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  1. Robert E. Goodin (forthcoming). Epiphenomenal Egalitarianism. Social Research.
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  2. Robert E. Goodin & Diane Gibson (forthcoming). Rights, Young and Old. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 17 (2):185-204.
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  3. Mark Bovens, Robert E. Goodin & Thomas Schillemans (eds.) (2014). The Oxford Handbook of Public Accountability. Oup Oxford.
    Drawing on the best scholars in the field from around the world, The Oxford Handbook of Public Accountability showcases conceptual and normative as well as the empirical approaches in public accountability studies.
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  4. Robert E. Goodin & Christian Barry (2014). Benefiting From the Wrongdoing of Others. Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):363-376.
    Bracket out the wrong of committing a wrong, or conspiring or colluding or conniving with others in their committing one. Suppose you have done none of those things, and you find yourself merely benefiting from a wrong committed wholly by someone else. What, if anything, is wrong with that? What, if any, duties follow from it? If straightforward restitution were possible — if you could just ‘give back’ what you received as a result of the wrongdoing to its rightful owner (...)
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  5. Robert E. Goodin & Ana Tanasoca (2014). Double Voting. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (4):743-758.
    The democratic egalitarian ideal requires that everyone should enjoy equal power over the world through voting. If it is improper to vote twice in the same election, why should it be permissible for dual citizens to vote in two different places? Several possible excuses are considered and rejected.
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  6. Geoffrey Brennan, Lina Eriksson, Robert E. Goodin & Nicholas Southwood (2013). Explaining Norms. Oxford University Press.
    Norms are a pervasive yet mysterious feature of social life. In Explaining Norms, four philosophers and social scientists team up to grapple with some of the many mysteries, offering a comprehensive account of norms: what they are; how and why they emerge, persist and change; and how and to what extent they themselves serve to explain what we do. Norms, they argue, should be understood in non-reductive terms as clusters of normative attitudes that serve the function of making us accountable (...)
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  7. Robert E. Goodin (2013). Author Q & A. The Philosophers' Magazine 63:125-126.
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  8. R. E. Goodin (2012). Excused by the Unwillingness of Others? Analysis 72 (1):18-24.
    No one is excused from doing what he ought to do merely because he is unwilling to do it. But what if others are unwilling to play their necessary role in some joint venture that you all ought to undertake: might that excuse you from doing what you yourself ought to do as part of that? It would, if you were genuinely willing to play your necessary part if they were. But the unwillingness of everyone involved cannot reciprocally serve to (...)
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  9. Robert E. Goodin (2012). On Settling. Princeton University Press.
    Introduction -- Modes of settling: settling down, settling in, settling up, settling for, settling one's affairs, settling on -- The value of settling: settling as an aid to planning and agency, settling, commitment, trust, and confidence, settling the social fabric -- What settling is not: settling is not just compromising, settling is not just conservatism, settling is not just resignation -- Settling in aid of striving: settling in order to strive, what strivings require settling, and why, when to switch between (...)
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  10. Kai Spiekermann & Robert E. Goodin (2012). Courts of Many Minds. British Journal of Political Science 42:555-571.
    In 'A Constitution of Many Minds' Cass Sunstein argues that the three major approaches to constitutional interpretation – Traditionalism, Populism and Cosmopolitanism – all rely on some variation of a ‘many-minds’ argument. Here we assess each of these claims through the lens of the Condorcet Jury Theorem. In regard to the first two approaches we explore the implications of sequential influence among courts (past and foreign, respectively). In regard to the Populist approach, we consider the influence of opinion leaders.
     
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  11. Robert E. Goodin (2011). Richard Miller, Relationship Counselor to the World. Analytic Philosophy 52 (3):203-212.
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  12. Robert E. Goodin & Joanne C. Lau (2011). Enfranchising Incompetents: Suretyship and the Joint Authorship of Laws. Ratio 24 (2):154-166.
    Proposals to lower the age of voting, to 15 for example, are regularly met with worries that people that age are not sufficiently ‘competent’. Notice however that we allow people that age to sign binding legal contracts, provided that those contracts are co-signed by their parents. Notice, further, that in a democracy voters are collectively ‘joint authors’ of the laws that they enact. Enfranchising some less competent voters is no worry, the Condorcet Jury Theorem assures us, so long as the (...)
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  13. Chiara Lepora & Robert E. Goodin (2011). Grading Complicity in Rwandan Refugee Camps. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (3):259-276.
