Search results for 'God Bibliography' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    Donald A. Cress (1976). Toward a Bibliography on Duns Scotus on the Existence of God. Franciscan Studies 35 (1):45-65.
  2.  1
    Mary Beth Ingham (2015). Journey Back to God: Origen on the Problem of Evil. By Mark S. M. Scott. Pp. Xiv, 166, Notes, Bibliography, Oxford University Press, 2012, £45.96. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 56 (1):145-145.
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  3.  7
    D. W. Hamlyn (1966). Scepticism, Man, and God. Selections From the Major Writings of Sextus Empiricus. Edited with Introduction, Notes and Bibliography by Philip P. Hallie; Translation by Sanford G. Etheridge. (Middletown, Connecticut: Wesleyan University Press, 1964. Pp. Xi + 236. Price $8.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 41 (155):89-.
  4.  58
    Graham Robert Oppy (1995). Ontological Arguments and Belief in God. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a unique contribution to the philosophy of religion. It offers a comprehensive discussion of one of the most famous arguments for the existence of God: the ontological argument. The author provides and analyses a critical taxonomy of those versions of the argument that have been advanced in recent philosophical literature, as well as of those historically important versions found in the work of St Anselm, Descartes, Leibniz, Hegel and others. A central thesis of the book is that (...)
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  5.  34
    Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (ed.) (2007). Lectures on the Proofs of the Existence of God. Oxford University Press.
    The Hegel Lectures Series Series Editor: Peter C. Hodgson Hegel's lectures have had as great a historical impact as the works he himself published. Important elements of his system are elaborated only in the lectures, especially those given in Berlin during the last decade of his life. The original editors conflated materials from different sources and dates, obscuring the development and logic of Hegel's thought. The Hegel Lectures series is based on a selection of extant and recently discovered transcripts and (...)
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  6.  47
    Kelly James Clark (2010). Explaining God Away? In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell 514--526.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * The Cognitive Psychology of Religion * Evolutionary Explanations of Religious Belief * Explaining God Away * Critique * Conclusion * Notes * Bibliography.
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  7.  45
    Kelly James Clark (2010). How Real People Believe: Reason and Belief in God. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell 479--499.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * Introduction * The Demand for Evidence * Belief Begins with Trust * Reid on Human Cognitive Faculties * Reid and Rationality * The God Faculty * Reason and Belief in God * Conclusion * Notes * Bibliography.
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  8.  6
    Christopher Southgate (1999). God, Humanity and the Cosmos. Http://Www.Meta-Library.Net/Ghc/Index-Frame.Html.
    This fully revised and updated edition of God, Humanity and the Cosmos is an essential companion to the field, with exercises for the student, a comprehensive bibliography, and suggestions for further reading.
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  9. Robert G. Wolf (1998). Analytic Philosophy of Religion a Bibliography, 1940-1996. Philosophy Documentation Center, Bowling Green State University.
    This bibliography covers writers in both the ordinary language and formal language wings of 20th-century analytic philosophy from 1940 to 1996. A wide range of topics is covered, from the nature of religion as a human activity to various doctrines about the nature of God. More than 5,000 items are listed, with many of them cross-indexed.The bibliography is topically organized into sixteen main categories, with approximately 80 subject headings used to further organize the material. An author index completes (...)
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  10.  13
    T. L. Miethe (1977). The Ontological Argument: A Research Bibliography. Modern Schoolman 54 (2):148-166.
    Within the past two decades or so there has been a gradual renewal of interest in metaphysics in general and in the theistic arguments in particular. "the ontological argument: a research bibliography," is the most comprehensive bibliography ever done on this argument for god's existence, with over 330 items listed. the article is divided into the following categories: general histories of the argument; the argument in anselm; in the middle ages after anselm; from descartes to kant; in continental (...)
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  11. Peter C. Hodgson (2007). Hegel: Lectures on the Proofs of the Existence of God. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Hegel Lectures SeriesSeries Editor: Peter C. Hodgson Hegel's lectures have had as great a historical impact as the works he himself published. Important elements of his system are elaborated only in the lectures, especially those given in Berlin during the last decade of his life. The original editors conflated materials from different sources and dates, obscuring the development and logic of Hegel's thought. The Hegel Lectures series is based on a selection of extant and recently discovered transcripts and manuscripts. (...)
