Search results for 'God (Islam' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Karen Armstrong (1993/2004). A History of God: The 4000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Gramercy Books.
    Over 700,000 copies of the original hardcover and paperback editions of this stunningly popular book have been sold. Karen Armstrong's superbly readable exploration of how the three dominant monotheistic religions of the world—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—have shaped and altered the conception of God is a tour de force. One of Britain's foremost commentators on religious affairs, Armstrong traces the history of how men and women have perceived and experienced God, from the time of Abraham to the present. From classical philosophy (...)
     
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  2.  22
    Irene Oh (2007). The Rights of God: Islam, Human Rights, and Comparative Ethics. Georgetown University Press.
    Their treatment of such human rights political participation, freedom of conscience, and religious toleration demonstrate, Oh says, that Islam should have a ...
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  3. Patricia Crone (2004). God's Rule - Government and Islam: Six Centuries of Medieval Islamic Political Thought. Columbia University Press.
    Patricia Crone's _God's Rule_ is a fundamental reconstruction and analysis of Islamic political thought focusing on its intellectual development during the six centuries from the rise of Islam to the Mongol invasions. Based on a wide variety of primary sources--including some not previously considered from the point of view of political thought--this is the first book to examine the medieval Muslim answers to questions crucial to any Western understanding of Middle Eastern politics today, such as why states are necessary, what (...)
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  4. Patricia Crone (2005). God's Rule - Government and Islam: Six Centuries of Medieval Islamic Political Thought. Cup.
    Patricia Crone's _God's Rule_ is a fundamental reconstruction and analysis of Islamic political thought focusing on its intellectual development during the six centuries from the rise of Islam to the Mongol invasions. Based on a wide variety of primary sources -- including some not previously considered from the point of view of political thought -- this is the first book to examine the medieval Muslim answers to questions crucial to any Western understanding of Middle Eastern politics today, such as why (...)
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  5.  21
    John Walbridge (2010). God and Logic in Islam: The Caliphate of Reason. Cambridge University Press.
    This book investigates the central role of reason in Islamic intellectual life. Despite widespread characterization of Islam as a system of belief based only on revelation, John Walbridge argues that rational methods, not fundamentalism, have characterized Islamic law, philosophy and education since the medieval period. His research demonstrates that this medieval Islamic rational tradition was opposed by both modernists and fundamentalists, resulting in a general collapse of traditional Islamic intellectual life and its replacement by more modern but far shallower forms (...)
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  6. Khaled Abou El Fadl (2002). Reasoning with God: Rationality and Thought in Islam. Oneworld.
     
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  7.  5
    ʻAbd Allāh Ibn ʻUmar Bayḍāwī (2001). Nature, Man and God in Medieval Islam: ʻabd Allah Baydawi's Text, Tawaliʻ Al-Anwar Min Mataliʻ Al-Anzar, Along with Mahmud Isfahani's Commentary, Mataliʻ Al-Anzar, Sharh Tawaliʻ Al-Anwar. Brill Academic Pub.
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  8. Mona Siddiqui (2015). Hospitality and Islam: Welcoming in God's Name. Yale University Press.
    Considering its prominent role in many faith traditions, surprisingly little has been written about hospitality within the context of religion, particularly Islam. In her new book, Mona Siddiqui, a well-known media commentator, makes the first major contribution to the understanding of hospitality both within Islam and beyond. She explores and compares teachings within the various Muslim traditions over the centuries, while also drawing on materials as diverse as Islamic belles lettres, Christian reflections on almsgiving and charity, and Islamic and Western (...)
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  9.  91
    Stanley H. Skreslet (forthcoming). Book Review: God of Battles: Holy Wars of Christianity and Islam, by Peter Partner. Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1998. 391pp. $16.95. ISBN 0-691-00235-5; The Holy War Idea in Western and Islamic Traditions, by James Turner Johnson. Pennsylvania State University Press, University Park, 1997. 194 Pp. $16.95. ISBN 0-271-01633-7. [REVIEW] Interpretation 53 (4):416-418.
