Search results for 'God Proof, Ontological' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. I. God (2012). Doomed to Fail: The Sad Epistemolo-Gical Fate of Ontological Arguments. In Miroslaw Szatkowski (ed.), Ontological Proofs Today. Ontos Verlag. 50--413.score: 580.0
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  2. Cecilia Wee (2012). Descartes's Ontological Proof of God's Existence. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):23 - 40.score: 486.0
    This paper argues that an examination of the ontology that underpins Descartes?s Fifth Meditation ontological proof of God?s existence will contribute to a better understanding of the nature and structure of the proof. Attention to the Cartesian meditator?s development of this ontology in earlier meditations also makes clear why this proof could not have been asserted before the Fifth Meditation. Finally, it is argued that Kant?s objections against the ontological proof have no force against Descartes? particular version of (...)
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  3. Marcin Tkaczyk (2008). Is the Ontological Proof for God's Existence an Ontological Proof for God's Existence? Logic and Logical Philosophy 16 (4):289-309.score: 432.0
    Two questions concerning Anselm of Canterbury’s theistic argument provided in Proslogion Ch. 2 are asked and answered: is the argument valid? under what conditions could it be sound? In order to answer the questions the argument is formalized as a first-order theory called AP2. The argument turns out to be valid, although it contains a hidden premise. The argument is also claimed not to be ontological one, but rather an a posteriori argument. One of the premises is found to (...)
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  4. John O. Nelson (1963). Modal Logic and the Ontological Proof for God's Existence. Review of Metaphysics 17 (2):235 - 242.score: 405.0
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  5. P. Æ Hutchings (1967). Anselm's Discovery: A Re-Examination of the Ontological Proof for God's Existence. By Charles Hartshorne. (Illinois: Open Court, 1966. Pp. 333. Price $6). [REVIEW] Philosophy 42 (162):375-.score: 405.0
  6. Dubravko Arbanas (2013). Development of the Ontological Proof of God's Existence and Tillich's Conception of the Ontological Type of Philosophy of Religion. Filozofska Istrazivanja 33 (1):123-137.score: 405.0
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  7. W. T. Harris (1881). Faith and Knowledge: Kant's Refutation of the Ontological Proof of the Being of God. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (4):404 - 428.score: 405.0
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  8. G. D. Duthie & Charles Hartshorne (1967). Anselm's Discovery: A Re-Examination of the Ontological Proof for God's Existence. Philosophical Quarterly 17 (69):381.score: 405.0
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  9. E. L. Mascall (1967). Charles Hartshonie. Anselm's Discovery: A Re-Examination of the Ontological Proof or God's Existence. Pp. Xiv + 334. (Lasalle, Illinois. The Open Court Publishing Company, 1965.) $6.00. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 3 (1):417.score: 405.0
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  10. Marcin Tkaczyk (2007). Is the Ontological Proof of God's Existence an Onto-Logical Proof of God's Existence? Logic and Logical Philosophy 16:289-309.score: 405.0
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  11. Gilles Marmasse (2012). Hegel and the Ontological Proof of the Existence of God. Hegel-Studien 46:79-100.score: 405.0
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  12. A. Nuzzo (1995). A Logical Determination of the Ontological Proof for the Existence of God-Reflections on the Concept of Existence in Light of Hegel's Theory. Hegel-Studien 30:105-120.score: 405.0
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  13. Graham Robert Oppy (1995). Ontological Arguments and Belief in God. Cambridge University Press.score: 402.0
    This book is a unique contribution to the philosophy of religion. It offers a comprehensive discussion of one of the most famous arguments for the existence of God: the ontological argument. The author provides and analyses a critical taxonomy of those versions of the argument that have been advanced in recent philosophical literature, as well as of those historically important versions found in the work of St Anselm, Descartes, Leibniz, Hegel and others. A central thesis of the book is (...)
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  14. Karl Barth (1960/1985). Anselm, Fides Quaerens Intellectum: Anselm's Proof of the Existence of God in the Context of His Theological Scheme. Pickwick Press.score: 360.0
  15. Richard Messer (1993). Does God's Existence Need Proof? Oxford University Press.score: 300.0
    The possibility of proving the existence of God has fascinated thinkers and believers throughout the centuries. This book critically analyzes both sides of the contemporary debate between the two most important living philosophers of religion--Richard Swinburne and D.Z. Phillips--and constructs an alternative solution. Instead of taking sides on the issue of God's existence, Messer argues that behind each thinkers' work, and their attitudes toward proving the existence of God, lies fundamental trust. A positive discussion of relativism leads to a fresh (...)
