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  1. Gordon G. Globus (forthcoming). Connectionism and the Dreaming Mind. Journal of Mind and Behavior.
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  2. Gordon G. Globus (forthcoming). Existence and the Brain. Journal of Mind and Behavior.
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  3. Gordon G. Globus (2005). Nonlinear Dynamics at the Cutting Edge of Modernity: A Postmodern View. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (3):229-234.
  4. Gordon G. Globus, Karl H. Pribram & Giuseppe Vitiello (eds.) (2004). Brain and Being. John Benjamins.
  5. Gordon G. Globus (2003). Quantum Closures and Disclosures: Thinking-Together Postphenomenology and Quantum Brain Dynamics. John Benjamins.
    CHAPTER Heidegger and the Quantum Brain In any case the orientation to "I" and " consciousness" and re-presentation ...
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  6. Gordon G. Globus (2002). Ontological Implications of Quantum Brain Dynamics. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins. 33--137.
  7. Gordon G. Globus (1998). Self, Cognition, Qualia, and World in Quantum Brain Dynamics. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (1):34-52.
  8. Gordon G. Globus (1997). Nonlinear Brain Systems with Nonlocal Degrees of Freedom. Journal of Mind and Behavior 18 (2-3):195-204.
     
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  9. Gordon G. Globus (1996). Quantum Consciousness is Cybernetic. Psyche 2 (21).
  10. Gordon G. Globus (1994). Some Philosophical Implications of Dream Existence. Anthropology of Consciousness 5 (3):24-27.
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  11. Gordon G. Globus (1992). Derrida and Connectionism: Differance in Neural Nets. Philosophical Psychology 5 (2):183-97.
    A possible relation between Derrida's deconstruction of metaphysics and connectionism is explored by considering diff rance in neural nets terms. First diff rance , as the crossing of Saussurian difference and Freudian deferral, is modeled and then the fuller 'sheaf of diff rance is taken up. The metaphysically conceived brain has two versions: in the traditional computational version the brain processes information like a computer and in the connectionist version the brain computes input vector to output vector transformations non-symbolically. The (...)
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  12. Gordon G. Globus (1992). Toward a Noncomputational Cognitive Science. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 4:299-310.
     
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  13. Gordon G. Globus (1991). Deconstructing the Chinese Room. Journal of Mind and Behavior 12 (3):377-91.
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  14. Gordon G. Globus (1990). Heidegger and Cognitive Science. Philosophy Today 34 (1):20-29.
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  15. Gordon G. Globus (1989). The Strict Identity Theory of Schlick, Russell, Maxwell, and Feigl. In M. Maxwell & C. Wade Savage (eds.), Science, Mind, and Psychology: Essays in Honor of Grover Maxwell. University Press of America.
  16. Gordon G. Globus (1986). The Machine Basis for the Dasein: On the Prospects for an Existential Functionalism. [REVIEW] Man and World 19 (1):55-72.
    Heidegger has provided a profound account of human existence in terms of the to-be-da. Even though Heidegger disregarded its brain machine basis (and even though brain scientists disregard Heidegger), the issue of the Dasein's machine basis is raised by the empirically extremely well confirmed “supervenience” of the Dasein on the brain. Since the Turing machine will not do as basis for the Dasein, as Dreyfus has shown, contemporary functionalism cannot resolve the issue. Instead an “existential functionalism,” which looks to some (...)
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  17. Gordon G. Globus (1984). Can Methodological Solipsism Be Confined to Psychology? Cognition and Brain Theory 7:233-46.
  18. Gordon G. Globus (1982). Can Phenomenology Contribute to Brain Science? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):430.
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  19. Gordon G. Globus (1978). What is the Sound of One Hand Clapping, the Touch of a Still Wind, the Sight of a “Black Hole”? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):355.
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  20. Gordon G. Globus, Grover Maxwell & I. Savodnik (eds.) (1975). Consciousness and the Brain. Plenum Press.
  21. Gordon G. Globus (1974). The Problem of Consciousness. Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Science 3:40-69.
     
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  22. Gordon G. Globus (1972). Biological Foundations of the Psychoneural Identity. Philosophy of Science 39 (September):291-300.
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  23. Gordon G. Globus (1972). Biological Foundations of the Psychoneural Identity Hypothesis. Philosophy of Science 39 (3):291-301.
    Biological foundations of the psychoneural identity hypothesis are explicated and their implications discussed. "Consciousness per se" and phenomenal contents of consciousness per se are seen to be identical with events in the (unobserved) brain in accordance with Leibniz's Law, but only informationally equivalent to neural events as observed. Phenomenal content potentially is recoverable by empirical means from observed neural events, but the converse is not possible. Consciousness per se is identical with events which do not represent anything distal to sensory (...)
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