    Complicity with wrongdoing comes in many forms and many degrees. We distinguish subcategories cooperation, collaboration and collusion from connivance and condoning, identifying their defining features and assessing their characteristic moral valences. We illustrate the use of these distinctions by reference to events in refugee camps in and around Rwanda after the 1994 genocide, and the extent to which international organizations and nongovernment organizations were wrongfully complicit with the misuse of refugees as human shields by the perpetrators of the genocide who (...)
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  14. M. Baurmann, G. Brennan, R. Goodin & N. Southwood (eds.) (2010). Norms and Values. Nomos Verlag.
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  15. James S. Fishkin & Robert E. Goodin (eds.) (2010). Population and Political Theory. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Part of the highly regarded Philosophy, Politics and Society series, this text is an important resource for political philosophers who wish to know about population policy, population specialists interested in political theory, and public ...
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  16. Robert Goodin (2010). Norms Honoured in the Breach. In M. Baurmann G. Brennan & R. E. Goodin N. Southwood (eds.), Norms and Values: The Role of Social Norms as Instruments of Value Realisation. Nomos. 289-298.
    http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/ZIF/Publikationen/books/10_Baurmann_NormsAndValues.html.
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  17. Robert E. Goodin (2010). An Epistemic Case for Legal Moralism. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (4):615-633.
    Ignorance of the law is no excuse, or so we are told. But why not? The statute books run to hundreds of volumes. How can an ordinary citizen know what is in them? The best way might be for law (at least in its wide-scope duty-conferring aspects) to track broad moral principles that ordinary citizens can know and apply for themselves. In contrast to more high-minded and deeply principled arguments, this epistemic argument for legal moralism is purely pragmatic—but importantly so. (...)
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  18. Charles R. Beitz & Robert E. Goodin (eds.) (2009). Global Basic Rights. OUP Oxford.
    Politically, as well as philosophically, concerns with human rights have permeated many of the most important debates on social justice worldwide for fully a half-century. Henry Shue's 1980 book on Basic Rights proved to be a pioneering contribution to those debates, and one that continues to elicit both critical and constructive comment. Global Basic Rights brings together many of the most influential contemporary writers in political philosophy and international relations - Charles Beitz, Robert Goodin, Christian Reus-Smit, Andrew Hurrell, Judith Lichtenberg, (...)
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  19. Charles R. Beitz & Robert E. Goodin (2009). Introduction: Basic Rights and Beyond. In Charles R. Beitz & Robert E. Goodin (eds.), Global Basic Rights. Oup Oxford. 1--24.
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  20. R. E. Goodin (2009). Brian Barry (1936-2009). Political Theory 37 (4):451-454.
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  21. Robert E. Goodin (2009). Demandingness as a Virtue. Journal of Ethics 13 (1):1 - 13.
    Philosophers who complain about the ‹demandingness’ of morality forget that a morality can make too few demands as well as too many. What we ought be seeking is an appropriately demanding morality. This article recommends a ‹moral satisficing’ approach to determining when a morality is ‹demanding enough’, and an institutionalized solution to keeping the demands within acceptable limits.
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  22. Robert E. Goodin (2009). Rationalising Discursive Anomalies. Theoria 56 (119):1-13.
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  23. Robert E. Goodin & Lina Eriksson (2009). Democratically Relevant Alternatives. Analysis 69 (1):9-17.
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  24. Lea Ypi, Robert E. Goodin & Christian Barry (2009). Associative Duties, Global Justice, and the Colonies. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (2):103-135.
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  25. Robert E. Goodin (2008). Clubbish Justice. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 7 (2):233-237.
    Kai Spiekermann shows how groups of people cooperating purely for mutual advantage could solve social dilemmas by `assortation', deftly including and excluding people from the group of people who are cooperating among themselves. This article explores the normative implications of that result, casting further doubt on normative models treating justice as a `club good'. Key Words: justice • club • non-ideal theory.
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  26. Robert E. Goodin (2008). Innovating Democracy: Democratic Theory and Practice After the Deliberative Turn. OUP Oxford.
    In recent years democratic theory has taken a deliberative turn. Instead of merely casting the occasional ballot, deliberative democrats want citizens to reason together. They embrace 'talk as a decision procedure'. But of course thousands or millions of people cannot realistically talk to one another all at once. When putting their theories into practice, deliberative democrats therefore tend to focus on 'mini-publics', usually of a couple dozen to a couple hundred people. The central question then is how to connect micro-deliberations (...)
