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  1. Gordon Barnes, The Problem of Basic Deductive Inference.
    Knowledge can be transmitted by a valid deductive inference. If I know that p, and I know that if p then q, then I can infer that q, and I can thereby come to know that q. What feature of a valid deductive inference enables it to transmit knowledge? In some cases, it is a proof of validity that grounds the transmission of knowledge. If the subject can prove that her inference follows a valid rule, then her inference transmits knowledge. (...)
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  2. Matthew Davidson & Gordon Barnes (forthcoming). Internalism and Properly Basic Belief. In David Werther Mark Linville (ed.), Philosophy and the Christian Worldview : Analysis, Assessment and Development. Continuum.
    In this paper we set out a view on which internalist proper basicality is secured by sensory experience.
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  3. Gordon Barnes (2012). How to Be an Evidentialist About Belief in God. Philo 14 (1):25-31.
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  4. Gordon Barnes (2008). Justification Without Awareness - by Michael Bergmann. Philosophical Books 49 (2):163-164.
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  5. Gordon Barnes (2007). The Sins of Christian Orthodoxy. Philo 10 (2):93-113.
    Christian orthodoxy essentially involves the acceptance of the New Testament as authoritative in matters of faith and conduct. However, the New Testament instructs slaves and women to accept a subordinate status that denies their equality with other human beings. To accept such a status is to have the vice of servility, which involves denying the equality of all human beings. Therefore the New Testament asserts that slaves and women should deny their equality with other human beings. This is false. Moreover, (...)
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  6. Gordon Prescott Barnes (2007). Necessity and Apriority. Philosophical Studies 132 (3):495 - 523.
    The classical view of the relationship between necessity and apriority, defended by Leibniz and Kant, is that all necessary truths are known a priori. The classical view is now almost universally rejected, ever since Saul Kripke and Hilary Putnam discovered that there are necessary truths that are known only a posteriori. However, in recent years a new debate has emerged over the epistemology of these necessary a posteriori truths. According to one view – call it the neo-classical view – knowledge (...)
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  7. Gordon Barnes (2004). Is Dualism Religiously and Morally Pernicious? American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (1):99-106.
    In a recent address to the American Catholic Philosophical Association, Alfred Freddoso has claimed that dualism is both religiously and morally pernicious. He contends that dualism runs afoul of the Catholic teaching that the soul is the form of the body, and that dualism leaves the body with nothing more than instrumental moral worth. On the contrary, I argue that dualism per se is neither religiously nor morally pernicious. Dualism is compatible with a rich teleology of embodiment that will underwrite (...)
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  8. Gordon Barnes (2004). Mind, Metaphysics, and Value in the Thomistic and Analytical Traditions. Faith and Philosophy 21 (1):110-116.
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  9. Gordon Barnes (2003). Resurrecting Old-Fashioned Foundationalism. Philosophical Books 44 (1):53-62.
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  10. Gordon Barnes (2003). On Michael DePaul's (Ed.) Resurrecting Old-Fashioned Foundationalism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 44 (1):53-62.
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  11. Gordon P. Barnes (2003). 1 Introduction. Logos 6 (1).
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  12. Gordon P. Barnes (2003). The Paradoxes of Hylomorphism. Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):501 - 523.
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  13. Gordon Barnes (2002). Belief, Control, and Conclusive Reasons. Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (2):315-325.
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  14. Gordon Barnes (2002). Conceivability, Explanation, and Defeat. Philosophical Studies 108 (3):327 - 338.
    Christopher Hill and Joseph Levine have argued that the conceivabilities involved in anti-materialist arguments are defeated as evidence of possibility. Their strategy assumes the following principle: the conceivability of a state of affairs S constitutes evidence for the possibility of S only if the possibility of S is the best explanation of the conceivability of S. So if there is a better explanation of the conceivability of S than its possibility, then the conceivability of S is thereby defeated as evidence (...)
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  15. Gordon Barnes (2002). Hale's Necessity: It's Indispensable, But is It Real? Disputatio 13:3 - 10.
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  16. Gordon P. Barnes (2002). Resolving the Responsibilism Dilemma. The Monist 85 (3):415-420.
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  17. Gordon Barnes (2001). Should Property-Dualists Be Substance-Hylomorphists? Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:285-299.
    In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in property dualism—the view that some mental properties are neither identical with, nor strongly supervenient on, physical properties. One of the principal objections to this view is that, according to natural science, the physical world is a causally closed system. So if mental properties are really distinct from physical properties, then it would seem that mental properties never really cause anything that happens in the physical world. Thus, dualism threatens to (...)
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  18. Gordon Barnes (2000). Modal Inquiry: An Epistemological Study. Dissertation, University of Wisconsin, Madison
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