Search results for 'God (Hinduism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  11
    Parimal G. Patil (2009). Against a Hindu God: Buddhist Philosophy of Religion in India. Columbia University Press.
    Comparative philosophy of religions -- Disciplinary challenges -- A grammar for comparison -- Comparative philosophy of religions -- Content, structure, and arguments -- Epistemology -- Religious epistemology in classical India: in defense of a Hindu god -- Interpreting Nyāya epistemology -- The Nyāya argument for the existence of Īśvara -- Defending the Nyāya argument -- Shifting the burden of proof -- Against Īśvara: Ratnakīrti's Buddhist critique -- The section on pervasion: the trouble with natural relations -- Two arguments -- The (...)
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  2. P. B. Vidyarthi (1978). Knowledge, Self, and God in Ramanuja. Oriental Publishers & Distributors.
     
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  3. Manju Dube (1984). Conceptions of God in Vaiṣṇava Philosophical Systems. Sanjay Book Centre.
     
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  4. Gandhi (1962). God is Truth. Bombay, Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.
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  5. Gandhi (1957). God is Truth. Bombay, Published for Anand T. Hingorani by Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.
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  6. Albertina Nugteren (1991). God as an Alternative?: The Meditative Process of Īśvarapraṇidhāna in the Yogasūtras of Patañjali and the Commentaries on Them. Garant.
     
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  7. A. K. Srivastava (1976). God and its Relation with the Finite Self in Tagore's Philosophy. Oriental Publishers.
     
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  8. Pritam Sen (1995). God's Love in Upanishad Philosophies. Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.
     
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  9.  14
    Ellen Stansell (2010). Suturing the Body Corporate (Divine and Human) in the Brahmanic Traditions. Sophia 49 (2):237-259.
    In this discussion, we ponder the discourse about the ‘body of the Divine’ in the Indian tradition. Beginning with the Vedas, we survey the major eras and thinkers of that tradition, considering various notions of the Supreme Divine Being it produced. For each, we ask: is the Divine embodied? If so, then in what way? What is the nature of the body of the Divine, and what is its relationship to human bodies? What is the value of the body of (...)
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  10.  11
    Zoran Kinđić (2010). The Problem of Evil in Hinduism. Filozofija I Društvo 21 (1):209-224.
    After having pointed to the different religious concepts of the origin of evil, the author focuses on the discussion of Hinduism as a typical paradigm of monism. Since the Indian deities are actually manifestations of the eternal arch principle, they contain within themselves the unity of opposites, i.e. they have both light and dark side. Evil which affects an individual is interpreted as sinning against the universal cosmic and moral order. The doctrine that man's destiny is determined by one's deeds (...)
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  11. Mark W. Muesse (2003). Great World Religions, Hinduism. Teaching Co..
    Lecture 1. Hinduism in the world and the world of Hinduism -- Lecture 2. The early cultures of India -- Lecture 3. The world of the Veda -- Lecture 4. From the Vedic tradition to classical Hinduism -- Lecture 5. Caste -- Lecture 6. Men, women, and the stages of life -- Lecture 7. The way of action -- Lecture 8. The way of wisdom -- Lecture 9. Seeing God -- Lecture 10. The way of devotion -- Lecture 11. The (...)
     
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  12. George Chemparathy (1972). An Indian Rational Theology. Delhi,Motilal Banarsidass in Komm.).
     
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  13. P. B. Vidyarthi (1978). Divine Personality and Human Life in Ramanuja. Oriental Publishers & Distributors.
     
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  14. Amarnath Bhattacharya (1988). Foundation of Theism: An Indian Approach. Sanskrit Pustak Bhandar.
     
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  15. Nityagopal Deva (1968). The Philosophy of Union by Devotion. Nabadwip, West Bengal, Mahanirban Math.
     
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  16. Ādiśeṣa (1980). The Essence of Supreme Truth (Paramārthasāra): Sanskrit Text. E.J. Brill.
     
