Search results for 'God' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Erik Wielenberg (2009). Dawkins's Gambit, Hume's Aroma, and God's Simplicity. Philosophia Christi 11 (1):113-127.score: 24.0
    I examine the central atheistic argument of Richard Dawkinss book The God Delusion (“Dawkinss Gambit”) and illustrate its failure. I further show that Dawkinss Gambit (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Arman Hovhannisyan, God and Reality.score: 24.0
    Metaphysics has done everything to involve God in the world of being. However, in case of considering Reality as being and nothingness, naturally, the metaphysical approach toward (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Stewart Duncan (2005). Knowledge of God in Leviathan. History of Philosophy Quarterly 22 (1):31-48.score: 24.0
    Hobbes denies in Leviathan that we have an idea of God. He does think, though, that God exists, and does not even deny that we can think (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Andrew Chignell & Dean Zimmerman (2012). Review: Saving God From Saving God. [REVIEW] Books and Culture 15 (3).score: 24.0
    Mark Johnstons book, Saving God (Princeton University Press, 2010) has two main goals, one negative and the other positive: (1) to eliminate the gods of the (...)major Western monotheisms (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) as candidates for the role ofthe Highest One”; (2) to introduce the real Highest One, a panentheistic deity worthy of devotion and capable of extending to us the grace needed to transform us from inwardly-turned sinners to practitioners of agape. In this review, we argue that Johnstons attack on traditional forms of monotheism has less force than his criticism of theundergraduate atheists” (e.g., Hitchens, Harris, Dawkins); and that his candidate for Highest One is not the greatest possible being, and so could not play the role Johnston casts for it. -/- . (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Guy Kahane (2011). Should We Want God to Exist? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (3):674-696.score: 24.0
    Whether God exists is a metaphysical question. But there is also a neglected evaluative question about Gods existence: Should we want God to exist? Very many, (...)including many atheists and agnostics, appear to think we should. Theists claim that if God didnt exist things would be far worse, and many atheists agree; they regret Gods inexistence. Some remarks by Thomas Nagel suggest an opposing view: that we should want God not to exist. I call this view anti-theism. I explain how such view can be coherent, and why it might be correct. Anti-theism must be distinguished from the argument from evil or the denial of Gods goodness; it is a claim about the goodness of Gods existence. Anti-theists must claim that its a logical consequence of Gods existence that things are worse in certain respects. The problem is that Gods existence would also make things better in many ways. Given that Gods existence is likely to be impersonally better overall, anti-theists face a challenge similar to that facing nonconsequentialists. I explore two ways of meeting this challenge. (shrink)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Richard Swinburne (2004). The Existence of God. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Richard Swinburne presents a substantially rewritten and updated edition of his most celebrated book. No other work has made a more powerful case for the probability of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Danny Frederick (2013). A Puzzle About Natural Laws and the Existence of God. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (3):269-283.score: 24.0
    The existence of natural laws, whether deterministic or indeterministic, and whether exceptionless or ceteris paribus, seems puzzling because it implies that mindless bits of matter behave in (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jim Stone (1998). Free Will as a Gift From God: A New Compatibilism. Philosophical Studies 92 (3):257-81.score: 24.0
    I argue that God could give us the robust power to do other than we do in a deterministic universe.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. William P. Alston (1991). Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience. Cornell University Press.score: 24.0
    Introduction i. Character of the Book The central thesis of this book is that experiential awareness of God, or as I shall be saying, the perception of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Steven M. Duncan, Kant's Pre-Critical Proof for God's Existence.score: 24.0
    In his Beweisgrund (1762), Kant presents a sketch of "the only possible basis" for a proof of God's existence. In this essay, I attempt to (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Rob Lovering (2012). On the Morality of Having Faith That God Exists. Sophia 51 (1):17-30.score: 24.0
    Many theists who identify themselves with the Abrahamic religions (Christianity, Judaism, and Islam) maintain that it is perfectly acceptable to have faith that God exists. In this (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Brooke Alan Trisel (2012). God's Silence as an Epistemological Concern. Philosophical Forum 43 (4):383-393.score: 24.0
    Throughout history, many people, including Mother Teresa, have been troubled by Gods silence. In spite of the conflicting interpretations of the Bible, God has remained silent. (...)What are the implications of divine hiddenness/silence for a meaning of life? Is there a good reason that explains Gods silence? If God created humanity to fulfill a purpose, then God would have clarified his purpose and our role by now, as I will argue. To help God carry out his purpose, we would need to have a clear understanding of our role. Thus, by failing to clarify our role, God would be undermining himself in achieving the purpose he conceived, which would not make sense. Because God, if he exists, would not engage in this self-defeating behavior, this suggests that humanity was not created by God to fulfill a purpose. (shrink)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Andrew A. Fingelkurts (2009). Is Our Brain Hardwired to Produce God, or is Our Brain Hardwired to Perceive God? A Systematic Review on the Role of the Brain in Mediating Religious Experience. Cognitive Processing 10 (4):293-326.score: 24.0
