Search results for 'Gordon Prescott Barnes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gordon Prescott Barnes (2007). Necessity and Apriority. Philosophical Studies 132 (3):495 - 523.score: 870.0
    The classical view of the relationship between necessity and apriority, defended by Leibniz and Kant, is that all necessary truths are known a priori. The classical view is now almost universally rejected, ever since Saul Kripke and Hilary Putnam discovered that there are necessary truths that are known only a posteriori. However, in recent years a new debate has emerged over the epistemology of these necessary a posteriori truths. According to one view – call it the neo-classical view – knowledge (...)
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  2. Gordon Barnes, The Problem of Basic Deductive Inference.score: 240.0
    Knowledge can be transmitted by a valid deductive inference. If I know that p, and I know that if p then q, then I can infer that q, and I can thereby come to know that q. What feature of a valid deductive inference enables it to transmit knowledge? In some cases, it is a proof of validity that grounds the transmission of knowledge. If the subject can prove that her inference follows a valid rule, then her inference transmits knowledge. (...)
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  3. Matthew Davidson & Gordon Barnes (forthcoming). Internalism and Properly Basic Belief. In David Werther Mark Linville (ed.), Philosophy and the Christian Worldview : Analysis, Assessment and Development. Continuum.score: 240.0
    In this paper we set out a view on which internalist proper basicality is secured by sensory experience.
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  4. Gordon P. Barnes (2003). The Paradoxes of Hylomorphism. Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):501 - 523.score: 240.0
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  5. Gordon Barnes (2001). Should Property-Dualists Be Substance-Hylomorphists? Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:285-299.score: 240.0
    In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in property dualism—the view that some mental properties are neither identical with, nor strongly supervenient on, physical properties. One of the principal objections to this view is that, according to natural science, the physical world is a causally closed system. So if mental properties are really distinct from physical properties, then it would seem that mental properties never really cause anything that happens in the physical world. Thus, dualism threatens to (...)
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  6. Gordon Barnes (2002). Belief, Control, and Conclusive Reasons. Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (2):315-325.score: 240.0
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  7. Gordon Barnes (2003). On Michael DePaul's (Ed.) Resurrecting Old-Fashioned Foundationalism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 44 (1):53-62.score: 240.0
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  8. Gordon Barnes (2008). Justification Without Awareness - by Michael Bergmann. Philosophical Books 49 (2):163-164.score: 240.0
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  9. Gordon Barnes (2004). Is Dualism Religiously and Morally Pernicious? American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (1):99-106.score: 240.0
    In a recent address to the American Catholic Philosophical Association, Alfred Freddoso has claimed that dualism is both religiously and morally pernicious. He contends that dualism runs afoul of the Catholic teaching that the soul is the form of the body, and that dualism leaves the body with nothing more than instrumental moral worth. On the contrary, I argue that dualism per se is neither religiously nor morally pernicious. Dualism is compatible with a rich teleology of embodiment that will underwrite (...)
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  10. Gordon Barnes (2007). The Sins of Christian Orthodoxy. Philo 10 (2):93-113.score: 240.0
    Christian orthodoxy essentially involves the acceptance of the New Testament as authoritative in matters of faith and conduct. However, the New Testament instructs slaves and women to accept a subordinate status that denies their equality with other human beings. To accept such a status is to have the vice of servility, which involves denying the equality of all human beings. Therefore the New Testament asserts that slaves and women should deny their equality with other human beings. This is false. Moreover, (...)
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  11. Gordon Barnes (2004). Mind, Metaphysics, and Value in the Thomistic and Analytical Traditions. Faith and Philosophy 21 (1):110-116.score: 240.0
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  12. Gordon Barnes (2002). Conceivability, Explanation, and Defeat. Philosophical Studies 108 (3):327 - 338.score: 240.0
    Christopher Hill and Joseph Levine have argued that the conceivabilities involved in anti-materialist arguments are defeated as evidence of possibility. Their strategy assumes the following principle: the conceivability of a state of affairs S constitutes evidence for the possibility of S only if the possibility of S is the best explanation of the conceivability of S. So if there is a better explanation of the conceivability of S than its possibility, then the conceivability of S is thereby defeated as evidence (...)