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  10.  2
    Zaheer Kazmi (2015). Automatic Islam: Divine Anarchy and the Machines of God. Modern Intellectual History 12 (1):33-64.
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  11.  1
    Asma Afsaruddin (2006). Patricia Crone, God's Rule: Government and Islam. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004. Pp. X, 462; 11 Charts. $39.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (4):1176-1178.
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  12. Macksood Aftab (2013). John Walbridge, God and Logic in Islam: The Caliphate of Reason. Journal of Islamic Philosophy 9:116-117.
  13. Luigi Bradizza (2014). God and Logic in Islam: The Caliphate of Reason. The European Legacy 19 (5):643-644.
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  14. Edwin Calverley & James Pollock (eds.) (2001). Nature, Man and God in Medieval Islam. Brill.
    In terms of the Science of Theological Statement [Kalam] Abd Allah Baydawi concisely outlines perceived Islamic reality - in its modes of the naturally Possible, the apodictically Divine, and the humanly heroic Prophetic - as the process of perfecting man's spiritual structure.
     
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  15. Aasim Padela (2014). Our Bodies Belong to God: Organ Transplants, Islam, and the Struggle for Human Dignity in Egypt By Sherine Hamdy. [REVIEW] Journal of Islamic Studies 25 (1):98-103.
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  16. F. Peters (1994). Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The Classical Texts and their Interpretation. Vol. 1 : From Covenant to Community ; Vol. 2 : The Word and the Law and the People of God \ Vol. 3 : The Works of the Spirit. [REVIEW] Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 56 (1):173-173.
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  17. Jonathan Riley-Smith (2000). Peter Partner, God of Battles: Holy Wars of Christianity and Islam. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1998. Paper. Pp. Xxvii, 364 Plus Black-and-White Illustrations; Maps. $16.95. First Published in 1997 by HarperCollins in London. [REVIEW] Speculum 75 (3):719-721.
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  18.  28
    Maha Elkaisy-Friemuth (2006). God and Humans in Islamic Thought: Abd Al-Jabbar, Ibn Sina and Al-Ghazali. Routledge.
    The explanation of the relationship between God and humans, as portrayed in Islam, is often influenced by the images of God and of human beings which theologians, philosophers and mystics have in mind. The early period of Islam disclose a diversity of interpretations of this relationship. Thinkers from the tenth and eleventh century had the privilege of disclosing different facets of the relationship between humans and the divine. God and Humans in Islamic Thought discusses the view of three different scholars (...)
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  19.  2
    Wilson Muoha Maina (2015). Understanding Social Order in the Religion of Islam: A Comparative Analysis. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 14 (40):170-185.
    Despite the fact that many of us live in secular societies, religions are also a factor in our daily lives. New information technologies and highly efficient modes of transportation have made it possible for people from various continents to encounter each other. People of different religions and ethnicities have become neighbors in our cities. Religious dialogue is more necessary in our contemporary world than it has ever been in history. This essay analyzes how the Islamic faith shapes the believers worldview (...)
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  20.  20
    Herbert A. Davidson (1987). Proofs for Eternity, Creation, and the Existence of God in Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The central debate of natural theology among medieval Muslims and Jews concerned whether or not the world was eternal. Opinions divided sharply on this issue because the outcome bore directly on God's relationship with the world: eternity implies a deity bereft of will, while a world with a beginning leads to the contrasting picture of a deity possessed of will. In this exhaustive study of medieval Islamic and Jewish arguments for eternity, creation, and the existence of God, Herbert Davidson (...)
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  21. Muhammad Iqbal Afaqi (2011). Knowledge of God: A Comparative Study of Christian and Islamic Epistemologies. National Book Foundation.
  22. Tariq Mustafa (2009). The Case for God: Based on Reason and Evidence, Not Groundless Faith: A Collection of Writings. Mr. Books.
     
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  23.  17
    Willem B. Drees (2013). Islam and Bioethics in the Context of “Religion and Science”. Zygon 48 (3):732-744.