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  27. Richard J. Arneson, Robert E. Goodin, David Schmidtz, Agnieszka Jaworska, Caspar Hare & Lionel K. McPherson (2007). 10. Laurence Thomas, The Family and the Political Self Laurence Thomas, The Family and the Political Self (Pp. 580-585). In Laurie DiMauro (ed.), Ethics. Greenhaven Press.
     
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  28. Geoffrey Brennan, Robert E. Goodin & Michael A. Smith (eds.) (2007). Common Minds: Themes From the Philosophy of Philip Pettit. Oxford University Press.
    During a career spanning over thirty years Philip Pettit has made seminal contributions in moral philosophy, political philosophy, philosophy of the social sciences, philosophy of mind and action, and metaphysics. The corpus of work Pettit has contributed and stimulated is all the more remarkable because of the way in which Pettit and his circle adapt lessons learned when thinking about problems in one area of philosophy to problems in a completely different area. -/- Common Minds presents specially written papers by (...)
     
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  29. Lina Eriksson & Robert E. Goodin (2007). The Measuring Rod of Time: The Example of Swedish Day-Fines. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):125–136.
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  30. Robert E. Goodin (2007). Enfranchising All Affected Interests, and its Alternatives. Philosophy and Public Affairs 35 (1):40–68.
  31. Robert E. Goodin (2007). Why Social Justice is Not All That Matters: Justice as the First Virtue. Ethics 117 (3):413-432.
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  32. Robert E. Goodin & Frank Jackson (2007). Freedom From Fear. Philosophy and Public Affairs 35 (3):249–265.
  33. Robert E. Goodin, Philip Pettit & Thomas W. Pogge (eds.) (2007). A Companion to Contemporary Political Philosophy, 2 Volume Set. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  34. Robert E. Goodin, Philip Pettit & Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge (eds.) (2007). A Companion to Contemporary Political Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
    The second edition updates and expands the coverage to include developments in the field over the past decade, especially in the areas of international politics and global justice. New contributors include some of today’s most distinguished scholars, among them Thomas Pogge, Charles Beitz, and Michael Doyle Provides in-depth coverage of contemporary philosophical debate in all major related disciplines, such as economics, history, law, political science, international relations and sociology Presents analysis of key political ideologies, including new chapters on Cosmopolitanism and (...)
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  35. Michael Smith, Robert Goodin & Geoffrey Geoffrey (eds.) (2007). Common Minds. Oxford.
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  36. Robert E. Goodin (2006). Liberal Multiculturalism: Protective and Polyglot. Political Theory 34 (3):289 - 303.
    By analogy to Macpherson's "protective" and "self-developmental" models of liberal democracy, there might be two distinct models of liberal multiculturalism. On the protective-style model, the aim is to protect minority cultures against assimilationist and homogenizing intrusions of the majority. On the other model, here dubbed "polyglot multiculturalism," the majority might expand its own "context for choice" by having more minority cultures from whom to borrow. The latter is a more welcoming and inclusive strategy, still recognizably liberal in form, than (...)
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  37. Robert E. Goodin (2006). The Benefits of Multiple Biased Observers. Episteme 3 (3):166-174.
    : We know that we can learn much from the reports of multiple competent, independent, unbiased observers. There are also things we can learn from the reports of competent but biased observers. Specifically, when reports go against the grain of an agent's known biases, we can be relatively confident in the veracity of those reports. Triangulating on the truth via that mechanism requires a multiplicity of observers with distinct biases, each of whose reports might be one-way decisive in that fashion. (...)
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  38. Robert E. Goodin (2006). The Epistemic Benefi Ts of Multiple Biased Observers. Episteme 3 (3):166-174.
    We know that we can learn much from the reports of multiple competent, independent, unbiased observers. There are also things we can learn from the reports of competent but biased observers. Specifically, when reports go against the grain of an agent’s known biases, we can be relatively confident in the veracity of those reports. Triangulating on the truth via that mechanism requires a multiplicity of observers with distinct biases, each of whose reports might be one-way decisive in that fashion. It (...)
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  39. Robert E. Goodin (2006). Volenti Goes to Market. Journal of Ethics 10 (1-2):53 - 74.