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  13. Gordon Barnes (2012). How to Be an Evidentialist About Belief in God. Philo 14 (1):25-31.score: 240.0
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  14. Gordon Barnes (2002). Hale's Necessity: It's Indispensable, But is It Real? Disputatio 13:3 - 10.score: 240.0
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  15. Gordon Barnes (2003). Resurrecting Old-Fashioned Foundationalism. Philosophical Books 44 (1):53-62.score: 240.0
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  16. Gordon P. Barnes (2002). Resolving the Responsibilism Dilemma. The Monist 85 (3):415-420.score: 240.0
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  17. Gordon P. Barnes (2003). 1 Introduction. Logos 6 (1).score: 240.0
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  18. Gordon Barnes (2000). Modal Inquiry: An Epistemological Study. Dissertation, University of Wisconsin, Madisonscore: 240.0
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  19. Jonathan Barnes, Benjamin Morison & Katerina Ierodiakonou (eds.) (2011). Episteme, Etc.: Essays in Honour of Jonathan Barnes. Oxford University Press.score: 210.0
    Sixteen authors, including some of the most distinguished scholars of our time, present essays which together reflect the impressive scope of Jonathan Barnes's contributions to philosophy, and in particular to the study of ancient philosophy. Six are on knowledge, five on logic and metaphysics, five on ethics.
     
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  20. Robert Gordon, Autism and the "Theory of Mind" Debate Robert M. Gordon and John A. Barker.score: 180.0
    With this understanding, children are better able to anticipate the behavior of others and to attune their own behavior accordingly. In mentally retarded children with Down's syndrome, attainment of such competence is delayed, but it is generally acquired by the time they reach the mental age of 4, as measured by tests of nonverbal intelligence. Thus from a developmental perspective, attainment of the mental age of 4 appears to be of profound significance for acquisition of what we shall call psychological (...)
     
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  21. Edwin Gordon (1997). Edwin Gordon Responds. Philosophy of Music Education Review 5 (1).score: 180.0
     
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  22. Michael Hector Storck (2008). Parts, Wholes, and Presence by Power A Response to Gordon P. Barnes. Review of Metaphysics 62 (1):45-59.score: 168.0
    Gordon P. Barnes has recently argued that presence by power is inadequate as an explanation of the way elements are present in complex bodies, and that it would be better to explain the elements’ presence by claiming that simpler substances—carbon atoms, for example—are actually and substantially present in living things. In order to address his arguments, this paper begins by briefly presenting St. Thomas’s understanding of presence by power, and then argues that Barnes’s proposal—that there is a (...)
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  23. S. Olsaretti (2013). Coercion and Libertarianism: A Reply to Gordon Barnes. Analysis 73 (2):295-299.score: 144.0
    Libertarians oppose coercion and champion a free-market society. Are these two commitments, as libertarians claim, wholly consistent with one another, or is there, by contrast, a tension between them? This paper defends the latter view. Replying to an article by Gordon Barnes, the paper casts doubts on the success of an argument aimed at establishing that, while coercion is justice-disrupting, all non-coercive but forced transactions that occur in a free market are justice-preserving.
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  24. Frederick C. Copleston (1971). Gordon Leff. Heresy in the Later Middle Ages. The Relation of Heterodoxy to Dissent C. 1250–C. 1450. 2 Vols. Pp. X + 800 (Manchester University Press: New York, Barnes and Noble, 1967). 90s. The Set. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 7 (1):79.score: 120.0
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  25. Robert M. Gordon (1992). The Simulation Theory: Objections and Misconceptions. Mind and Language 7 (1-2):11-34.score: 90.0
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  26. Jonathan Barnes (2007/2009). Truth, Etc.: Six Lectures on Ancient Logic. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Truth, etc. is a wide-ranging study of ancient logic based upon the John Locke lectures given by the eminent philosopher Jonathan Barnes in Oxford. The book presupposes no knowledge of logic and no skill in ancient languages: all ancient texts are cited in English translation; and logical symbols and logical jargon are avoided so far as possible. Anyone interested in ancient philosophy, or in logic and its history, will find much to learn and enjoy here.
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  27. Lewis R. Gordon (ed.) (1997). Existence in Black: An Anthology of Black Existential Philosophy. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Existence in Black is the first collective statement on the subject of Africana Philosophy of Existence. Drawing upon resources in Africana philosophy and literature, the contributors explore some of the central themes of Existentialism as posed by the context of what Frantz Fanon has identified as "the lived-experience of the black." Among questions posed and explored in the volume are: What is to be done in a world of near universal sense of superiority to, if not universal hatred of, black (...)
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  28. Jonathan Barnes (1990). The Toils of Scepticism. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In the works of Sextus Empiricus, scepticism is presented in its most elaborate and challenging form. This book investigates - both from an exegetical and from a philosophical point of view - the chief argumentative forms which ancient scepticism developed. Thus the particular focus is on the Agrippan aspect of Sextus' Pyrrhonism. Barnes gives a lucid explanation and analysis of these arguments, both individually and as constituent parts of a sceptical system. For, taken together, these forms amount to a (...)