    This paper places “Islam and bioethics” within the framework of “religion and science” discourse. It thus may be seen as a complement to the paper by Henk ten Have () with which this thematic section in Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science opens, which places “Islam and bioethics” in the context of contemporary bioethics. It turns out that in Zygon there have been more submitted articles on Islam and bioethics than on any other Islam-related topic. This may be a consequence (...)
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  24.  12
    Qaiser Shahzad (2007). Playing God and the Ethics of Divine Names: An Islamic Paradigm for Biomedical Ethics. Bioethics 21 (8):413–418.
  25.  12
    Desh Raj Sirswal, Philosophy of Sufism and Islam.
    In the course of human history, man is struck by a strange phenomenon. The living beings are born, they grow for some time and then they died. Death is perhaps the strongest, and still the common most phenomenon man has to come across. He has also tried to explain the phenomenon in his own way. One such explanation is that although the living beings (particularly human being) looks as one it (or he) consists of two elements, the material body (...)
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  26. Andrew Chignell & Dean Zimmerman (2012). Review: Saving God From Saving God. [REVIEW] Books and Culture 15 (3).
    Mark Johnston’s book, Saving God (Princeton University Press, 2010) has two main goals, one negative and the other positive: (1) to eliminate the gods of the major Western monotheisms (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) as candidates for the role of “the Highest One”; (2) to introduce the real Highest One, a panentheistic deity worthy of devotion and capable of extending to us the grace needed to transform us from inwardly-turned sinners to practitioners of agape. In this review, we argue that Johnston’s (...)
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  27.  25
    Ian Richard Netton (1989). Allāh Transcendent: Studies in the Structure and Semiotics of Islamic Philosophy, Theology, and Cosmology. Routledge.
    Introduction THE FACES OF GOD How many faces has God? Egyptologists have wrestled with the problem over many years ...
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  28.  38
    Sohail H. Hashmi (2010). The Rights of Muslim Women: A Comment on Irene Oh's the Rights of God. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):588-593.
    This review of Irene Oh's The Rights of God focuses on women's rights in Islamic theory and practice. Oh suggests that religious establishments, and the texts they disseminate, often press believers to recognize and reject social problems, such as racial and gender discrimination. Islamic scholars and texts have played a more ambiguous role in efforts to recognize women's rights within Muslim states. Modernist intellectuals have used Islamic texts to support the advancement of women's rights, but members of the more conservative (...)
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  29.  33
    ‘abd Carney (2008). Twilight of the Idols? Pluralism and Mystical Praxis in Islam. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 64 (1):1 - 20.
    In this article, we discuss the current trend of authoritarianism in the Islamic world, especially as embodied in the institution of taqlid, whereby a lay person blindly follows a religious scholar. We will compare this to the mystical tradition of Ibn 'Arabî as well as the early esoteric Shî'ite tradition, where a much more "rebellious" type of Islam was offered and provided purviews of pluralism and universalism that challenge authoritarian closures of interpretation in relationship with God. By way of further (...)
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  30.  10
    John Herlihy (2004). Near and Distant Horizons: In Search of the Primary Sources of Knowledge. Sophia Perennis.
    pt. A. The supreme mind of God -- First origin and final source -- The knowledge of a true beginning -- The mystic pen and the guarded tablet -- pt. B. The universal body of God -- Man against the last horizons -- Inside the world of nature -- Reading the messages of natural symbols -- pt. C The human image of God -- The symbolic image of man -- Man's true nature -- Behind the face of man.
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  31. Muhammad Iqbal (1944). The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam. [Lahore?]Javid Iqbal; Can Be Had of Shaikh Muhammad Ashraf, Lahore.
    _The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam_ is Muhammad Iqbal's major philosophic work: a series of profound reflections on the perennial conflict among science, religion, and philosophy, culminating in new visions of the unity of human knowledge, of the human spirit, and of God. Iqbal's thought contributed significantly to the establishment of Pakistan, to the religious and political ideals of the Iranian Revolution, and to the survival of Muslim identity in parts of the former USSR. It now serves as new (...)
     
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  32. Sayyid Quṭb (2006). Basic Principles of the Islamic Worldview. Islamic Publications International.