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  16. Florin Lobont (2010). Ontological Proof and the Critique of Religious Experience. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (27):157-174.score: 279.0
    Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Focusing mainly on a number of unpublished texts by Collingwood, especially his “Lectures on the Ontological Proof of the Existence of God,” the study examines the English philosopher’s innovative interpretation of the Anselm’s main contribution to the philosophical-theological tradition. Collingwood insightfully shows how the ontological argument can be (...)
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  17. Mirosław Szatkowski (2011). Partly Free Semantics for Some Anderson-Like Ontological Proofs. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 20 (4):475-512.score: 270.0
    Anderson-like ontological proofs, studied in this paper, employ contingent identity, free principles of quantification of the 1st order variables and classical principles of quantification of the 2nd order variables. All these theories are strongly complete wrt. classes of modal structures containing families of world-varying objectual domains of the 1st order and constant conceptual domains of the 2nd order. In such structures, terms of the 1st order receive only rigid extensions, which are elements of the union of all 1st order (...)
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  18. Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2009). Thought Experimenting with God. Revisiting the Ontological Argument. Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 51 (3):249-267.score: 267.0
    The ontological argument is one of the most intriguing lines of reasoning in Western thought. Leaving behind debates over the proper relation between science and religion, it makes a simple move from conceptual analysis to existence in order to prove the existence of god. The ontological argument will be reviewed against the background of the contemporary debate on thought experiments. Assuming that the ontological argument fails as a philosophical proof, I will argue that its move from concept (...)
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  19. Daniel A. Dombrowski (2006). Rethinking the Ontological Argument: A Neoclassical Theistic Response. Cambridge University Press.score: 261.0
    In recent years, the ontological argument and theistic metaphysics have been criticized by philosophers working in both the analytic and continental traditions. Responses to these criticisms have primarily come from philosophers who make use of the traditional, and problematic, concept of God. In this volume, Daniel A. Dombrowski defends the ontological argument against its contemporary critics, but he does so by using a neoclassical or process concept of God, thereby strengthening the case for a contemporary theistic metaphysics. Relying (...)
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  20. Robert C. Miner (2002). The Dependence of Descartes' Ontological Proof: Upon the Doctrine of Causa Sui. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 58 (4):873 - 886.score: 261.0
    Can God be the efficient cause of himself (causa sui,)? It is well known that Descartes answers this question in the affirmative, but it is considerably less clear why. The main contention of the essay is that Descartes advances the causa sui doctrine because he came to think that the ontological proof of Meditation V required it. We argue these contentions through a close analysis of Descartes' initial articulation of causa sui in response to Caterus, followed by attention to (...)
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  21. Kevin J. Harrelson (2009). The Ontological Argument From Descartes to Hegel. Humanity Books.score: 261.0
    Proof and perception : the context of the argumentum cartesianum -- Refutations of atheism : ontological arguments in English philosophy, 1652-1705 -- Being and intuition : Malebranche's appropriation of the argument -- An adequate conception : the argument in Spinoza's philosophy -- Ontological arguments in Leibniz and the German enlightenment -- Kant's systematic critique of the ontological argument -- Hegel's reconstruction of the argument.
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  22. Monica Fernandes Abreu (2010). O discurso racional cartesiano na segunda prova da existência de Deus (The racional cartesian discourse on the second proof of God's existence). Horizonte 8 (16):153-165.score: 261.0
    Esta reflexão pretende mostrar o discurso racional cartesiano na segunda prova da existência de Deus. Para tanto, Descartes se depara com uma pergunta central: qual a causa da existência da res cogitans que é finita e possui a ideia de infinito? A resposta é encontrada na desproporcionalidade ontológica entre o finito e o infinito. Essa desproporcionalidade é elucidada mediante dois conceitos: o princípio de causalidade que determina que a causa deve ser igual ou superior a coisa causada e o princípio (...)
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  23. Alessandro Medri (2011). The Ontological Proof and the Notion of Experience in Schelling. Idealistic Studies 41 (1-2):69 - 82.score: 261.0
    In this article I show how Schelling elaborates the fundamental topic of the ontological proof, from the first phase of his philosophy on. I make clear how he keenly penetrates the formulation of Descartes, establishing that it is insufficient in order to demonstrate the existence of God. The fact is, Descartes says that it would be contradictory with the nature of the prefect being that he existed only accidentally; so that it can exist only necessarily. But it is different (...)