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  12. Peter C. Hodgson (ed.) (2011). Hegel: Lectures on the Proofs of the Existence of God. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Hegel Lectures SeriesSeries Editor: Peter C. Hodgson Hegel's lectures have had as great a historical impact as the works he himself published. Important elements of his system are elaborated only in the lectures, especially those given in Berlin during the last decade of his life. The original editors conflated materials from different sources and dates, obscuring the development and logic of Hegel's thought. The Hegel Lectures series is based on a selection of extant and recently discovered transcripts and manuscripts. (...)
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  13.  2
    Peter C. Hodgson (ed.) (2007). Hegel: Lectures on the Proofs of the Existence of God. OUP Oxford.
    The Hegel Lectures Series Series Editor: Peter C. Hodgson -/- Hegel's lectures have had as great a historical impact as the works he himself published. Important elements of his system are elaborated only in the lectures, especially those given in Berlin during the last decade of his life. The original editors conflated materials from different sources and dates, obscuring the development and logic of Hegel's thought. The Hegel Lectures series is based on a selection of extant and recently discovered transcripts (...)
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  14. Michael Palmer (2001). The Question of God: An Introduction and Sourcebook. Routledge.
    This important textbook introduces the six great arguments for the existence of God, as found in a wealth of primary sources from classic and contemporary texts. It requires no specialist knowledge of philosophy, and is ideally suited to students and teachers at school or university level. Sections include: * The Ontological Argument * The Cosmological Argument * The Argument from Design * The Argument from Miracles * The Moral Argument * The Pragmatic Argument. Additional features include: * revision questions * (...)
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  15.  46
    John F. Haught (2006). God and Evolution. In Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press 697--712.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712270; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 697-712.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 711-712.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  16.  41
    Alan Padgett (2010). God and Time: Relative Timelessness Reconsidered. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell 884--892.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * What is Relative Timelessness? * The Biblical Witness * Problems with Timeless Eternity * Timelessness Sans Creation * Notes * Bibliography.
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  17. Eliyahu White (1999). Talk About God, and Others: (Approaches to Likeness in Certain Western Theological and Philosophical Systems): A Process Metaphysics of Analogy Introduced Historically: (By Way of Regard Especially to Attempted Syntheses of Bible and Hellenism). S.N..
    English text -- Endnotes. Bibliography. Hebrew abstract.
     
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  18.  1
    Kevin J. Vanhoozer (2010). Remythologizing Theology: Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction: what is remythologizing?; Part I. 'God' in Scripture and Theology: 1. Biblical representation (Vorstellung): divine communicative action and passion; 2. Theological conceptualization (Begriff): varieties of theism and panentheism; 3. The new kenotic-perichoretic relational ontotheology: some 'classical' concerns; Part II. Communicative Theism and the Triune God: 4. God's being is in communicating; 5. God in three persons: the one who lights and lives in love; Part III. God and World: Authorial Action and Interaction: 6. Divine (...)
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  19. Peter Anthony Bertocci (1938). Bibliography. In The Empirical Argument for God in Late British Thought. Harvard University Press 289-298.
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  20. Mitchell Cohen (1994). Select Bibliography. In The Wager of Lucien Goldmann: Tragedy, Dialectics, and a Hidden God. Princeton University Press 331-342.
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  21. Paul Weingartner (2014). Bibliography. In Nature's Teleological Order and God's Providence: Are They Compatible with Chance, Free Will, and Evil? De Gruyter 273-282.
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  22. Richard Swinburne (2004). The Existence of God. Oxford University Press.
    Richard Swinburne presents a substantially rewritten and updated edition of his most celebrated book. No other work has made a more powerful case for the probability of the existence of God. Swinburne gives a rigorous and penetrating analysis of the most important arguments for theism: the cosmological argument; arguments from the existence of laws of nature and the 'fine-tuning' of the universe; from the occurrence of consciousness and moral awareness; and from miracles and religious experience. He claims that while none (...)
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  23. William P. Alston (1991). Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience. Cornell University Press.
    Introduction i. Character of the Book The central thesis of this book is that experiential awareness of God, or as I shall be saying, the perception of God, ...
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  24. Courtney Fugate (2014). The Highest Good and Kant's Proof(s) of God's Existence. History of Philosophy Quarterly 31 (2).
