Search results for 'Gordan Graham' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jonathan Haidt & Jesse Graham, Haidt & Graham --.score: 120.0
    Most academic efforts to understand morality and ideology come from theorists who limit the domain of morality to issues related to harm and fairness. For such theorists, conservative beliefs are puzzles requiring non-moral explanations. In contrast, we present moral foundations theory, which broadens the moral domain to match the anthropological literature on morality. We extend the theory by integrating it with a review of the sociological constructs of community, authority, and sacredness, as formulated by Emile Durkheim and others. We present (...)
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  2. Gordan Graham (2011). Editorial. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (2).score: 120.0
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  3. Gordon Graham (2008). An Ending and Perhaps a Beginning: A Message From Gordon Graham. Logos 19 (3):108-108.score: 120.0
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  4. Dan Graham (2007). Power [TMP]. P. 12). Graham's Artistic Self-Fashioning Follows Directly on the Heels of Such Minimalist Artist-Critics as Donald Judd, Dan Flavin and Sol LeWitt. Graham Started Out as The. [REVIEW] In Diarmuid Costello & Jonathan Vickery (eds.), Art: Key Contemporary Thinkers. Berg. 8.score: 120.0
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  5. Joseph F. Graham (1992). Onomatopoetics: Theory of Language and Literature. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    The relationship of words to the things they represent and to the mind that forms them has long been the subject of linguistic enquiry. Joseph Graham's challenging book takes this debate into the field of literary theory, making a searching enquiry into the nature of literary representation. It reviews the arguments of Plato's Cratylus on how words signify things, and of Chomsky's theory of the innate "natural" status of language (contrasted with Saussure's notion of its essential arbitrariness). In the (...)
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  6. Peter J. Graham (2011). Perceptual Entitlement and Basic Beliefs. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 153 (3):467-475.score: 60.0
    Perceptual entitlement and basic beliefs Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11098-010-9603-3 Authors Peter J. Graham, University of California, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA USA Journal Philosophical Studies Online ISSN 1573-0883 Print ISSN 0031-8116.
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  7. Gordon Graham (1999). The Internet: A Philosophical Inquiry. Routledge.score: 60.0
    The Internet: A Philosophical Inquiry explores the tensions between the warnings of the Neo-Luddites and the bright optimism of the Technophiles, Graham offers the first concise and accessible exploration of the issues which arise as we enter further into the world of Cyberspace. This original and fascinating study takes us to the heart of questions that none of us can afford to ignore: how does the Internet affect our concepts of identity, moral anarchy, censorship, community, democracy, virtual reality (...)
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  8. George Graham (1993). Philosophy of Mind: An Introduction. Blackwell.score: 60.0
    In this second edition, George Graham maintains the strengths, structure, and overall features of the first, but expands its scope, deepens the detail, and ...
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  9. Gordon Graham (2002). Genes: A Philosophical Inquiry. Routledge.score: 60.0
    "It's all in the genes." Is this true, and if so, what is all in the genes? Genes: A Philosophical Inquiry is a crystal clear and highly informative guide to a debate none of us can afford to ignore. Beginning with a much-needed overview of the relationship between science and technology, Gordon Graham lucidly explains and assesses the most important and controversial aspects of the genes debate: Darwinian theory and its critics, the idea of the "selfish" gene, evolutionary (...)
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  10. Gordon Graham (2004). Eight Theories of Ethics. Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group.score: 60.0
    Eight Theories of Ethics is a comprehensive introduction to the fundamental theories of ethics . Gordon Graham begins by introducing fundamental issues that underpin the concept of ethics, such as relativism and objectivity, before introducing eight major theories: * Egoism * Hedonism * Naturalism and Virtue Theory * Existentialism * Kantianism * Utilitarianism * Contractualism * Religion The author brings often abstract issues to life by drawing on examples from the great moral philosophers, including Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Mill, Nietzsche, (...)
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  11. David Graham & Nathan Nobis (2006). Putting Humans First? [REVIEW] Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 8 (1):85 - 104.score: 60.0
    In Putting Humans First: Why We Are Natures Favorite, Tibor Machan argues against moral perspectives that require taking animals' interests seriously. He attempts to defend the status quo regarding routine, harmful uses of animals for food, fashion and experimentation. Graham and Nobis argue that Machan's work fails to resist pro-animal moral conclusions that are supported by a wide range of contemporary ethical arguments.