  33. Muḥammad Ḥusayn Ṭabāṭabāʼī (2003). The Elements of Islamic Metaphysics: (Bidāyat Al-Ḥikmah). Icas.
    The Elements of Islamic Metaphysics signals a new approach to the teaching of Islamic philosophy. It provides a useful overview of 20th century philosophy in Iran, and traces the development of philosophical thought in the context of a religious tradition whose intellectual character was determined to a large extent by the contents of the Qur’anic revelation and the prophetic teachings. At the same time it attempts to demonstrate how philosophical thought is by nature independent of religious doctrine and differs from (...)
     
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  34. Ṭabāṭabāʼ & Muḥammad Ḥusayn ī (2003). The Elements of Islamic Metaphysics: (Bidāyat Al-Ḥikmah). Icas.
    The Elements of Islamic Metaphysics signals a new approach to the teaching of Islamic philosophy. It provides a useful overview of 20th century philosophy in Iran, and traces the development of philosophical thought in the context of a religious tradition whose intellectual character was determined to a large extent by the contents of the Qur’anic revelation and the prophetic teachings. At the same time it attempts to demonstrate how philosophical thought is by nature independent of religious doctrine and differs from (...)
     
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  35. Souran Mardini (2014). The Reference-Referent. Murat Center.
     
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  36. Martin Tamcke (ed.) (2008). Christliche Gotteslehre Im Orient Seit Dem Aufkommen des Islams Bis Zur Gegenwart. Ergon in Kommission.
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  37. Sayyid Nāṣir Zaīdī (2006). Dalāʼil-I Vujūd-I Bārī Taʻālaʹ: Mullah Sadrā Shīrazī Kī Naẓar Men̲. Al-Baṣīra.
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  38. Abūlkalām Āzād (1970). Islamic Conception of Love and Goodness. Peermahomed Ebrahim Trust.
  39.  53
    Daniel Howard-Snyder (forthcoming). Panmetaphoricism. Religious Studies:1-25.
    Panmetaphoricism is the view that our speech about God can only be metaphorical. In this essay, I do not assess the reasons that have been given for the view. Rather, I assess the view itself. My aim is to develop the most plausible version of panmetaphoricism in order to gain a clear view of the God it offers for our consideration.
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  40. David Bentley Hart (2013). The Experience of God: Being, Consciousness, Bliss. Yale University Press.
    Despite the recent ferocious public debate about belief, the concept most central to the discussion—God—frequently remains vaguely and obscurely described. Are those engaged in these arguments even talking about the same thing? In a wide-ranging response to this confusion, esteemed scholar David Bentley Hart pursues a clarification of how the word “God” functions in the world’s great theistic faiths. Ranging broadly across Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Vedantic and Bhaktic Hinduism, Sikhism, and Buddhism, Hart explores how these great intellectual traditions treat humanity’s (...)
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  41. Peter Simons, Why God Does Not Exist.
    Before arguing for the nonexistence of God let me say what kind of God I am denying. It is a God as broadly conceived in the Mosaic monotheistic tradition of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, as supreme being. This God has two chief characteristics: supreme power and supreme goodness. As powerful, God is the agency responsible for creating and/or sustaining the world. As good, God is the source and supreme exemplar of positive value or goodness. It follows that as a good (...)
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  42.  12
    John Kelsay (2005). Democratic Virtue, Comparative Ethics, and Contemporary Islam. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (4):697-707.
    This essay illustrates the kind of moral analysis Jeffrey Stout advocates in "Democracy and Tradition" by way of examining a conversation among Muslims that took place between June and December 2002. Their debate centers on al-Qaìda's legitimacy as God's chosen defender of Islam, which is called into question due to the tension between al-Qaìda's military tactics and the concepts of honorable combat held within the Islamic tradition. This giving and taking of reasons in both defense and detraction of al-Qaìda's tactics (...)
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  43.  11
    Gholamhossein Tavakoli (2008). Knowing God Via Negativa. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:263-274.
