Search results for 'Gordon Sinclair Jury' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gordon Sinclair Jury (1937). Value and Ethical Objectivity: A Study in Ethical Objectivity and the Objectivity of Value. London, G. Allen & Unwin, Ltd..score: 290.0
    November 1936 PREFACE THIS book is, in slightly revised form, a dis sertation presented for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Yale University.
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  2. Robert Gordon, Autism and the "Theory of Mind" Debate Robert M. Gordon and John A. Barker.score: 120.0
    With this understanding, children are better able to anticipate the behavior of others and to attune their own behavior accordingly. In mentally retarded children with Down's syndrome, attainment of such competence is delayed, but it is generally acquired by the time they reach the mental age of 4, as measured by tests of nonverbal intelligence. Thus from a developmental perspective, attainment of the mental age of 4 appears to be of profound significance for acquisition of what we shall call psychological (...)
     
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  3. Edwin Gordon (1997). Edwin Gordon Responds. Philosophy of Music Education Review 5 (1).score: 120.0
     
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  4. Robert M. Gordon (1992). The Simulation Theory: Objections and Misconceptions. Mind and Language 7 (1-2):11-34.score: 90.0
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  5. Lewis R. Gordon (ed.) (1997). Existence in Black: An Anthology of Black Existential Philosophy. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Existence in Black is the first collective statement on the subject of Africana Philosophy of Existence. Drawing upon resources in Africana philosophy and literature, the contributors explore some of the central themes of Existentialism as posed by the context of what Frantz Fanon has identified as "the lived-experience of the black." Among questions posed and explored in the volume are: What is to be done in a world of near universal sense of superiority to, if not universal hatred of, black (...)
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  6. Robert M. Gordon (1987). The Structure of Emotions: Investigations in Cognitive Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    The Structure of Emotions argues that emotion concepts should have a much more important role in the social and behavioural sciences than they now enjoy, and shows that certain influential psychological theories of emotions overlook the explanatory power of our emotion concepts. Professor Gordon also outlines a new account of the nature of commonsense (or ‘folk’) psychology in general.
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  7. Lewis R. Gordon (2008). An Introduction to Africana Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In this undergraduate textbook Lewis R. Gordon offers the first comprehensive treatment of Africana philosophy, beginning with the emergence of an Africana (i.e. African diasporic) consciousness in the Afro-Arabic world of the Middle Ages. He argues that much of modern thought emerged out of early conflicts between Islam and Christianity that culminated in the expulsion of the Moors from the Iberian Peninsula, and from the subsequent expansion of racism, enslavement, and colonialism which in their turn stimulated reflections on reason, (...)
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  8. Mordechai Gordon (2011). Listening as Embracing the Other: Martin Buber's Philosophy of Dialogue. Educational Theory 61 (2):207-219.score: 60.0
    In this essay, Mordechai Gordon interprets Martin Buber's ideas on dialogue, presence, and especially his notion of embracing in an attempt to shed some light on Buber's understanding of listening. Gordon argues that in order to understand Buber's conception of listening, one needs to examine this concept in the context of his philosophy of dialogue. More specifically, his contention is that closely examining Buber's notion of embracing the other is critical to making sense of his conception of listening. (...)
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  9. Lewis R. Gordon (2000). Existentia Africana: Understanding Africana Existential Thought. Routledge.score: 60.0
    The intellectual history of the last quarter of this century has been marked by the growing influence of Africana thought--an area of philosophy that focuses on issues raised by the struggle over ideas in African cultures and their hybrid forms in Europe, the Americas, and the Caribbean. Existentia Africana is an engaging and highly readable introduction to the field of Africana philosophy and will help to define this rapidly growing field. Lewis R. Gordon clearly explains Africana existential thought to (...)
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  10. Lewis Gordon (1995). Fanon and the Crisis of European Man: An Essay on Philosophy and the Human Sciences. Routledge.score: 60.0
    As the first book to analyze the work of Fanon as an existential-phenomenological of human sciences and liberation philosopher, Gordon deploys Fanon's work to illuminate how the "bad faith" of European science and civilization have philosophically stymied the project of liberation. Fanon's body of work serves as a critique of European science and society, and shows the ways in which the project of "truth" is compromised by Eurocentric artificially narrowed scope of humanity--a circumstance to which he refers as the (...)
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  11. Daniel B. Sinclair (2003). Jewish Biomedical Law: Legal and Extra-Legal Dimensions. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    Jewish Biomedical Law deals with the controversial issues of abortion, assisted reproduction, genetics, the obligation to heal, patient autonomy, treatment of the terminally ill, the definition of death, organ donations, and the allocation of scarce medical resources in Jewish Law. -/- The volume focuses upon the complex interplay between legal and moral elements in the decision-making process, particularly when questions of life and death (such as abortion and treatment of the terminally ill) are involved. Sinclair argues that the moral (...)