    If free markets consist in nothing more than “capitalist acts between consenting adults,” and if in the old legal maxim “volenti non fit injuria,” then it seems to follow that free markets do no wrongs. But that defense of free markets wrenches the “volenti” maxim out of context. In common law adjudication of disputes between two parties, it is perfectly appropriate to cast standards of “volenti” narrowly, and largely ignore “duress via third parties” (wrongs done to or by others who (...)
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  40. Robert E. Goodin & Christian List (2006). A Conditional Defense of Plurality Rule: Generalizing May's Theorem in a Restricted Informational Environment. American Journal of Political Science 50 (4):940-949.
    May's theorem famously shows that, in social decisions between two options, simple majority rule uniquely satisfies four appealing conditions. Although this result is often cited in support of majority rule, it has never been extended beyond decisions based on pairwise comparisons of options. We generalize May's theorem to many-option decisions where voters each cast one vote. Surprisingly, plurality rule uniquely satisfies May's conditions. This suggests a conditional defense of plurality rule: If a society's balloting procedure collects only a single vote (...)
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  41. Robert E. Goodin & Christian List, Special Majorities Rationalized.
    Complaints are common about the arbitrary and conservative bias of special-majority rules. Such complaints, however, apply to asymmetrical versions of those rules alone. Symmetrical special-majority rules remedy that defect, albeit at the cost of often rendering no determinate verdict. Here what is formally at stake, both procedurally and epistemically, is explored in the choice between those two forms of special-majority rule and simple-majority rule; and practical ways are suggested of resolving matters left open by symmetrical special-majority rules – such as (...)
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  42. Robert E. Goodin & Philip Pettit (eds.) (2006). Contemporary Political Philosophy: An Anthology. Blackwell Publishing.
    This authoritative collection of the seminal texts in post-war political philosophy has now been updated and expanded. Reprints key articles, mainly unabridged, touching upon the nature of the state, democracy, justice, rights, liberty, equality and oppression. Includes work from politics, law and economics, as well as from continental and analytic philosophy. Now includes thirteen additional texts, taking account of recent developments in the field and reflecting the most pressing concerns in international affairs. Can be used alongside A Companion to Contemporary (...)
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  43. Robert E. Goodin & Charles Tilly (eds.) (2006). The Oxford Handbook of Contextual Political Analysis. Oxford University Press.
    The Oxford Handbooks of Political Science is a ten-volume set of reference books offering authoritative and engaging critical overviews of the state of political science. This volume, The Oxford Handbook of Contextual Political Analysis, sets out to synthesize and critique for the first time those approaches to political science that offer a more fine-grained qualitative analysis of the political world. The work in the volume has a common aim in being sensitive to the thoughts of contextual nuances that disappear from (...)
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  44. Charles Tilly & Robert E. Goodin (2006). It Depends. In Robert E. Goodin & Charles Tilly (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Contextual Political Analysis. Oxford University Press. 3--32.
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  45. James S. Fishkin & Robert E. Goodin (2005). Introduction: Population & Political Theory. Journal of Political Philosophy 13 (4):373–376.
  46. R. E. Goodin (2005). Book Review: Liberal Languages: Ideological Imaginations and Twentieth-Century Progressive Thought. [REVIEW] Political Theory 33 (6):899-901.
  47. Robert E. Goodin (2005). Toward an International Rule of Law: Distinguishing International Law-Breakers From Would-Be Law-Makers. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):225 - 246.
    An interesting fact about customary international law is that the only way you can propose an amendment to it is by breaking it. How can that be differentiated from plain law-breaking? What moral standards might apply to that sort of international conduct? I propose we use ones analogous to the ordinary standards for distinguishing civil disobedients from ordinary law-breakers: would-be law-makers, like civil disobedients, must break the law openly; they must accept the legal consequences of doing so; and they must (...)
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  48. Keith M. Dowding, Robert E. Goodin, Carole Pateman & Brian Barry (eds.) (2004). Justice and Democracy: Essays for Brian Barry. Cambridge University Press.
    While much has been written about social justice, even more has been written about democracy. Rarely is the relationship between social justice and democracy carefully considered. Does justice require democracy? Will democracy bring justice? This volume brings together leading authors who consider the relationship of democracy and justice. The intrinsic justness of democracy is challenged and the relationship between justice, democracy and the common good examined.
     
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  49. Robert E. Goodin (2004). Support with Strings: Workfare as an 'Impermissible Condition'. Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (3):297–308.
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