politics. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):377 - 399.score: 66.0
    Several discourses about theology, church, and politics are occurring among Christian theologians in the United States. One influential strand centers on the communitarian theology of Stanley Hauerwas, who calls on Christians to witness faithfully against liberalism in general and war in particular. Jeffrey Stout, in his widely discussed "Democracy and Tradition" (2004), responds that religious people ought precisely to endorse those democratic and liberal American traditions that join religious and secular counterparts to battle injustice. Hauerwas, Stout, and many of their (...)
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