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  12. Keith Graham (2002). Practical Reasoning in a Social World: How We Act Together. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In this book Keith Graham examines the philosophical assumptions behind the ideas of group membership and loyalty. Drawing out the significance of social context, he challenges individualist views by placing collectivities such as committees, classes or nations within the moral realm. He offers a new understanding of the multiplicity of sources which vie for the attention of human beings as they decide how to act, and challenges the conventional division between self-interest and altruism. He also offers a systematic (...)
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  13. Gordon Graham (2010). Theories of Ethics: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy with a Selection of Classic Readings. Routledge.score: 60.0
    This book is a radical revision of Gordon Graham "s Eight Theories of Ethics(Routledge 2004).
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  14. Philip Graham & David Rooney (2001). A Sociolinguistic Approach to Applied Epistemology: Examining Technocratic Values in Global 'Knowledge' Policy. Social Epistemology 15 (3):155 – 169.score: 60.0
    This special issue presents an excellent opportunity to study applied epistemology in public policy. This is an important task because the arena of public policy is the social domain in which macro conditions for ‘knowledge work’ and ‘knowledge industries’ are defined and created. We argue that knowledge-related public policy has become overly concerned with creating the politico-economic parameters for the commodification of knowledge. Our policy scope is broader than that of Fuller (1988), who emphasizes the need for a social epistemology (...)
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  15. Elaine L. Graham (ed.) (2009). Grace Jantzen: Redeeming the Present. Ashgate Pub. Ltd..score: 60.0
    Chapter Redeeming the Present Elaine Graham What does it mean to do feminist moral philosophy with notions of utopia and transformation as points of ...
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  16. Gordon Graham (2007). The Re-Enchantment of the World: Art Versus Religion. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    The Re-enchantment of the World is a philosophical exploration of the role of art and religion as sources of meaning in an increasingly material world dominated by science. Gordon Graham takes as his starting point Max Weber's idea that contemporary Western culture is marked by a 'disenchantment of the world' -- the loss of spiritual value in the wake of religion's decline and the triumph of the physical and biological sciences. Relating themes in Hegel, Nietzsche, Schleiermacher, Schopenhauer, and Gadamer (...)
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  17. Daniel W. Graham (1987). Aristotle's Two Systems. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Each of the two major approaches to Aristotle--the unitarian, which understands his work as forming a single, unified system, and the developmentalist, which seeks a sequence of developing ideas--has inherent limitations. This book proposes a synthetic view of Aristotle that sees development as a change between systematic theories. Setting theories of the so-called logical works beside theories of the physical and metaphysical treatises, Graham shows that Aristotle's doctrines fall into two distinct systems of philosophies that are genetically related. (...)
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  18. Gordon Graham (2001). Evil and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Genocide in Rwanda, multiple murder at Denver or Dunblane, the gruesome activities of serial killers - what makes these great evils, and why do they occur? In addressing such questions this book, unusually, interconnects contemporary moral philosophy with recent work in New Testament scholarship. The conclusions to emerge are surprising. Gordon Graham argues that the inability of modernist thought to account satisfactorily for evil and its occurrence should not lead us to embrace an eclectic postmodernism, but to take seriously (...)
     
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  19. Gordon Graham (1986). Politics in its Place: A Study of Six Ideologies. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Deftly combining political science and philosophy, Graham systematically examines the central political ideologies of the Western world, including liberalism, socialism, democracy, nationalism, fascism, anarchy, and conservatism. He provides a clear account of the place of ideology in politics, touching on various sociological explanations as well as Marxist definitions. He explores the ideas of Mill, Marx, Locke, Luther, Fanon, Mussolini, and Burke as well as those of recent writers such as Robert Nozick, Roger Scruton, and Michael Oakeshott.
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  20. Daniel Graham (2013). Science Before Socrates: Parmenides, Anaxagoras, and the New Astronomy. Oup Usa.score: 60.0
    In Science before Socrates, Daniel W. Graham argues against the belief that the Presocratic philosophers did not produce any empirical science and that the first major Greek science, astronomy, did not develop until at least the time of Plato. Instead, Graham proposes that the advances made by Presocratic philosophers in the study of astronomy deserve to be considered as scientific contributions.