    To figure out whether the main empirical questionIs our brain hardwired to believe in and produce God, or is our brain hardwired to perceive and experience (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Hugh Chandler, Paley's 'Proof' of the Existence of God.score: 24.0
    Paleysproofof the existence of God, or some supposed version of it, is well known. In this paper I offer the real thing and two (...)objections to it. One objection is Hume's, and the other is provided by Darwin. (shrink)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Daniel von Wachter (2002). The Necessity of God's Existence. In A. Beckermann & C. Nimtz (eds.), Argument & Analyse. Mentis. 516-525, http://epub.ub.uni-muen.score: 24.0
    It is spelled out in which sense God exists necessarily. Some contemporary accounts are criticised.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Paolo Diego Bubbio (2014). God, Incarnation, and Metaphysics in Hegel's Philosophy of Religion. Sophia:1-19.score: 24.0
    In this article, I draw upon thepost-Kantianreading of Hegel to examine the consequences Hegels idea of God has on his metaphysics. In particular, I (...) apply Hegelsrecognition-theoreticapproach to his theology. Within the context of this analysis, I focus especially on the incarnation and sacrifice of Christ. First, I argue that Hegels philosophy of religion employs a distinctive notion of sacrifice (kenotic sacrifice). Here, sacrifice is conceived as a giving up something of oneself tomake roomfor the other. Second, I argue that the idea of kenotic sacrifice plays a fundamental role in Hegels account of Christ. Third, I conclude by sketching some of the consequences of Hegels idea of a God who renounces his own divinity for an idealistically conceived metaphysics. My main thesis is that the notion of incarnation is conceived by Hegel as the expression of a spirit that advances only insofar as it is willing to withdraw and make room for the other. A kenotic reading of the Hegelian notion of the incarnation is also useful in terms of a clarification of the dispute betweenleft Hegeliansandright Hegeliansconcerning the status of the idea of God in Hegels philosophy. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Jeremy Gwiazda (2010). Richard Swinburne, the Existence of God, and Exact Numerical Values. Philosophia 38 (2):357-363.score: 24.0
    Richard Swinburnes argument in The Existence of God discusses many probabilities, ultimately concluding that God probably exists. Swinburne gives exact values to almost none of these (...)probabilities. I attempted to assign values to the probabilities that met that weak condition that they could be correct. In this paper, I first present a brief outline of Swinburnes argument in The Existence of God. I then present the problems I encountered in Swinburnes argument, specifically problems that interfered with my attempt to arrive at values for the probabilities discussed by Swinburne. Finally, I suggest that Swinburnes argument would be more persuasive if he assigned exact values to his probabilities. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Rob Lovering (2009). On What God Would Do. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 66 (2):87 - 104.score: 24.0
    Many debates in the philosophy of religion, particularly arguments for and against the existence of God, depend on a claim or set of claims about what God (...)qua sovereign, omnipotent, omniscient, and perfectly good beingwould do , either directly or indirectly, in particular cases or in general. Accordingly, before these debates can be resolved we must first settle the more fundamental issue of whether we can know, or at least have justified belief about, what God would do. In this paper, I lay out the possible positions on the issue of whether we can know what God would do, positions I refer to as Broad Skeptical Theism, Broad Epistemic Theism, and Narrow Skeptical Theism. I then examine the implications of each of these views and argue that each presents serious problems for theism. (shrink)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Henk van den Belt (2009). Playing God in Frankenstein's Footsteps: Synthetic Biology and the Meaning of Life. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 3 (3):257-268.score: 24.0
    The emergent new science of synthetic biology is challenging entrenched distinctions between, amongst others, life and non-life, the natural and the artificial, the evolved and the (...)designed, and even the material and the informational. Whenever such culturally sanctioned boundaries are breached, researchers are inevitably accused of playing God or treading in Frankensteins footsteps. Bioethicists, theologians and editors of scientific journals feel obliged to provide an authoritative answer to the ambiguous question of themeaningof life, both as a scientific definition and as an explication with wider existential connotations. This article analyses the arguments mooted in the emerging societal debates on synthetic biology and the way its practitioners respond to criticism, mostly by assuming a defiant posture or professing humility. It explores the relationship between theplaying Godtheme and the Frankenstein motif and examines the doctrinal status of theplaying Godargument. One particularly interesting finding is that liberal theologians generally deny the religious character of theplaying Godargumenta response which fits in with the curious fact that this argument is used mainly by secular organizations. Synthetic biology, it is therefore maintained, does not offend so much the God of the Bible as a deified Nature. While syntheses of artificial life forms cause some vague uneasiness that life may lose its special meaning, most concerns turn out to be narrowly anthropocentric. As long as synthetic biology creates only new microbial life and does not directly affect human life, it will in all likelihood be considered acceptable. (shrink)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2007). The Neighbor and the Infinite: Marion and Levinas on the Encounter Between Self, Human Other, and God. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 40 (3):231-249.score: 24.0