    This paper explains a way of understanding Kant's proof of God's existence in the Critique of Practical Reason that has hitherto gone unnoticed and argues that this interpretation possesses several advantages over its rivals. By first looking at examples where Kant indicates the role that faith plays in moral life and then reconstructing the proof of the second Critique with this in view, I argue that, for Kant, we must adopt a certain conception of the highest good, and so also (...)
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  25. Erik Wielenberg (2009). Dawkins's Gambit, Hume's Aroma, and God's Simplicity. Philosophia Christi 11 (1):113-127.
    I examine the central atheistic argument of Richard Dawkins’s book The God Delusion (“Dawkins’s Gambit”) and illustrate its failure. I further show that Dawkins’s Gambit is a fragment of a more comprehensive critique of theism found in David Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. Among the failings of Dawkins’s Gambit is that it is directed against a version of the God Hypothesis that few traditional monotheists hold. Hume’s critique is more challenging in that it targets versions of the God Hypothesis that (...)
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  26.  97
    Gabriel Vacariu, (2015) "God Cannot Even Exist!".
    We have to change our oldest paradigm of thinking about the existence of the “world” and God. In my books and articles, I have showed that the “world”/”universe” does not exist but “epistemologically different worlds” (EDWs) exist/are. Within the EDWs, God cannot exist because of this reason: God cannot exist in all EDWs since one EW does not exist for all EDWs. God cannot be present in all EDWs, therefore, God cannot even exist.
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  27.  68
    Jordan Howard Sobel (2004). Logic and Theism: Arguments for and Against Beliefs in God. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a wide-ranging book about arguments for and against belief in God.
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  28. Vuko Andric & Attila Tanyi (forthcoming). God and Eternal Boredom. Religious Studies:1-20.
    God is thought to be eternal. Does this mean that he is timeless? Or is he, rather, omnitemporal? In this paper we want to show that God cannot be omnitemporal. Our starting point, which we take from Bernard Williams’ article on the Makropulos Case, is the intuition that it is inappropriate for persons not to become bored after a sufficiently long sequence of time has passed. If God were omnitemporal, he would suffer from boredom. But God is the greatest possible (...)
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  29.  54
    David Torrijos-Castrillejo (2015). Feuerbach, Xenophanes and the Too Human God. In Gabriela Blebea Nicolae (ed.), Credința în época secularizării. Editura Arhiepiscopiei Romano-Catolice 179-192.
    Feuerbach is known for his unmasking of the concept of God insofar he solved it in a celestial idealization of the human essence. Xenophanes already rejected the popular idea of the gods, which were described as deified human beings. Our purpose is to compare the process both thinkers followed, because both set the human as the focus of their arguments. Xenophanes’ divinity retained some aspect in common with humans and such a God, despite his diversity from men and his transcendence, (...)
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  30. C. Stephen Evans (2012). Natural Signs and Knowledge of God: A New Look at Theistic Arguments. Oxford University Press.
    Is there such a thing as natural knowledge of God? C. Stephen Evans presents the case for understanding theistic arguments as expressions of natural signs in order to gain a new perspective both on their strengths and weaknesses. Three classical, much-discussed theistic arguments - cosmological, teleological, and moral - are examined for the natural signs they embody. At the heart of this book lie several relatively simple ideas. One is that if there is a God of the kind accepted by (...)
     
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  31.  39
    Brian Leftow (2012). God and Necessity. Oxford University Press.
    Modal basics -- Some solutions -- Theist solutions -- The ontology of possibility -- Modal truthmakers -- Modality and the divine nature -- Deity as essential -- Against deity theories -- The role of deity -- The biggest bang -- Divine concepts -- Concepts, syntax, and actualism -- Modality: basic notions -- The genesis of secular modality -- Modal reality -- Essences -- Non-secular modalities -- Theism and modal semantics -- Freedom, preference, and cost -- Explaining modal status -- Explaining (...)
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  32. Arman Hovhannisyan, God and Reality.
    Metaphysics has done everything to involve God in the world of being. However, in case of considering Reality as being and nothingness, naturally, the metaphysical approach toward the idea of God is losing its grounds. If Reality is being and nothingness, so the idea of God, too, should concern nothingness as well as being.
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  33. Emmanuel Lévinas (1998). Of God Who Comes to Mind. Stanford University Press.