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  12. Upton Beall Sinclair (1922/1934). The Book of Life. London, T. W. Laurie.score: 60.0
    Upton Sinclair, one of America's foremost and most prolific authors, addresses the cultivation of the mind and the body in this 1922 volume.
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  13. W. D. Ross (1938). Value and Ethical Objectivity: A Study in Ethical Objectivity and the Objectivi of Value. By Gordon S. Jury. (London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. Pp. 258. Price 7s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 13 (49):105-.score: 42.0
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  14. Robert M. Gordon (1986). Folk Psychology as Simulation. Mind and Language 1 (2):158-71.score: 30.0
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  15. Robert M. Gordon & Joe Cruz (2002). Simulation Theory. In L. Nagel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.score: 30.0
    What is the simulation theory? Arguments for simulation theory Simulation theory versus theory theory Simulation theory and cognitive science Versions of simulation theory A possible test of the simulation theory.
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  16. Neil Sinclair (2006). Two Kinds of Naturalism in Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (4):417 - 439.score: 30.0
    What are the conditions on a successful naturalistic account of moral properties? In this paper I discuss one such condition: the possibility of moral concepts playing a role in good empirical theories on a par with those of the natural and social sciences. I argue that Peter Railton’s influential account of moral rightness fails to meet this condition, and thus is only viable in the hands of a naturalist who doesn’t insist on it. This conclusion generalises to all versions of (...)
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  17. Jeffrey Gordon (1984). Nagel or Camus on the Absurd? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 45 (1):15-28.score: 30.0
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  18. Neil Sinclair (2006). The Moral Belief Problem. Ratio 19 (2):249–260.score: 30.0
    The moral belief problem is that of reconciling expressivism in ethics with both minimalism in the philosophy of language and the syntactic discipline of moral sentences. It is argued that the problem can be solved by distinguishing minimal and robust senses of belief, where a minimal belief is any state of mind expressed by sincere assertoric use of a syntactically disciplined sentence and a robust belief is a minimal belief with some additional property R. Two attempts to specify R are (...)
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  19. Robert M. Gordon, Folk Psychology As Mental Simulation. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    by, or is otherwise relevant to the seminar "Folk Psychology vs. Mental Simulation: How Minds Understand Minds," a National.
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  20. Neil Sinclair (2007). Propositional Clothing and Belief. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (228):342-362.score: 30.0
    Moral discourse is propositionally clothed, that is, it exhibits those features – such as the ability of its sentences to intelligibly embed in conditionals and other unasserted contexts – that have been taken by some philosophers to be constitutive of discourses that express propositions. If there is nothing more to a mental state being a belief than it being characteristically expressed by sentences that are propositionally clothed then the version of expressivism which accepts that moral discourse is propositionally clothed (‘quasi-realism’) (...)
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  21. Robert Sinclair (2002). What is Radical Interpretation? Davidson, Fodor, and the Naturalization of Philosophy. Inquiry 45 (2):161-184.score: 30.0
    Jerry Fodor and Ernest Lepore have recently criticized Davidson's methodology of radical interpretation because of its apparent failure to reflect how actual interpretation is achieved. Responding to such complaints, Davidson claims that he is not interested in the empirical issues surrounding actual interpretation but instead focuses on the question of what conditions make interpretation possible. It is argued that this exchange between Fodor and Lepore on one side, and Davidson on the other, cannot be viewed simply as a naturalist reaction (...)
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  22. Robert M. Gordon (2007). Ascent Routines for Propositional Attitudes. Synthese 159 (2):151 - 165.score: 30.0
    An ascent routine (AR) allows a speaker to self-ascribe a given propositional attitude (PA) by redeploying the process that generates a corresponding lower level utterance. Thus, we may report on our beliefs about the weather by reporting (under certain constraints) on the weather. The chief criticism of my AR account of self-ascription, by Alvin Goldman and others, is that it covers few if any PA’s other than belief and offers no account of how we can attain reliability in identifying our (...)
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  23. Amanda Sinclair (1993). Approaches to Organisational Culture and Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 12 (1):63 - 73.score: 30.0
    This paper assesses the potential of organisational culture as a means for improving ethics in organisations. Organisational culture is recognised as one determinant of how people behave, more or less ethically, in organisations. It is also incresingly understood as an attribute that management can and should influence to improve organisational performance. When things go wrong in organisations, managers look to the culture as both the source of problems and the basis for solutions. Two models of organisational culture and ethical behaviour (...)