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  24. Stanley Tweyman (2008). A Humean Criticism of the Cosmological-Ontological Proof. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:357-364.score: 261.0
    In Part 9 of David Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, a series of five criticisms is presented against the Cosmological-Ontological Proof of God’s necessary existence. In essence, the Cosmological-Ontological Proof seeks to establish that that the chain of causes and effects that constitutes the world, despite being eternal, requires a cause, in virtue of the contingency of the chain and its members. The argument attempts to defend the position that, of the four possible causal explanations for the chain (...)
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  25. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (ed.) (2007). Lectures on the Proofs of the Existence of God. Oxford University Press.score: 255.0
    The Hegel Lectures Series Series Editor: Peter C. Hodgson Hegel's lectures have had as great a historical impact as the works he himself published. Important elements of his system are elaborated only in the lectures, especially those given in Berlin during the last decade of his life. The original editors conflated materials from different sources and dates, obscuring the development and logic of Hegel's thought. The Hegel Lectures series is based on a selection of extant and recently discovered transcripts and (...)
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  26. Brian Leftow (2012). God and Necessity. Oxford University Press.score: 243.0
    Modal basics -- Some solutions -- Theist solutions -- The ontology of possibility -- Modal truthmakers -- Modality and the divine nature -- Deity as essential -- Against deity theories -- The role of deity -- The biggest bang -- Divine concepts -- Concepts, syntax, and actualism -- Modality: basic notions -- The genesis of secular modality -- Modal reality -- Essences -- Non-secular modalities -- Theism and modal semantics -- Freedom, preference, and cost -- Explaining modal status -- Explaining (...)
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  27. John Foster (2004). The Divine Lawmaker: Lectures on Induction, Laws of Nature, and the Existence of God. Oxford University Press.score: 234.0
    John Foster presents a clear and powerful discussion of a range of topics relating to our understanding of the universe: induction, laws of nature, and the existence of God. He begins by developing a solution to the problem of induction - a solution whose key idea is that the regularities in the workings of nature that have held in our experience hitherto are to be explained by appeal to the controlling influence of laws, as forms of natural necessity. His second (...)
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  28. Robert D. Shofner (1974). Anselm Revisited: A Study on the Role of the Ontological Argument in the Writings of Karl Barth and Charles Hartshorne. Brill.score: 234.0
    CHAPTER ONE A "COPERNICAN REVOLUTION" IN THEOLOGICAL METHOD A. Introduct1on The subject of theology is the history of the communion of God with man and of ...
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  29. John Duns Scotus (1966). A Treatise on God as First Principle. [Chicago?]Forum Books.score: 234.0
    It was this kind of priority Aristotle had in mind in his proof that act is prior to potency in the ninth book of the Metaphysics where he calls act prior ...
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  30. Andrew Moore (2003). Realism and Christian Faith: God, Grammar, and Meaning. Cambridge University Press.score: 234.0
    The question of realism - that is, whether God exists independently of human beings - is central to much contemporary theology and church life. It is also an important topic in the philosophy of religion. This book discusses the relationship between realism and Christian faith in a thorough and systematic way and uses the resources of both philosophy and theology to argue for a Christocentric narrative realism. Many previous defences of realism have attempted to model Christian belief on scientific theory (...)
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  31. Denys Turner (2004). Faith, Reason, and the Existence of God. Cambridge University Press.score: 234.0
    Denys Turner argues that there are reasons of faith why the existence of God should be thought rationally demonstrable and that it is worthwhile revisiting the theology of Thomas Aquinas to see why. The proposition that the existence of God is demonstrable by rational argument is doubted by nearly all philosophical opinion today and is thought by most Christian theologians to be incompatible with Christian faith. Turner's robust challenge to the prevailing orthodoxies will be of interest to believers as well (...)
     
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  32. Georges Dicker (1993). Descartes: An Analytical and Historical Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 231.0
    A solid grasp of the main themes and arguments of the seventeenth century philosopher Rene Descartes is an essential tool towards understanding modern thought, and a necessary entree to the work of the empiricists and Immanuel Kant, and to the study of contemporary epistemology and philosophy of mind. Clear and accessible, this book serves as an introduction to Descartes's ideas for undergraduates and as a sophisticated companion to his Meditations for more advanced readers. After a thorough discussion of the main (...)