    Emmanuel Levinas is one of the most original philosophers in the twentieth century. In this book, continuing his thought on obligation, he investigates the possibility that the word God can be understood now, at the end of the twentieth century, in a meaningful way. The thirteen essays collected in this volume offer an introduction to the wide range of Levinas's thought, addresses philosophical questions concerning politics, language and religion and the philosophies of, amongst others, Heidegger, Kierkegaard, Marx and Derrida. The (...)
     
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  34. Robert K. Garcia (forthcoming). Tropes as Divine Acts: The Nature of Creaturely Properties in a World Sustained by God. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    I aim to synthesize two issues within theistic metaphysics. The first concerns the metaphysics of creaturely properties and, more specifically, the nature of unshareable properties, or tropes. The second concerns the metaphysics of providence and, more specifically, the way in which God sustains creatures, or sustenance. I propose that creaturely properties, understood as what I call modifier tropes, are identical with divine acts of sustenance, understood as acts of property-conferral. I argue that this *theistic conferralism* is attractive because it integrates (...)
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  35.  11
    Herman Philipse (2012). God in the Age of Science?: A Critique of Religious Reason. OUP Oxford.
    Herman Philipse puts forward a powerful new critique of belief in God. He examines the strategies that have been used for the philosophical defence of religious belief, and by careful reasoning casts doubt on the legitimacy of relying on faith instead of evidence, and on probabilistic arguments for the existence of God.
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  36.  68
    Baruch Spinoza (2000). Ethics. OUP Oxford.
    The Oxford Philosophical Texts series consists of authoritative teaching editions of canonical texts in the history of philosophy from the ancient world down to modern times. Each volume provides a clear, well laid out text together with a comprehensive introduction by a leading specialist, giving the student detailed critical guidance on the intellectual context of the work and the structure and philosophical important of the main arguments and explain unfamiliar references and terminology, and a full bibliography and index are (...)
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  37.  9
    Paul K. Moser (2010). The Evidence for God: Religious Knowledge Reexamined. Cambridge University Press.
    If God exists, where can we find adequate evidence for God's existence? In this book, Paul Moser offers a new perspective on the evidence for God that centers on a morally robust version of theism that is cognitively resilient. The resulting evidence for God is not speculative, abstract, or casual. Rather, it is morally and existentially challenging to humans, as they themselves responsively and willingly become evidence of God's reality in receiving and reflecting God's moral character for others. Moser calls (...)
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  38.  32
    Dani Adams (forthcoming). God and Dispositional Essentialism: An Account of the Laws of Nature. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
    It is common to appeal to governing laws of nature in order to explain the existence of natural regularities. Classical theism, however, maintains the sovereignty thesis: everything distinct from God is created by him and is under his guidance and control. It follows from this that God must somehow be responsible for natural laws and regularities. Therefore, theists need an account of the relation between regularities, laws, and God. I examine competing accounts of laws of nature and conclude that dispositional (...)
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  39. Paul Gould (2012). The Problem of Universals, Realism, and God. Metaphysica 13 (2):183-194.
    There has been much discussion of late on what exactly the Problem of Universals is and is not. Of course answers to these questions and many more like it depend on what is supposed to be explained by a solution to the Problem of Universals. In this paper, I seek to establish two claims: first, that when the facts (explanada) to be explained and the kind of explanation needed are elucidated, it will be shown that the Problem of Universals is (...)
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  40. Guy Kahane (2011). Should We Want God to Exist? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (3):674-696.
    Whether God exists is a metaphysical question. But there is also a neglected evaluative question about God’s existence: Should we want God to exist? Very many, including many atheists and agnostics, appear to think we should. Theists claim that if God didn’t exist things would be far worse, and many atheists agree; they regret God’s inexistence. Some remarks by Thomas Nagel suggest an opposing view: that we should want God not to exist. I call this view anti-theism. I explain how (...)
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  41. Matthew C. Halteman, Ontotheology. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This article aims to serve as an accessible introduction to the idea of "ontotheology" and to the so-called "ontotheological critique of Western metaphysics" for which the twentieth-century German philosopher Martin Heidegger is especially well known. I begin by distinguishing two uses of "ontotheology" employed respectively by Kant and Heidegger, and go on to develop the Heideggerian interpretation and critique of ontotheology under three main headings: The Onto-theo-logical Constitution of Western Metaphysics; Ontotheology's Problematic Legacy: Anxiety, Calculation, Oblivion; and Ontotheology and God. (...)