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  24. Craig D. Murray & Michael S. Gordon (2001). Changes in Bodily Awareness Induced by Immersive Virtual Reality. CyberPsychology and Behavior 4 (3):365-371.score: 30.0
  25. Robert M. Gordon (1996). Sympathy, Simulation, and the Impartial Spectator. In L. May, Michael Friedman & A. Clark (eds.), Mind and Morals: Essays on Ethics and Cognitive Science. MIT Press. 727-742.score: 30.0
  26. Jeffrey Gordon (1997). Kurosawa's Existential Masterpiece: A Mediation on the Meaning of Life. [REVIEW] Human Studies 20 (2):137-151.score: 30.0
    In the first part of the paper, I try to clarify the cluster of moods and questions we refer to generically as the problem of the meaning of life. I propose that the question of meaning emerges when we perform a spontaneous transcendental reduction on the phenomenon my life, a reduction that leaves us confronting an unjustified and unjustifiable curiosity. In Part 2, I turn to the film ikiru, Kurosawa''s masterpiece of 1952, for an existentialist resolution of the problem.
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  27. Robert Gordon, Consciousness, Folk Psychology, and Cognitive Science.score: 30.0
    This paper supports the basic integrity of the folk psychological conception of consciousness and its importance in cognitive theorizing. Section 1 critically examines some proposed definitions of consciousness, and argues that the folk- psychological notion of phenomenal consciousness is not captured by various functional-relational definitions. Section 2 rebuts the arguments of several writers who challenge the very existence of phenomenal consciousness, or the coherence or tenability of the folk-psychological notion of awareness. Section 3 defends a significant role for phenomenal consciousness (...)
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  28. Robert M. Gordon (1995). Sympathy, Simulation, and the Impartial Spectator. Ethics 105 (4):727-742.score: 30.0
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  29. Joy Gordon (1999). A Peaceful, Silent, Deadly Remedy: The Ethics of Economic Sanctions. Ethics and International Affairs 13 (1):123–142.score: 30.0
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  30. David Gordon (1984). Is the Prisoner's Dilemma an Insoluble Problem? Mind 93 (369):98-100.score: 30.0
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  31. Robert M. Gordon (1969). Emotions and Knowledge. Journal of Philosophy 66 (July):408-413.score: 30.0
  32. Terrence Guay, Jonathan P. Doh & Graham Sinclair (2004). Non-Governmental Organizations, Shareholder Activism, and Socially Responsible Investments: Ethical, Strategic, and Governance Implications. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 52 (1):125-139.score: 30.0
    In this article, we document the growing influence of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the realm of socially responsible investing (SRI). Drawing from ethical and economic perspectives on stakeholder management and agency theory, we develop a framework to understand how and when NGOs will be most influential in shaping the ethical and social responsibility orientations of business using the emergence of SRI as the primary influencing vehicle. We find that NGOs have opportunities to influence corporate conduct via direct, indirect, and interactive (...)
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  33. Robert M. Gordon (1986). The Passivity of Emotions. Philosophical Review 95 (July):339-60.score: 30.0
  34. Lewis R. Gordon (2008). Not Always Enslaved, yet Not Quite Free: Philosophical Challenges From the Underside of the New World. Philosophia 36 (2):151-166.score: 30.0
    This article is the keynote address of the University of the West Indies at Cave Hill, Barbados, philosophy symposium in celebration of the 200th Anniversary of the British outlawing the Atlantic Slave Trade. The paper explores questions of enslavement and freedom through challenges of philosophical anthropology, philosophy of social change, and metacritical reflections posed by African Diasporic or Africana philosophy. Such challenges include the relevance and legitimacy of philosophical reflection to the lives of racialized slaves and concludes with a discussion (...)
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  35. David Gordon (1984). Special Relativity and the Location of Mental Events. Analysis 44 (June):126-127.score: 30.0
  36. Robert M. Gordon (1973). Judgmental Emotions. Analysis 34 (December):40-48.score: 30.0
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  37. Denis Cormier, Irene M. Gordon & Michel Magnan (2004). Corporate Environmental Disclosure: Contrasting Management's Perceptions with Reality. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 49 (2):143-165.score: 30.0
    This paper's purpose is to assess how management's perceptions regarding certain aspects of environmental reporting relate to the firm's actual reporting strategy. Toward that end, we propose a model where a firm's environmental disclosure is conditional upon executive assessments of corporate concerns. The study relies on a survey that was sent to environmental management executives from European and North American multinational firms enquiring about the determinants of corporate environmental disclosure. Responses from these executives were then contrasted with their firms' actual (...)