    In this article I examine Jean-Luc Marion's two-fold criticism of Emmanuel Levinasphilosophy of other and self, namely that Levinas remains unable to overcome ontological (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. William Lane Craig (2004). God?: A Debate Between a Christian and an Atheist. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The question of whether or not God exists is endlessly fascinating and profoundly important. Now two articulate spokesmen--one a Christian, the other an atheist--duel over God (...)'s existence in a lively and illuminating battle of ideas. In God?, William Lane Craig and Walter Sinnott-Armstrong bring to the printed page two debates they held before live audiences, preserving all the wit, clarity, and immediacy of their public exchanges. With none of the opaque discourse of academic logicians and divinity-school theologians, the authors make claims and comebacks that cut with precision. Their arguments are sharp and humorous, as each philosopher strikes quickly to the heart of his opponent's case. For example, Craig claims that we must believe in God to explain objective moral values, such as why rape is wrong. Sinnott-Armstrong responds that what makes rape wrong is the harm to victims of rape, so rape is immoral even if there is no God. From arguments about the nature of infinity and the Big Bang, to religious experience and divine action, to the resurrection of Jesus and the problem of evil, the authors treat us to a remarkable display of intelligence and insight--a truly thought-provoking exploration of a classic issue that remains relevant to contemporary life. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Martin Lin (2007). Spinoza's Arguments for the Existence of God. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):269-297.score: 24.0
    It is often thought that, although <span class='Hi'>Spinoza</span> develops a bold and distinctive conception of God (the unique substance, or Natura Naturans, (...)in which all else inheres and which possesses infinitely many attributes, including extension), the arguments that he offers which purport to prove Gods existence contribute nothing new to natural theology. Rather, he is seen as just another participant in the seventeenthcentury revival of the ontological argument initiated by Descartes and taken up by Malebranche and Leibniz among others. That this is the case is both puzzling and unfortunate. It is puzzling because although <span class='Hi'>Spinoza</span> does offer an ontological proof for the existence of God, he also offers three other non-ontological proofs. It is unfortunate because these other non-ontological proofs are both more convincing and more interesting than his ontological proof. In this paper, I offer reconstructions and assessments of all of <span class='Hi'>Spinoza</span>’s arguments and argue that <span class='Hi'>Spinoza</span>’s metaphysical rationalism and his commitment to something like a Principle of Sufficient Reason are the driving force behind <span class='Hi'>Spinoza</span>’s non-ontological arguments. (shrink)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Robert K. Garcia (2013). Is God's Benevolence Impartial? Southwest Philosophy Review 29 (1):23-30.score: 24.0
    In this paper I consider the intuitive idea that God is fair and does not play favorites. This belief appears to be held by many theists. I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Anselm K. Min (2006). Naming the Unnameable God: Levinas, Derrida, and Marion. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):99 - 116.score: 24.0
    In this essay I present the postmodern phenomenological approach of Levinas, Derrida, and Marion to the problem of naming the unnameable God. For Levinas, God is never (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Hugh Chandler, Personal God or Something Greater.score: 24.0
    Alvin Plantinga says that according to classical Muslim, Jewish, and Christian belief, God is a person. (He spells out some of the characteristics of people as such.) (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. W. J. Mander (2013). On Arguing for the Existence of God as a Synthesis Between Realism and Anti-Realism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (1):99-115.score: 24.0
    This article examines a somewhat neglected argument for the existence of God which appeals to the divine perspective as a way of reconciling the conflicting claims of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Robert Oakes (2008). Life, Death, and the Hiddenness of God. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 64 (3):155 - 160.score: 24.0
    Many philosophers have contended that (traditional) theism or supernaturalism suffers from what can properly be called the Problem of Divine Hiddenness (the PDH ). [See Howard-Snyder and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Duncan Macintosh (1994). Could God Have Made the Big Bang? (On Theistic Counterfactuals). Dialogue 33 (01):3-20.score: 24.0