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  21. Noelle Graham (2010). Eating Disorders: The Ethics of Media Reporting. Bioethics Research Notes 22 (2):25.score: 60.0
    Graham, Noelle Comparisons are drawn between media reporting of eating disorders and other.forms of self-harm. Proper understanding of these illnesses can protect sufferers from further harm caused by inaccurate and insensitive reporting.
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  22. Terence E. Horgan, John L. Tienson & George Graham (2004). Phenomenal Intentionality and the Brain in a Vat. In Richard Schantz (ed.), The Externalist Challenge. Walter De Gruyter.score: 30.0
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  23. George Graham & Hugh LaFollette (1986). Honesty and Intimacy. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships.score: 30.0
    Current professional and lay lore overlook the role of honesty in developing and sustaining intimate relationships. We wish to assert its importance. We begin by analyzing the notion of intimacy. An intimate encounter or exchange, we argue, is one in which one verbally or non-verbally privately reveals something about oneself, and does so in a sensitive, trusting way. An intimate relationship is one marked by regular intimate encounters or exchanges. Then, we consider two sorts of cases where it is widely (...)
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  24. George Graham & Terence E. Horgan (2000). Mary Mary, Quite Contrary. Philosophical Studies 99 (1):59-87.score: 30.0
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  25. Gordon Graham (1983). What is Special About Democracy? Mind 92 (365):94-102.score: 30.0
    In this paper it is argued that neither the simple majority rule conception of democracy nor representative democracy can be shown to be politically valuable in themselves. Certain arguments of brian barry's to the effect that democracy is special are examined and found wanting. A conclusion is that democratic institutions are valuable only as constitutional checks and balances, And whether this is so in any particular case is a contingent question.
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  26. George Graham (1999). Self-Consciousness, Psychopathology, and Realism About the Self. Anthropology and Philosophy 3 (2).score: 30.0
  27. George Graham, Behaviorism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
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  28. Peter J. Graham (2004). Metaphysical Libertarianism and the Epistemology of Testimony. American Philosophical Quarterly 41 (1):37-50.score: 30.0
    Reductionism about testimony holds that testimonial warrant or entitlement is just a species of inductive warrant. Anti-Reductionism holds that it is different from inductive but analogous to perceptual or memorial warrant. Perception receives much of its positive epistemic status from being reliably truthconducive in normal conditions. One reason to reject the epistemic analogy is that testimony involves agency – it goes through the will of the speaker – but perception does not. A speaker might always choose to lie or otherwise (...)
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  29. Peter J. Graham (1997). What is Testimony? Philosophical Quarterly 47 (187):227-232.score: 30.0
    C.A.J. Coady, in his book Testimony: A Philosophical Study (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992), offers conditions on an assertion that p to count as testimony. He claims that the assertion that p must be by a competent speaker directed to an audience in need of evidence and it must be evidence that p. I offer examples to show that Coady’s conditions are too strong. Testimony need not be evidence; the speaker need not be competent; and, the statement need not be relevant (...)
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  30. Peter A. Graham (2008). A Defense of Local Miracle Compatibilism. Philosophical Studies 140 (1):65 - 82.score: 30.0
    David Lewis has offered a reply to the standard argument for the claim that the truth of determinism is incompatible with anyone’s being able to do otherwise than she in fact does. Helen Beebee has argued that Lewis’s compatibilist strategy is untenable. In this paper I show that one recent attempt to defend Lewis’s view against this argument fails and then go on to offer my own defense of Lewis’s view.
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  31. George Graham (1990). Melancholic Epistemology. Synthese 82 (3):399-422.score: 30.0
    Too little attention has been paid by philosophers to the cognitive and epistemic dimensions of emotional disturbances such as depression, grief, and anxiety and to the possibility of justification or warrant for such conditions. The chief aim of the present paper is to help to remedy that deficiency with respect to depression. Taxonomy of depression reveals two distinct forms: depression (1) with intentionality and (2) without intentionality. Depression with intentionality can be justified or unjustified, warranted or unwarranted. I argue that (...)