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  17. Gandhi (1944). The Unseen Power. Lahore, Indian Printing Works.
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  18. Sen Gupta & Surendra Nath (1972). Abc of Satya Dharma and its Philosophy. [Calcutta,Nani Gopal Sen Gupta; to Be Had of Oxford Book and Stationery Co., New Delhi.
     
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  19. Dilip Kumar Mishra (2007). Nyāyaviśiṣṭādvaitamatayoḥ Īśvaratattvavicāraḥ. Rāṣṭriyasaṃskr̥taviśvavidyālayaḥ.
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  20. Satchidananda Mishra (2004). Īśvaraparyālocanam =. Bhāratīya Vidyā Prakāśana.
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  21. Raghudeva Nyāyālaṅkara (2003). Īśvaravādaḥ. Sampūrṇānanda-Saṃskr̥ta-Viśvavidyālaye.
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  22. Geevarghese Mar Osthathios (2007). Atr̲aitadaivaśāstr̲avuṃ Snēhattint̲e Ēkamatavuṃ. Ḍi. Si. Buks.
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  23. A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupāda (1972). Easy Journey to Other Planets, by Practice of Supreme Yoga. New York,Macmillan.
     
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  24. A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupāda (1970). Easy Journey to Other Planets. Boston,Iskon Press.
     
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  25. Ramsukhdas (2009). Discovery of Truth and Immortality. Gita Press.
  26. Jadunath Sinha (1978). Moral Idealism & Theism. Jadunath Sinha Foundation.
     
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  27. John Vattanky (1993). Development of Nyāya Theism. Intercultural Publications.
     
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  28. Virajananda (1950). Toward the Goal Supreme. Hollywood, Calif.,Vedanta Press.
     
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  29. David Bentley Hart (2013). The Experience of God: Being, Consciousness, Bliss. Yale University Press.
    Despite the recent ferocious public debate about belief, the concept most central to the discussion—God—frequently remains vaguely and obscurely described. Are those engaged in these arguments even talking about the same thing? In a wide-ranging response to this confusion, esteemed scholar David Bentley Hart pursues a clarification of how the word “God” functions in the world’s great theistic faiths. Ranging broadly across Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Vedantic and Bhaktic Hinduism, Sikhism, and Buddhism, Hart explores how these great intellectual traditions treat humanity’s (...)
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  30.  11
    Laxmikanta Padhi (2008). Environmental Holism in Hinduism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 23:115-121.
    Holism in environmental ethics is concerned with a harmonious relationship between man and nature. Hinduism seeks to identify and evaluate the distinctive ecological attitudes, values and practices of human beings by making clear their relations with the intellectual and ethical thought within scripture, ritual, myth,symbols, cosmology, and sacrament. In Hinduism the relation between man and nature is like the relationship between the microcosm (Pindānda) and the macrocosm (Brahmānda). The Panċamahābhuta in the Hindu tradition emphasizes that God is assigned to every (...)
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  31.  36
    Elizabeth Burns (2009). Must Theists Believe in a Personal God? Think 8 (23):77-86.
    The claim that God is a person or personal is, perhaps, one of the most fundamental claims which religious believers make about God. In Hinduism, Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva are represented in person-like form. In the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament God walks in the Garden of Eden , experiences emotions , and converses with human beings . In the New Testament, God communicates with his people, usually by means of angels or visions , and retains the ability to speak audibly, as (...)
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  32.  15
    Bruce R. Reichenbach (1989). Karma, Causation, and Divine Intervention. Philosophy East and West 39 (2):135-149.
    I explore various ways in which the karma we create is believed to affect our environment, which in turn is instrumental in rewarding or punishing us according to our just deserts. I argue that the problem of explaining naturalistically the causal operation of the law of karma and of accounting for the precise moral calculation it requires point to the necessity of a theistic administrator. But this option faces a serious dilemma when attempting to specify the relation of God to (...)
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  33. Måns Broo (2003). As Good as God: The Guru in Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇavism. Åbo Akademi University Press.
     
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  34. Maharaj[from old catalog] Nishkinchana (1963). Path to God Realisation. Madras, Sree Gaudiya Math.
     