    Quentin Smith argues that if God exists, He had a duty to ensure life's existence; and He couldn't rationally have done so and made a big (...) bang unless a counter-factual like "If God had made a big bang, there would have been life," was true pre-creation. But such counter-factuals are not true pre-creation. I argue that God could have made a big bang without irrationality; and that He could have ensured life without making big bangs non-random. Further, a proper understanding of the truth-conditions of counter-factuals like the one above lets them have determinate truth-values pre-creation. But the explanation of how the above counter-factual can be true pre-creation is more complicated than that offered by William Lane Craig. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. David Braine (1988). The Reality of Time and the Existence of God: The Project of Proving God's Existence. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Basing his argument for the existence of God on the continuous nature of the temporal world, Braine here posits that the philosophy of religion cannot be continued (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Hugh Chandler, Does God Necessarly Exist?score: 24.0
    If God necessarily exists this has some interesting consequences. In this little note I mention some of these.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jesse R. Steinberg (2007). Concerning the Preservation of God's Omnipotence. Sophia 46 (1):1-5.score: 24.0
    Numerous examples have been offered that purportedly show that God cannot be omnipotent. I argue that a common response to such examples (i.e., that failure to (...)do the impossible does not indicate a lack of power) does not preserve Gods omnipotence in the face of some of these examples. I consider another possible strategy for preserving Gods omnipotence in the face of these examples and find it wanting. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Richard Swinburne (2011). Gwiazda on the Bayesian Argument for God. Philosophia 39 (2):393-396.score: 24.0
    Jeremy Gwiazda made two criticisms of my formulation in terms of Bayess theorem of my probabilistic argument for the existence of God. The first criticism depends (...)on his assumption that I claim that the intrinsic probabilities of all propositions depend almost entirely on their simplicity; however, my claim is that that holds only insofar as those propositions are explanatory hypotheses. The second criticism depends on a claim that the intrinsic probabilities of exclusive and exhaustive explanatory hypotheses of a phenomenon must sum to 1; however it is only those probabilities plus the intrinsic probability of the non-occurrence of the phenomenon which must sum to 1. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Moti Mizrahi (2011). A Pedagogical Challenge in Teaching Arguments for the Existence of God. APA Newsletter on Teaching Philosophy 11 (1):10-12.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I describe the way in which I introduce arguments for the existence of God to undergraduate students in Introduction to Philosophy.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Daniel von Wachter (2007). God as Substance Without Substance Ontology. In Christian Kanzian & Muhammed Legenhausen (eds.), Substance and Attribute: Western and Islamic Traditions in Dialogue.score: 24.0
    This article spells out the reasons for calling God a substance and argues that theism nevertheless does not require substance ontology. It is compatible with an alternative (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Jeremy Gwiazda (2009). Richard Swinburne, the Existence of God, and Principle P. Sophia 48 (4):393-398.score: 24.0
    Swinburne relies on principle P in The Existence of God to argue that God is simple and thus likely to exist. In this paper, I argue that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Christopher Hughes (1989). On a Complex Theory of a Simple God: An Investigation in Aquinas' Philosophical Theology. Cornell University Press.score: 24.0
    [I] Divine Simplicity: God and His Existence Types of Divine Simplicity Of the properties ascribed to God in Aquinas' natural theology, we may call one sort ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Ted Peters (2007). Models of God. Philosophia 35 (3-4):273-288.score: 24.0
    This essay compares and contrasts nine different conceptual models of God: atheism, agnosticism, deism, theism, pantheism, polytheism, henotheism, panentheism, and eschatological panentheism. This essay justifies employment of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Graham Robert Oppy (1995). Ontological Arguments and Belief in God. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This book is a unique contribution to the philosophy of religion. It offers a comprehensive discussion of one of the most famous arguments for the existence of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Stephen R. Palmquist (2009). Kant's Religious Argument for the Existence of God. Faith and Philosophy 26 (1):3-22.score: 24.0
    After reviewing Kants well-known criticisms of the traditional proofs of Gods existence and his preferred moral argument, this paper presents a detailed analysis of a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. D. Z. Phillips (2007). William Hasker's Avoidance of the Problems of Evil and God (or: On Looking Outside the Igloo). [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (1):33 - 42.score: 24.0