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  32. Peter A. Graham (2008). The Standard Argument for Blame Incompatibilism. Noûs 42 (4):697-726.score: 30.0
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  33. George Graham (1999). Fuzzy Fault Lines: Selves in Multiple Personality Disorder. Philosophical Explorations 2 (3):159-174.score: 30.0
    This paper outlines a multidimensional conception of Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) that differs from the 'orthodox' conception in terms of the content of its commitment to the reality of the self. Unlike the orthodox conception it recognizes that selves are fuzzy entities. By appreciating the possibility that selves are fuzzy entities, it is possible to rebut a form of fictionalism about the self which appeals to clinical data from MPD. Realism about self can be preserved in the face of multiple (...)
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  34. Peter J. Graham (2010). Theorizing Justification. In Knowledge and Skepticism. MIT Press.score: 30.0
    The standard taxonomy of theories of epistemic justification generates four positions from the Foundationalism v. Coherentism and Internalism v. Externalism disputes. I develop a new taxonomy driven by two other distinctions: Fundamentalism v. Non-Fundamentalism and Actual-Result v. Proper-Aim conceptions of epistemic justification. Actual-Result theorists hold that a belief is justified only if, as an actual matter of fact, it is held or formed in a way that makes it more likely than not to be true. Proper-Aim theorists hold that a (...)
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  35. George Graham (1999). Mind, Brain, World. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (3):223-225.score: 30.0
  36. Daniel W. Graham (1987). The Paradox of Prime Matter. Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (4):475-490.score: 30.0
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  37. Peter J. Graham (2000). The Reliability of Testimony. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (3):695-709.score: 30.0
  38. George Graham & Terence E. Horgan (1994). Southern Fundamentalism and the End of Philosophy. Philosophical Issues 5:219-247.score: 30.0
  39. Peter J. Graham (2006). Liberal Fundamentalism and its Rivals. In Jennifer Lackey & Ernest Sosa (eds.), The Epistemology of Testimony. Oxford. 93--115.score: 30.0
    Many hold that perception is a source of epistemically basic (direct) belief: for justification, perceptual beliefs do not need positive inferential support from other justified beliefs, especially from beliefs about one’s current sensory episodes. Perceptual beliefs can, however, be defeated or undermined by other things one believes, and so to be justified in the end there must be no undefeated undermining grounds. Similarly for memory and introspection.1..
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  40. George Graham & J. Neisser (2000). Probing for Relevance: What Metacognition Tells Us About the Power of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):172-177.score: 30.0
    Metacognitive attitudes can affect behavior but do they do so, as Koriat claims, because they enhance voluntary control? This Commentary makes a case for saying that metacognitive consciousness may enhance not control but subjective predictability and may be best studied by examining not just healthy, well-integrated cognizers, but victims of multilevel mental disorders.
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  41. George Graham & Terence E. Horgan (2005). Mary Mary au Contraire: Reply to Raffman. Philosophical Studies 122 (2):203-12.score: 30.0
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  42. George Graham & Ralph Kennedy (2004). Review: Being No One: The Self-Model Theory of Subjectivity. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (450):369-372.score: 30.0
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  43. Timothy Backous & William C. Graham (eds.) (1997). Common Good, Uncommon Questions: A Primer in Moral Theology. Liturgical Press.score: 30.0
    Common Good, Uncommon Questions explores a variety of moral issues.
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  44. Terence E. Horgan & George Graham (1991). In Defense of Southern Fundamentalism. Philosophical Studies 62 (May):107-134.score: 30.0
  45. David Graham & Nathan Nobis (2007). Animals and Rights. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 8 (2).score: 30.0
  46. Gordon Graham (1994). Art, Pleasure, and Play. Journal of Value Inquiry 28 (2):217-232.score: 30.0
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  47. Gordon Graham (2002). Art and Knowledge. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (4):432-434.score: 30.0
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  48. Peter J. Graham (2007). Review of Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Moral Skepticisms. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (3).score: 30.0
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  49. Peter J. Graham (2007). The Theoretical Diagnosis of Skepticism. Synthese 158 (1):19 - 39.score: 30.0
    Radical skepticism about the external implies that no belief about the external is even prima facie justified. A theoretical reply to skepticism has four stages. First, show which theories of epistemic justification support skeptical doubts (show which theories, given other reasonable assumptions, entail skepticism). Second, show which theories undermine skeptical doubts (show which theories, given other reasonable assumptions, do not support the skeptic’s conclusion). Third, show which of the latter theories (which non-skeptical theory) is correct, and in so doing show (...)
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