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  35. Osho (1978). Dance Your Way to God: A Darshan Diary. Rajneesh Foundation.
     
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  36. Yatiswarananda (2009). How to Seek God. Sri Ramakrishna Math.
     
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  37.  2
    A. R. Singh & S. A. Singh (2004). Gandhi on Religion, Faith and Conversion-Secular Blueprint Relevant Today. Mens Sana Monographs 2 (1):79.
    Gandhi believed in judging people of other faiths from their stand point rather than his own. He welcomed contact of Hinduism with other religions, especially the Christian doctrines, for he did not want to be debarred from assimilating good anywhere else. He believed a respectful study of other's religion was a sacred duty and it did not reduce reverence for one's own. He was looking out for those universal principles which transcended religion as a dogma. He expected religion to take (...)
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  38. William Sturman Sax (ed.) (1995). The Gods at Play: Līlā in South Asia. Oxford University Press.
    God is playful. Like a child building sand castles on the beach, God creates the world and destroys it again. God plays with his (or her) devotees, sometimes like a lover, sometimes like a mother with her children, sometimes like an actor in a play. The idea of God's playfulness has been elaborated in Hinduism more, perhaps, than any other religion, providing one of the most distinctive and charming aspects of Indian religious life. Lila or "divine play" can refer to (...)
     
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  39.  11
    P. Copan & C. Meister (eds.) (2007). The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Religion. Routledge.
    The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Religion is an indispensable guide and reference source to the major themes, movements, debates and topics in philosophy of religion. A team of renowned international contributors provide sixty-five accessible entries organised into nine clear parts: philosophical issues in world religions key figures in philosophy of religion religious diversity the theistic conception of God arguments for the existence of God arguments against the existence of God philosophical theology Christian theism recent topics in philosophy of religion. (...)
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  40.  49
    Ray Billington (1997). Understanding Eastern Philosophy. Routledge.
    Ray Billington explores the spirituality of Eastern thought and its differences from and relationships with the Western religious tradition by presenting the main principles of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Jainism and Confucianism. Billington discusses the central themes of religious philosophy, comparing Eastern and Western views of belief of God, the soul, moral decision-making, nature, faith and authority. He then challenges theism, particularly Christianity, with its belief in a personal God bestowing a certain version of "truth". He concludes that the universal mysticism (...)
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  41.  52
    C. J. Arthur (1986). Ineffability and Intelligibility: Towards an Understanding of the Radical Unlikeness of Religious Experience. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 20 (2/3):109 - 129.
    I do not for a moment question the fact that many people have experiences of a special type which may be termed “religious”, The extent to which religious experience may be regarded as a reasonably common phenomenon in present-day Britain is shown clearly by David Hay in his Exploring Inner Space, Harmondsworth 1982. that such experiences often involve reference to something which appears to display a radical unlikeness to all else and that they are therefore in some sense inexpressible. Doubtless (...)
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  42.  24
    Irina Kuznetsova (2012). Utpaladeva's Conception of Self in the Context of the Ātmavāda-Anātmavāda Debate and in Comparison with Western Theological Idealism. Philosophy East and West 62 (3):339-358.
    This essay examines the unique conception of self (atman) developed by Utpaladeva, one of the greatest philosophers of the Kashmir Saiva Recognition (Pratyabhijña) school, in polemics with Buddhist no-self theorists and rival Hindu schools. The central question that fueled philosophical debate between Hinduism and Buddhism for centuries is whether a continuous stable entity, which is either consciousness itself or serves as the ground of consciousness, is required to sustain all the experienced features of embodied physical and mental activity, and, in (...)
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  43.  10
    Sung-Soo Kim (2008). Ham Sok-Hon (1901-1989). Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:359-368.
    This paper explores Ham's role as a maverick thinker, a pacifist and an innovator of religious pluralism in twentieth century Korea. Ham saw an individual's spiritual quest and the struggle for social justice as interrelated. As an idealist, Ham viewed human beings basically as moral beings, and perceived the Supreme Being or God not only as a transcendental being, but also as an imminent being both in the sense of existing everywhere and also in the sense of existing as `inner (...)
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  44. Thomas Oord (ed.) (2007). The Altruism Reader: Selections From Writings on Love, Religion, and Science. Templeton Press.
    This anthology brings together for the first time leading essays and book chapters from theologians, philosophers, and scientists on their research relating to ethics, altruism, and love. Because the general consensus today is that scholarship in moral theory requires empirical research, the arguments of the leading scholars presented in this book will be particularly important to those examining issues in love, ethics, religion, and science. The first half of _The Altruism Reader_ offers key selections from religious texts, leading contemporary scholars, (...)
     