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  42. Andrew Chignell & Dean Zimmerman (2012). Review: Saving God From Saving God. [REVIEW] Books and Culture 15 (3).
    Mark Johnston’s book, Saving God (Princeton University Press, 2010) has two main goals, one negative and the other positive: (1) to eliminate the gods of the major Western monotheisms (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) as candidates for the role of “the Highest One”; (2) to introduce the real Highest One, a panentheistic deity worthy of devotion and capable of extending to us the grace needed to transform us from inwardly-turned sinners to practitioners of agape. In this review, we argue that Johnston’s (...)
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  43. Brooke Alan Trisel (2012). God's Silence as an Epistemological Concern. Philosophical Forum 43 (4):383-393.
    Throughout history, many people, including Mother Teresa, have been troubled by God’s silence. In spite of the conflicting interpretations of the Bible, God has remained silent. What are the implications of divine hiddenness/silence for a meaning of life? Is there a good reason that explains God’s silence? If God created humanity to fulfill a purpose, then God would have clarified his purpose and our role by now, as I will argue. To help God carry out his purpose, we would need (...)
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  44.  55
    John Martin Fischer & Patrick Todd (eds.) (2015). Freedom, Fatalism, and Foreknowledge. Oxford University Press.
    We typically think we have free will. But how could we have free will, if for anything we do, it was already true in the distant past that we would do that thing? Or how could we have free will, if God already knows in advance all the details of our lives? Such issues raise the specter of "fatalism". This book collects sixteen previously published articles on fatalism, truths about the future, and the relationship between divine foreknowledge and human freedom, (...)
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  45.  66
    Richard Swinburne (1994). The Christian God. Oxford University Press.
    What is it for there to be a God, and what reason is there for supposing him to conform to the claims of Christian doctrine? In this pivotal volume of his tetralogy, Richard Swinburne builds a rigorous metaphysical system for describing the world, and applies this to assessing the worth of the Christian tenets of the Trinity and the Incarnation. Part I is dedicated to analyzing the categories needed to address accounts of the divine nature--substance, cause, time, and necessity. Part (...)
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  46. Robert K. Garcia (2013). Is God's Benevolence Impartial? Southwest Philosophy Review 29 (1):23-30.
    In this paper I consider the intuitive idea that God is fair and does not play favorites. This belief appears to be held by many theists. I will call it the Principle of Impartial Benevolence (PIB) and put it as follows: As much as possible, for all persons, God equally promotes the good and equally prevents the bad. I begin with the conviction that there is a prima facie tension between PIB and the disparity of human suffering. My aim in (...)
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  47.  47
    Brian Davies (2011). Thomas Aquinas on God and Evil. Oxford University Press.
    The problem of evil -- Aquinas, philosophy, and theology -- What there is -- Goodness and badness -- God the creator -- God's perfection and goodness -- The creator and evil -- Providence and grace -- The trinity and Christ -- Aquinas on god and evil.
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  48.  55
    John Foster (2004). The Divine Lawmaker: Lectures on Induction, Laws of Nature, and the Existence of God. Oxford University Press.
    John Foster presents a clear and powerful discussion of a range of topics relating to our understanding of the universe: induction, laws of nature, and the existence of God. He begins by developing a solution to the problem of induction - a solution whose key idea is that the regularities in the workings of nature that have held in our experience hitherto are to be explained by appeal to the controlling influence of laws, as forms of natural necessity. His second (...)
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  49. Benedikt Paul Göcke (2013). An Analytic Theologian's Stance on the Existence of God. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5 (2).
    The existence of God is once again the focus of vivid philosophical discussion. From the point of view of analytic theology, however, people often talk past each other when they debate about the putative existence or nonexistence of God. In the worst case, for instance, atheists deny the existence of a God, which no theists ever claimed to exist. In order to avoid confusions like this we need to be clear about the function of the term 'God' in its different (...)
     
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  50.  6
    Nicholas Everitt (2003). The Non-Existence of God. Routledge London.
    Is it possible to prove or disprove God's existence? Arguments for the existence of God have taken many different forms over the centuries: in The Non-Existence of God, Nicholas Everitt considers all of the arguments and examines the role that reason and knowledge play in the debate over God's existence. He draws on recent scientific disputes over neo-Darwinism, the implication of 'big bang' cosmology, and the temporal and spatial size of the universe; and discusses some of the most recent work (...)
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