    Some of the most well known figures in three main cultures, Islam, Christianity and Judaism, defend negative theology. They believe that God doesn’t have any positive attribute and that no positive knowledge of Him is possible. Others, who are in majority, are anxious of agnosticism. Maimonides the great Jewish philosopher tries to relive this anxiety. He proposes negative knowledge arguing that in terms of negation we become closer to some knowledge of Him, though His nature still remains out of access. (...)
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  44.  5
    Ziauddin Sardar (2008). The Erasure of Islam. The Philosophers' Magazine 42:77-79.
    One cannot have a revolt on behalf of reason in Islam because reason is central to its worldview: reason is the other side of revelation and the Qur’an presents both as “signs of God”. A Muslim society cannot function without either.
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  45.  17
    Meg Wallace (2013). Freedom of Speech, Multiculturalism and Islam: Yes We 'Can' Talk About This. The Australian Humanist 109 (109):16.
    Wallace, Meg London's National Theatre recently hosted a debate about freedom of speech, multiculturalism and Islam called Can we talk about this? The opening line was a question to the audience, 'Are you morally superior to the Taliban?' Anne Marie Waters, who was present, wrote in her blog that 'very few people in the audience raised their hand to say they were.' This response demonstrates a misconceived attempt to be seen as tolerant and 'multiculturalist'. People could not bring themselves to (...)
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  46.  23
    Tomis Kapitan, Reason and Flexibility in Islam.
    The role of reason, and its embodiment in philosophical-scientific theorizing, is always a troubling one for religious traditions. The deep emotional needs that religion strives to satisfy seem ever linked to an attitudes of acceptance, belief, or trust, yet, in its theoretical employment, reason functions as a critic as much as it does a creator, and in the special fields of metaphysics and epistemology its critical arrows are sometimes aimed at long-standing cherished beliefs. Understandably, the mere approach to these beliefs (...)
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  47.  5
    Amani Fairak & X. Dai Rao (2005). Universal Practices Across Religions: Ecological Perspectives of Islam. Dialogue and Universalism 15 (7-8):65-72.
    This paper discusses diverse practices across religions from a universalistic view. Various religions define their beliefs and rituals within an ecological context. Whether it is an Abrahamic, African or humanistic religion, they all have one ritual ground to facilitate their beliefs on. This ground takes the form of environmental or earth-based practices. Religious initiations and the history of spiritual leaders have illustrated that human spirituality is connected to nature and Mother Earth. In addition, Islam views contemplation about natural wonders as (...)
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  48.  15
    L. E. Goodman (1992). Time in Islam. Asian Philosophy 2 (1):3 – 19.
    Abstract Islam displaces the ancient idea of time as an implacable enemy with the scriptural image of time as the stage of judgment, a narrow bridge of accountability stretched between creation and eternity. The stark contrast of temporal evanescence with all the immutability of eternity challenges Muslim theologians and philosophers of the classic age. The dialectical theologians of the kalam describe time and change atomisti?cally and even occasionalistically, seeking to preserve the absoluteness of the contrast and to avoid compromising the (...)
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  49.  4
    Don Waisanen, Hershey H. Friedman & Linda Weiser Friedman (2015). What’s So Funny About Arguing with God? A Case for Playful Argumentation From Jewish Literature. Argumentation 29 (1):57-80.
    In this paper, we show that God is portrayed in the Hebrew Bible and in the Rabbinic literature—some of the very Hebrew texts that have influenced the three major world religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—as One who can be argued with and even changes his mind. Contrary to fundamentalist positions, in the Hebrew Bible and other Jewish texts God is omniscient but enjoys good, playful argumentation, broadening the possibilities for reasoning and reasonability. Arguing with God has also had a (...)
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  50.  4
    Sophia Menache (1997). Dogs: God's Worst Enemies? Society and Animals 5 (1):23-44.
    In a broad survey of negative and hostile attitudes toward canines in pagan, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim traditions, the author posits that warm ties between humans and canines have been seen as a threat to the authority of the clergy and indeed, of God. Exploring ancient myth, Biblical and Rabbinical literature, and early and medieval Christianity and Islam, she explores images and prohibitions concerning dogs in the texts of institutionalized, monotheistic religions, and offers possible explanations for these attitudes, including concern (...)
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