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  29. Jonathan Barnes (2001). Early Greek Philosophy. Penguin Books.score: 60.0
    This anthology looks at the early sages of Western philosophy and science who paved the way for Plato and Aristotle and their successors. Democritus's atomic theory of matter, Zeno's dazzling "proofs" that motion is impossible, Pythagorean insights into mathematics, Heraclitus's haunting and enigmatic epigrams-all form part of a revolution in human thought that relied on reasoning, forged the first scientific vocabulary, and laid the foundations of Western philosophy. Jonathan Barnes has painstakingly brought together the surviving Presocratic fragments in their (...)
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  30. Annette Barnes (1997). Seeing Through Self-Deception. New York: Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    What is it to deceive someone? And how is it possible to deceive oneself? Does self-deception require that people be taken in by a deceitful strategy that they know is deceitful? The literature is divided between those who argue that self-deception is intentional and those who argue that it is non-intentional. In this study, Annette Barnes offers a challenge to both the standard characterisation of other-deception and current characterizations of self-deception, examining the available explanations and exploring such questions as (...)
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  31. Stephen Barnes (2002). Teaching Plato's Cave. Questions: Philosophy for Young People 2:6-7.score: 60.0
    Barnes focuses and examines Plato’s ideals on life through “Allegory of the Cave”. The nature of selfhood, moral/ political issues, and enlightenment demonstrate in any classroom the alternatives to a dry session on philosophy to young children through an engaging discussion.
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  32. Robert M. Gordon (1987). The Structure of Emotions: Investigations in Cognitive Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    The Structure of Emotions argues that emotion concepts should have a much more important role in the social and behavioural sciences than they now enjoy, and shows that certain influential psychological theories of emotions overlook the explanatory power of our emotion concepts. Professor Gordon also outlines a new account of the nature of commonsense (or ‘folk’) psychology in general.
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  33. Lewis R. Gordon (2008). An Introduction to Africana Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In this undergraduate textbook Lewis R. Gordon offers the first comprehensive treatment of Africana philosophy, beginning with the emergence of an Africana (i.e. African diasporic) consciousness in the Afro-Arabic world of the Middle Ages. He argues that much of modern thought emerged out of early conflicts between Islam and Christianity that culminated in the expulsion of the Moors from the Iberian Peninsula, and from the subsequent expansion of racism, enslavement, and colonialism which in their turn stimulated reflections on reason, (...)
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  34. Eric Barnes (1995). Truthlikeness, Translation, and Approximate Causal Explanation. Philosophy of Science 62 (2):215-226.score: 60.0
    D. Miller's demonstrations of the language dependence of truthlikeness raise a profound problem for the claim that scientific progress is objective. In two recent papers (Barnes 1990, 1991) I argue that the objectivity of progress may be grounded on the claim that the aim of science is not merely truth but knowledge; progress thus construed is objective in an epistemic sense. In this paper I construct a new solution to Miller's problem grounded on the notion of "approximate causal explanation" (...)
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  35. Barry Barnes (2000). Understanding Agency: Social Theory and Responsible Action. Sage.score: 60.0
    Is human freedom and choice exaggerated in recent social theory? Should agency be the central in sociology? In this, penetrating and assured book, one of the leading commentators in the field asks where social theory is going. Barnes argues that social theory has taken the wrong turn in over-stating individual freedom. The result is that social contexts in which all individual actions are situated, is dangerously under-theorized. Barnes calls for a form of social theory that recognizes that sociability (...)
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  36. Mordechai Gordon (2011). Listening as Embracing the Other: Martin Buber's Philosophy of Dialogue. Educational Theory 61 (2):207-219.score: 60.0
    In this essay, Mordechai Gordon interprets Martin Buber's ideas on dialogue, presence, and especially his notion of embracing in an attempt to shed some light on Buber's understanding of listening. Gordon argues that in order to understand Buber's conception of listening, one needs to examine this concept in the context of his philosophy of dialogue. More specifically, his contention is that closely examining Buber's notion of embracing the other is critical to making sense of his conception of listening. (...)
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  37. Jonathan Barnes (2000). Aristotle: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The influence of Aristotle, the prince of philosophers, on the intellectual history of the West is second to none. In this book, Jonathan Barnes examines Aristotle's scientific researches, his discoveries in logic and his metaphysical theories, his work in psychology and in ethics and politics, and his ideas about art and poetry, placing his teachings in their historical context.