     
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  33. Jonathan Barnes (1972). The Ontological Argument. [New York]St. Martin's Press.score: 225.0
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  34. Richard James Campbell (1976). From Belief to Understanding: A Study of Anselm's Proslogion Argument on the Existence of God. Faculty of Arts, Australian National University.score: 225.0
  35. John C. Carney (2005). A Postmodern Argument From Tradition for the Existence of God. E. Mellen Press.score: 225.0
     
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  36. Clement Dore (1996). On the Existence and Relevance of God. St. Martin's Press.score: 225.0
     
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  37. Herbert Lamm (1940). The Relation of Concept and Demonstration in the Ontological Argument. [Chicago].score: 225.0
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  38. Alvin Plantinga (1968). The Ontological Argument From St. Anselm to Contemporary Philosophers. London, Macmillan.score: 225.0
     
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  39. Nicholas Rescher (1959). The Ontological Proof Revisited. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):138 – 148.score: 216.0
    "I began to ask myself whether there might be found a single argument which would require no other for its proof than itself alone, and would suffice to demonstrate that God truly exists." - St. Anselm.
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  40. Vijay Mascarenhas (2002). Descartes' Cosmological and Ontological Proofs of God's Existence: A Refutation of Skepticism? Philosophical Investigations 25 (2):190–200.score: 215.0
  41. David L. Paulsen (1984). The Logically Possible, the Ontologically Possible and Ontological Proofs of God's Existence. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 16 (1):41 - 49.score: 215.0
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  42. Perry Smith (1971). Review: Charles Hartshorne, Ten Ontological or Modal Proofs for God's Existence. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (3):515-515.score: 215.0
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  43. Tadeusz Grzesik (2012). Faith and Conscience--The Surest of Arguments for the Existence of God. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 17 (2):245-268.score: 207.0
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  44. Srećko Kovač (2012). Modal Collapse in Gödel's Ontological Proof. In Miroslaw Szatkowski (ed.), Ontological Proofs Today. Ontos Verlag. 50--323.score: 204.0
    After introductory reminder of and comments on Gödel’s ontological proof, we discuss the collapse of modalities, which is provable in Gödel’s ontological system GO. We argue that Gödel’s texts confirm modal collapse as intended consequence of his ontological system. Further, we aim to show that modal collapse properly fits into Gödel’s philosophical views, especially into his ontology of separation and union of force and fact, as well as into his cosmological theory of the nonobjectivity of the lapse (...)
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  45. Gregor Damschen (2011). Questioning Gödel's Ontological Proof: Is Truth Positive? European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (1):161-169.score: 200.0
    In his "Ontological proof", Kurt Gödel introduces the notion of a second-order value property, the positive property P. The second axiom of the proof states that for any property φ: If φ is positive, its negation is not positive, and vice versa. I put forward that this concept of positiveness leads into a paradox when we apply it to the following self-reflexive sentences: (A) The truth value of A is not positive; (B) The truth value of B is positive. (...)
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  46. Martin Lin (2007). Spinoza's Arguments for the Existence of God. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):269-297.score: 198.0
    It is often thought that, although <span class='Hi'>Spinoza</span> develops a bold and distinctive conception of God (the unique substance, or Natura Naturans, in which all else inheres and which possesses infinitely many attributes, including extension), the arguments that he offers which purport to prove God’s existence contribute nothing new to natural theology. Rather, he is seen as just another participant in the seventeenthcentury revival of the ontological argument initiated by Descartes and taken up by Malebranche and Leibniz among others. (...)
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  47. Keith Burgess-Jackson (2014). Does Anselm Beg the Question? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 76 (1):5-18.score: 198.0
    Saint Anselm’s ontological argument for the existence of God, formulated nearly a millennium ago, continues to bedevil philosophers. There is no consensus about what, if anything, is wrong with it. Some philosophers insist that the argument is invalid. Others concede its validity but insist that it is unsound. A third group of philosophers maintain that Anselm begs the question. It has been argued, for example, that Anselm’s use of the name “God” in a premise assumes (or presupposes) precisely what (...)
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  48. Catherine Wilson (2003). Descartes's Meditations: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 189.0
    In this new introduction to a classic philosophical text, Catherine Wilson examines the arguments of Descartes' famous Meditations, the book which launched modern philosophy. Drawing on the reinterpretations of Descartes' thought of the past twenty-five years, she shows how Descartes constructs a theory of the mind, the body, nature, and God from a premise of radical uncertainty. She discusses in detail the historical context of Descartes' writings and their relationship to early modern science, and at the same time she introduces (...)
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  49. Gary C. Hatfield (2003). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Descartes and the Meditations. Routledge.score: 180.0
    Descartes' Meditations is one of the most widely read philosophical texts and has marked the beginning of what we now consider as modern philosophy. It is the first text that most students of philosophy are introduced to and this Guidebook will be an indispensable introduction to what is undeniably one of the most important texts in the history of philosophy. Gary Hatfield offers a clear and concise introduction to Descartes' background, a careful reading of the Meditations and a methodological investigation (...)
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