Search results for 'God (Judaism History of doctrines' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Karen Armstrong (1993). A History of God: The 4000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Gramercy Books.
    Over 700,000 copies of the original hardcover and paperback editions of this stunningly popular book have been sold. Karen Armstrong's superbly readable exploration of how the three dominant monotheistic religions of the world—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—have shaped and altered the conception of God is a tour de force. One of Britain's foremost commentators on religious affairs, Armstrong traces the history of how men and women have perceived and experienced God, from the time of Abraham to the present. From classical (...)
     
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  2.  9
    Everett Ferguson (ed.) (1951). Doctrines of God and Christ in the Early Church. Garland.
    An integrated overview of history The volume in this series are arranged topically to cover biography, literature, doctrines, practices, institutions, worship, missions, and daily life. Archaeology and art as well as writings are drawn on to illuminate the Christian movement in its early centuries. Ample attention is also given to the relation of Christianity to pagan thought and life, to the Roman state, to Judaism, and to doctrines and practices that came to be judged as heretical or (...)
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  3.  16
    Kenneth Seeskin (1999). Searching for a Distant God: The Legacy of Maimonides. Oxford University Press.
    Monotheism is usually considered Judaism's greatest contribution to world culture, but it is far from clear what monotheism is. This work examines the notion that monotheism is not so much a claim about the number of God as a claim about the nature of God. Seeskin argues that the idea of a God who is separate from his creation and unique is not just an abstraction but a suitable basis for worship. He examines this conclusion in the contexts of prayer, (...)
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  4.  16
    Lenn Evan Goodman (1996). God of Abraham. Oxford University Press.
    This cogently argued and richly illustrated book rejects the dichotomy between the God of Abraham and the God of the philosophers to argue that the two are one. In God of Abraham, one of our leading philosophers of religion shows how human values can illuminate our idea of God and how the monotheistic idea of God in turn illuminates our moral, social, cultural, aesthetic, and even ritual understanding. Throughout Goodman draws on a wealth of traditional, philosophical, historical, and anthropological materials, (...)
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  5.  32
    Herbert A. Davidson (1987). Proofs for Eternity, Creation, and the Existence of God in Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The central debate of natural theology among medieval Muslims and Jews concerned whether or not the world was eternal. Opinions divided sharply on this issue because the outcome bore directly on God's relationship with the world: eternity implies a deity bereft of will, while a world with a beginning leads to the contrasting picture of a deity possessed of will. In this exhaustive study of medieval Islamic and Jewish arguments for eternity, creation, and the existence of God, Herbert Davidson provides (...)
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  6.  16
    Michael Wyschogrod (1983). The Body of Faith: God and the People of Israel. Jason Aronson.
    The original edition of this book describes it as an attempt to develop a comprehensive understanding of traditional Judaism in conversation with contemporary ...
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  7. Michael Wyschogrod (1983). The Body of Faith: Judaism as Corporeal Election. Seabury Press.
     
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  8.  26
    Richard Mason (1997). The God of Spinoza: A Philosophical Study. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the fullest study in English for many years on the role of God in Spinoza's philosophy. Spinoza has been called both a 'God-intoxicated man' and an atheist, both a pioneer of secular Judaism and a bitter critic of religion. He was born a Jew but chose to live outside any religious community. He was deeply engaged both in traditional Hebrew learning and in contemporary physical science. He identified God with nature or substance: a theme which runs through (...)
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  9. Warren Harvey (1998). Physics and Metaphysics in Ḥasdai Crescas. J.C. Gieben.
  10. Yakir Shoshani (2005). Be-Ḳesher le-Elohim. Miśrad Ha-Biṭaḥon.
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  11.  6
    Oliver Leaman (2006). Jewish Thought: An Introduction. Routledge.
    This is a fresh and contemporary introduction to the Jewish faith, its philosophies and worldviews. Written by a leading figure in the field, it explores debates which have preoccupied Jewish thinkers over the centuries and examines their continuing influence in contemporary Judaism. Jewish Thought surveys the central controversies in Judaism, including the protracted arguments within the religion itself. Topics range from the relations between Judaism and other religions, such as Islam and Christianity, to contemporary issues such as sex and gender (...)
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  12. M. J. Edwards (2013). Image, Word, and God in the Early Christian Centuries. Ashgate Pub. Ltd..
    Seeing and hearing God in the Old Testament -- Seeing and hearing God in the New Testament -- Word and image in classical Greek philosophy -- Philosophers and sophists of the early Roman era -- Image, text and incarnation in the second century -- Image, text and incarnation in the third century -- Neoplatonism and the arts -- Image, text and incarnation in the fourth century -- Myth and text in proclus -- Christianity of Christian Platonism.
     
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    David Hartman (2011). The God Who Hates Lies: Confronting and Rethinking Jewish Tradition. Jewish Lights Pub..
    Introduction: what planet are you from? A yeshiva boy's pilgrimage into philosophy, history, and reality -- 1. Halakhic spirituality: living in the presence of God -- 2. Toward a God-intoxicated halakha -- 3. Feminism and apologetics: lying in the presence of God -- 4. Biology or covenant? Conversion and the corrupting influence of gentile seed -- 5. Where did modern orthodoxy go wrong? The mistaken halakhic presumptions of Rabbi Soloveitchik -- 6. The God who hates lies: choosing life in (...)
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  14.  17
    Oliver Leaman (1995). Evil and Suffering in Jewish Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The problems of evil and suffering have been extensively discussed in Jewish philosophy, and much of the discussion has centred on the Book of Job. In this study Oliver Leaman poses two questions: how can a powerful and caring deity allow terrible things to happen to obviously innocent people, and why have the Jewish people been so harshly treated throughout history, given their status as the chosen people? He explores these issues through an analysis of the views of Philo, (...)
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