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  38. Lewis R. Gordon (2000). Existentia Africana: Understanding Africana Existential Thought. Routledge.score: 60.0
    The intellectual history of the last quarter of this century has been marked by the growing influence of Africana thought--an area of philosophy that focuses on issues raised by the struggle over ideas in African cultures and their hybrid forms in Europe, the Americas, and the Caribbean. Existentia Africana is an engaging and highly readable introduction to the field of Africana philosophy and will help to define this rapidly growing field. Lewis R. Gordon clearly explains Africana existential thought to (...)
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  39. Lewis Gordon (1995). Fanon and the Crisis of European Man: An Essay on Philosophy and the Human Sciences. Routledge.score: 60.0
    As the first book to analyze the work of Fanon as an existential-phenomenological of human sciences and liberation philosopher, Gordon deploys Fanon's work to illuminate how the "bad faith" of European science and civilization have philosophically stymied the project of liberation. Fanon's body of work serves as a critique of European science and society, and shows the ways in which the project of "truth" is compromised by Eurocentric artificially narrowed scope of humanity--a circumstance to which he refers as the (...)
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  40. Jonathan Barnes (2012). Logical Matters. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    This volume presents 27 essays on logic in ancient philosophy by Jonathan Barnes, one of the most admired philosophers of his generation.
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  41. Jonathan Barnes (ed.) (2003). Porphyry's Introduction. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    The Introduction to philosophy written by Porphyry at the end of the second century AD is the most successful work of its kind ever to have been published. It was translated into most respectable languages, and for a millennium and a half every student of philosophy read it as his first text in the subject. Porphyry's aim was modest: he intended to explain the meaning of five terms, 'genus', 'species', 'difference', 'property', and 'accident' - terms which he took to be (...)
     
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  42. Jonathan Barnes (2014). Proof, Knowledge, and Scepticism: Essays in Ancient Philosophy Iii. Oup Oxford.score: 60.0
    Proof, Knowledge, and Scepticism is the third volume of Jonathan Barnes' papers on ancient philosophy. It contains twenty-two pieces on epistemological matters, some of them revised, and one or two which appear for the first time in English. Anyone with an interest in ancient philosophy will find them enriching and amusing.
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  43. Rebecca Gordon (2014). Mainstreaming Torture: Ethical Approaches in the Post-9/11 United States. Oup Usa.score: 60.0
    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 reopened what many Americans had assumed was a settled ethical question: Is torture ever morally permissible? Rebecca Gordon argues that institutionalized state torture remains as wrong today as it was before those terrible attacks, and shows how U.S. practices during the ''war on terror'' are rooted in a history that includes support for torture regimes abroad and for the use of torture in the jails and prisons of this country.
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  44. Gordon Daniel Marino (1984). An Analysis and Assessment of a Fragment From Jonathan Barnes's Reading of Heraclitus. Apeiron 18 (2):77 - 89.score: 36.0
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  45. J. Robert G. Williams & Elizabeth Barnes (2011). A Theory of Metaphysical Indeterminacy. In Karen Bennett & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics volume 6. Oxford University Press. 103-148.score: 30.0
    If the world itself is metaphysically indeterminate in a specified respect, what follows? In this paper, we develop a theory of metaphysical indeterminacy answering this question.
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  46. Robert M. Gordon (1986). Folk Psychology as Simulation. Mind and Language 1 (2):158-71.score: 30.0
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  47. Robert M. Gordon & Joe Cruz (2002). Simulation Theory. In L. Nagel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.score: 30.0
    What is the simulation theory? Arguments for simulation theory Simulation theory versus theory theory Simulation theory and cognitive science Versions of simulation theory A possible test of the simulation theory.
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  48. E. C. Barnes (2002). The Miraculous Choice Argument for Realism. Philosophical Studies 111 (2):97 - 120.score: 30.0
    The miracle argument for scientific realism can be cast in two forms: according to the miraculous theory argument, realism is the only position which does not make the empirical successes of particular theories miraculous. According to the miraculous choice argument, realism is the only position which does not render the fact that empirically successful theories have been chosen a miracle. A vast literature discusses the miraculous theory argument, but the miraculous choice argument has been unjustifiably neglected. I raise two objections (...)
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  49. Jonathan Barnes (2006). Belief is Up to Us. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (2):187–204.score: 30.0
    Augustine has an argument which goes like this: (1) Belief is assent; (2) Assent is up to us: therefore (3) Belief is up to us. The conclusion is-or was thought to be-a doctrine essential to Christian eschatology. The two premisses come from pagan philosophy. Sections I-II set out the argument and its background. Section III is theological. Section IV looks at the conclusion, with the help of Aristotle, while section V and VI look at the premisses. The last three sections (...)
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  50. Jeffrey Gordon (1984). Nagel or Camus on the Absurd? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 45 (1):15-28.score: 30.0
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