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  38. Malcolm S. Gordon (1999). The Concept of Monophyly: A Speculative Essay. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 14 (3):331-348.score: 30.0
    The concept of monophyly is central to much of modern biology. Despite many efforts over many years, important questions remain unanswered that relate both to the concept itself and to its various applications. This essay focuses primarily on four of these: i) Is it possible to define monophyly operationally, specifically with respect to both the structures of genomes and at the levels of the highest phylogenetic categories (kingdoms, phyla, classes)? ii) May the mosaic and chimeric structures of genomes be sufficiently (...)
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  39. Neve Gordon (2002). On Visibility and Power: An Arendtian Corrective of Foucault. [REVIEW] Human Studies 25 (2):125-145.score: 30.0
    Freedom, conceived ontologically, is power's condition of possibility. Yet, considering that the subject's interests and identity are constantly shaped, one still has to explain how – theoretically speaking – individuals can resist control. This is precisely the issue I address in the following pages. Following a brief overview of Foucault's contribution to our understanding of power, I turn to discuss the role of visibility vis-à-vis control, and show how the development of disciplinary techniques reversed the visibility of power. While Foucault (...)
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  40. John-Stewart Gordon, Moral Egalitarianism. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
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  41. Bruce L. Gordon (2002). Maxwell–Boltzmann Statistics and the Metaphysics of Modality. Synthese 133 (3):393 - 417.score: 30.0
    Two arguments have recently been advanced that Maxwell-Boltzmann particles areindistinguishable just like Bose–Einstein and Fermi–Dirac particles. Bringing modalmetaphysics to bear on these arguments shows that ontological indistinguishabilityfor classical (MB) particles does not follow. The first argument, resting on symmetryin the occupation representation for all three cases, fails since peculiar correlationsexist in the quantum (BE and FD) context as harbingers of ontic indistinguishability,while the indistinguishability of classical particles remains purely epistemic. The secondargument, deriving from the classical limits of quantum statistical partition (...)
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  42. Robert M. Gordon (1980). Fear. Philosophical Review 89 (4):560-578.score: 30.0
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  43. David Gordon (1982). The Concept of the Hidden Curriculum. Journal of Philosophy of Education 16 (2):187–198.score: 30.0
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  44. J. Panksepp & N. Gordon (2003). The Instinctual Basis of Human Affect: Affective Imaging of Laughter and Crying. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):197-205.score: 30.0
    The goal of this study was to evaluate affective changes induced during mental imaging of instinctual action patterns. Subjects were first trained to simulate the bodily rhythms of laughter and crying and were then trained to image these processes without any movement. The mere imagination of the motor imagery of laughter and crying were sufficient to significantly facilitate happy and sad mood ratings as monitored by subjective self-report. In contrast, no changes in mood were reported while imaging the affectively neutral (...)
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  45. Kathryn Gordon & Maiko Miyake (2001). Business Approaches to Combating Bribery: A Study of Codes of Conduct. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 34 (3-4):161 - 173.score: 30.0
    The question of what firms do internally in the fight against bribery is probably as important to the successful outcome of that fight as formal anti-bribery law and enforcement. This paper looks at corporate approaches to anti-bribery commitment and compliance management using an inventory of 246 codes of conduct. It suggests that, while bribery is often mentioned in the codes of conduct, there is considerable diversity in the language and concepts adopted in anti-bribery commitments. This diversity is a feature of (...)
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  46. Daniel Gordon (1999). Capital Punishment for Murderous Theorists? History and Theory 38 (3):378–388.score: 30.0
  47. Haim Gordon (1980). Nietzsche's Zarathustra as Educator. Journal of Philosophy of Education 14 (2):181–192.score: 30.0
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  48. Peter Eli Gordon (2008). Neo-Kantianism and the Politics of Enlightenment. Philosophical Forum 39 (2):223-238.score: 30.0
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  49. Rivca Gordon (2006). Let's Get Rid of Motivation: Sartre's Wisdom. Sartre Studies International 12 (1):59-72.score: 30.0
    Jean-Paul Sartre is probably the only existentialist who describes in detail, mainly in Being and Nothingness, the problems arising from the concept of 'motivation'. More precisely, Sartre describes a group of notions - motivation is one of them - that reveal the same basic ontological problem. Like these other notions, he states, the concept of 'motivation' ignores the primordial freedom that is central to human existence, that the human being is freedom, that every person is condemned to be free. I (...)
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  50. John Stewart Gordon (2008). The Status of the in Vitro Embryo. Bioethics 22 (5):296–298.score: 30.0
    The volume presents 20 essays on the ontological, moral, and legal status of the in vitro embryo.
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