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  45.  10
    Pardeep Kumar (2008). Religious Universalism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:171-176.
    Swami Vivekananda formulated religious universalism for solving various issues of society. Religion, for him was realization. He gave a wide definition of religion in the form of humanism. Religion does not just teach man to refrain from evils but it is doing well for others. If religion is understood in correct sense, much of our social evils in the society would be solved. It did not consist of doctrines or dogmas. For him being religious did not mean being Hindu, Christian, (...)
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  46.  24
    Ankur Barua (2012). Myth as Metaphysics: The Christian Saviour and the Hindu Gods. [REVIEW] Sophia 51 (3):379-393.
    A distinction which is often rehearsed in some strands of Christian writing on the ‘Eastern’ religions, especially Hinduism, is that while they are full of ‘mythological’ fancies, Biblical faith is based on the solid rock of ‘historical’ truth. I argue that the sharp contours of this antithesis are softened when we consider two issues regarding the relation between ‘myth’ and ‘history’. First, the decades–long attempts to separate the ‘historical’ facts about Jesus Christ from the interpretive elements in the Biblical narrative (...)
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  47.  25
    C. K. Raju (2003). The Eleven Pictures of Time: The Physics, Philosophy, and Politics of Time Beliefs. Sage Publications.
    Visit the author's Web site at www.11PicsOfTime.com Time is a mystery that has perplexed humankind since time immemorial. Resolving this mystery is of significance not only to philosophers and physicists but is also a very practical concern. Our perception of time shapes our values and way of life; it also mediates the interaction between science and religion both of which rest fundamentally on assumptions about the nature of time. C K Raju begins with a critical exposition of various time-beliefs, ranging (...)
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  48.  12
    Nathan McGovern (2012). Brahmā: An Early and Ultimately Doomed Attempt at a Brahmanical Synthesis. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (1):1-23.
    In this paper, I argue that, by comparing certain passages from the early Buddhist sūtras and the Mahābhārata , we can find evidence of a late- to post-Vedic “Brahmanical synthesis,” centered on the conception of Brahmā as both supreme Creator God and ultimate goal for transcending saṃsāra , that for the most part did not become a part of the Brahmanical synthesis or syntheses that came to constitute classical Hinduism. By comparing the Buddhist response to this early conception of Brahmā (...)
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  49.  1
    Terry O'Keeffe (1996). Religion and Pluralism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 40:61-72.
    The fact of a religiously plural world is one that is readily acknowledged by believers and non-believers alike. For religious believers, however, this fact poses a set of problems. Religions, at least most of the world's great religions, seem to present conflicting visions of the truth and competing accounts of the way to salvation. Faced with differing accounts of God in Judaism, Buddhism, Islam or Hinduism, what, for example can the Christian claim for the truth of Christian beliefs about God? (...)
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  50.  4
    Francis X. Clooney (1995). Back to the Basics: Reflections on Moral Discourse in a Contemporary Hindu Community. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (4):439-457.
    Instead of searching through Hindu sources for appropriate insights into the questions related to "playing God" in biomedicine, the author seeks rather to understand why some Hindus at least are not inclined to ask such questions. Using examples from the r vai ava sect of south India, the author shows how r vai ava Hindus focus primarily on character formation and the practice of the virtues encoded in the classical texts, thereafter leaving it to the individual to "act as he (...)
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