    Our Book Review Editor, James Keller, invited William Hasker to write a review of the Book by D.Z. Phillips, The Problem of Evil and the Problem (...)of God and then in consultation with the Editor-in-Chief invited Phillips to respond. Aware of both their respect for each other and their philosophical differences we planned that Haskers review and Phillipsresponse would appear in the same issue of the International Journal for Philosophy of Religion. Unfortunately that was not to be. Dewi, as he was known to his many friends throughout the world, collapsed at his desk on 25 July, 2006 in the library of his beloved University of Wales, Swansea. Although we were not able to have the review and response appear in the same issue as we had all planned, we are now printing his response to Haskers review, “D.Z. Phillipss Problems with Evil and with God,” which appeared in IJPR, Vol. 61,3. Dewi had completed the review and thanks to the efforts of Helen Baldwin who prepared the manuscript and Dewis wife, Monica, and family we are able to print it here. Since Dewi was responding to an earlier version of Haskers review, a few minor editorial changes have been made. Dewis death is a great loss to the philosophical community and a deep personal loss to his family and friends, but I am confident that he would be pleased to have this response appear. He might even have a story to tell, a comment that those who knew him well will fully understand. Eugene Thomas Long. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Steven Reiss (2004). The Sixteen Strivings for God. Zygon 39 (2):303-320.score: 24.0
    . A psychological theory of religious experiences, sensitivity theory, is proposed. Whereas other theories maintain that religious motivation is about a few overarching desires, sensitivity theory provides a (...) multifaceted analysis consistent with the diversity, richness, and individuality of religious experiences. Sixteen basic desires show the psychological foundations of meaningful experience. Each basic desire is embraced by every person, but to different extents. How we prioritize the basic desires expresses our individuality and influences our attraction to various religious images and activities. Each basic desire is associated with a basic goal and a unique joy, such as love, self-worth, relaxation, or strength. We do not seek to experience joys infinitely; we regulate joys, in accordance with our core values, to sixteen balance points (sensitivities) that vary based on individuality. Religions help persons of faith regulate the sixteen basic joys by providing some images that strengthen joyful experiences and others that weaken them. We can strengthen our experience of self- worth, for example, by contemplating God in the image of savior; we can weaken our experience of self-worth by contemplating original sin. The theory of sixteen basic desires is testable scientifically and suggests such philosophical concepts as value-based happiness. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. John Foster (2004). The Divine Lawmaker: Lectures on Induction, Laws of Nature, and the Existence of God. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    John Foster presents a clear and powerful discussion of a range of topics relating to our understanding of the universe: induction, laws of nature, and the existence (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Richard Messer (1993). Does God's Existence Need Proof? Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The possibility of proving the existence of God has fascinated thinkers and believers throughout the centuries. This book critically analyzes both sides of the contemporary debate between (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Jordan Howard Sobel (2004). Logic and Theism: Arguments for and Against Beliefs in God. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This is a wide-ranging book about arguments for and against belief in God.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Richard M. Gale (1991). On the Nature and Existence of God. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    There has been in recent years a plethora of defenses of theism from analytical philosophers such as Plantinga, Swinburne, and Alston. Richard Gale's important book is (...)a critical response to these writings. New versions of cosmological, ontological, and religious experience arguments are critically evaluated, along with pragmatic arguments to justify faith on the grounds of its prudential or moral benefits. A special feature of the book is the discussion of the atheological argument that attempts to deduce a contradiction from the theist's way of conceiving of God's nature. In considering arguments for and against the existence of God, Gale is able to clarify many important philosophical concepts including exploration, time, free will, personhood, actuality, and the objectivity of experience. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Rik Peels (2011). Sin and Human Cognition of God. Scottish Journal of Theology 64 (4):390-409.score: 24.0
    In this paper I argue that the effects of sin for our cognition of God primarily consist in a lack of knowledge by acquaintance of God and (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Mark Walker (2009). The Anthropic Argument Against the Existence of God. Sophia 48 (4):351 - 378.score: 24.0
    If God is morally perfect then He must perform the morally best actions, but creating humans is not the morally best action. If this line of reasoning (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Brian Davies (2011). Thomas Aquinas on God and Evil. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The problem of evil -- Aquinas, philosophy, and theology -- What there is -- Goodness and badness -- God the creator -- God's perfection and goodness -- The creator and (...)evil -- Providence and grace -- The trinity and Christ -- Aquinas on god and evil. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Stephen Maitzen (2007). Skeptical Theism and God's Commands. Sophia 46 (3):237-243.score: 24.0
    According to Michael Almeida and Graham Oppy, adherents of skeptical theism will find their sense of moral obligation undermined in a potentiallyappallingway. Michael Bergmann and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Mark S. Schwartz (2006). God as a Managerial Stakeholder? Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2/3):291 - 306.score: 24.0
    Can or should God be considered a managerial stakeholder? While at first glance such a proposition might seem beyond the norms of stakeholder management theory or traditional (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000