Search results for 'Grant Duncan' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Dave Stonor (Southern Cross University, Open Universities Australia)
  1. Grant Duncan (2000). Mind-Body Dualism and the Biopsychosocial Model of Pain: What Did Descartes Really Say? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (4):485 – 513.score: 240.0
    In the last two decades there have been many critics of western biomedicine's poor integration of social and psychological factors in questions of human health. Such critiques frequently begin with a rejection of Descartes' mind-body dualism, viewing this as the decisive philosophical moment, radically separating the two realms in both theory and practice. It is argued here, however, that many such readings of Descartes have been selective and misleading. Contrary to the assumptions of many recent authors, Descartes' dualism does attempt (...)
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  2. Hugh Duncan Grant (1937). Long-Range Weather Forecasting. Thought 12 (2):265-282.score: 240.0
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  3. George Parkin Grant (1995). George Grant in Conversation. Anansi.score: 210.0
    "Historian Ramsay Cook called George Grant one of Canadas two most important political thinkers in the twentieth century.
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  4. Dudley Duncan (1994). The Social Construction of the Senario and the Septimal Heresy: Response to Duncan. Sociological Theory 12 (3):319-327.score: 180.0
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  5. Judith Grant (1993). Fundamental Feminism: Contesting the Core Concepts of Feminist Theory. Routledge.score: 60.0
    What makes feminist theory feminist? How did so many different feminisms come to exist? In Fundamental Feminism, Judith Grant addresses these questions by offering a critical exploration of the evolution of feminist theory and the state of feminist thinking today. Grant provides a lively assessment of the major problems of contemporary feminist thought and identifies a set of common assumptions that link the wide variety of feminist theories in existence. Fundamental Feminism calls for nothing less than a substantial (...)
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  6. T. L. Duncan & J. S. Semura (2007). Information Loss as a Foundational Principle for the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Foundations of Physics 37 (12):1767-1773.score: 60.0
    In a previous paper (Duncan, T.L., Semura, J.S. in Entropy 6:21, 2004) we considered the question, “What underlying property of nature is responsible for the second law?” A simple answer can be stated in terms of information: The fundamental loss of information gives rise to the second law. This line of thinking highlights the existence of two independent but coupled sets of laws: Information dynamics and energy dynamics. The distinction helps shed light on certain foundational questions in statistical mechanics. (...)
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  7. Edward Grant (1981). Much Ado About Nothing: Theories of Space and Vacuum From the Middle Ages to the Scientific Revolution. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    The primary objective of this study is to provide a description of the major ideas about void space within and beyond the world that were formulated between the fourteenth and early eighteenth centuries. The second part of the book - on infinite, extracosmic void space - is of special significance. The significance of Professor Grant's account is twofold: it provides the first comprehensive and detailed description of the scholastic Aristotelian arguments for and against the existence of void space; and (...)
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  8. Ruth Weissbourd Grant (1997). Hypocrisy and Integrity: Machiavelli, Rousseau, and the Ethics of Politics. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    Questioning the usual judgements of political ethics, Ruth W. Grant argues that hypocrisy can actually be constructive while strictly principled behavior can be destructive. Hypocrisy and Integrity offers a new conceptual framework that clarifies the differences between idealism and fanaticism while it uncovers the moral limits of compromise. "Exciting and provocative. . . . Grant's work is to be highly recommended, offering a fresh reading of Rousseau and Machiavelli as well as presenting a penetrating analysis of hypocrisy and (...)
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  9. James Grant (2013). The Critical Imagination. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The Critical Imagination is a study of metaphor, imaginativeness, and criticism of the arts. Since the eighteenth century, many philosophers have argued that appreciating art is rewarding because it involves responding imaginatively to a work. Literary works can be interpreted in many ways; architecture can be seen as stately, meditative, or forbidding; and sensitive descriptions of art are often colourful metaphors: music can 'shimmer', prose can be 'perfumed', and a painter's colouring can be 'effervescent'. Engaging with art, like creating it, (...)
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  10. M. J. Grant (2001). Serial Music, Serial Aesthetics: Compositional Theory in Post-War Europe. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Serial music was one of the most important aesthetic movements to emerge in post-war Europe, but its uncompromising music and modernist aesthetic has often been misunderstood. This book focuses on the controversial journal die Reihe, whose major contributors included Stockhausen, Eimert, Pousseur, Dieter Schnebel and G. M. Koenig, and discusses it in connection with many lesser-known sources in German musicology. It traces serialism's debt to the theories of Klee and Mondrian, and its relationship to developments in concrete art, modern poetry (...)
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  11. Colin Grant (2001). Altruism and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Separated from its anchorage in religion, ethics has followed the social sciences in seeing human beings as fundamentally characterized by self-interest, so that altruism is either naively idealistic or arrogantly self-sufficient. Colin Grant contends that, as a modern secular concept, altruism is a parody on the self-giving love of Christianity, so that its dismissal represents a social levelling that loses the depths that theology makes intelligible and religion makes possible. The Christian affirmation is that God is characterized (...)
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  12. George Parkin Grant (1969). Time as History. [Toronto]Canadian Broadcasting Corp..score: 60.0
    In Time as History, a collection of his 1969 Massey lectures, George Grant reviews the thought of Nietzsche and concludes that the conception of time as history ...
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  13. George Parkin Grant (1974/1985). English-Speaking Justice. University of Notre Dame Press.score: 60.0
    George Grant's magnificent four-part meditation sums up much that is central to his own thought, including a critique of modern liberalism, an analysis of John Rawls's Theory of Justice, and insights into the larger Western philosophical ...
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  14. George Parkin Grant (1960). Philosophy in the Mass Age. New York, Hill and Wang.score: 60.0
    If Grant had not already been thinking the matter through for some time, he could not have prepared Philosophy in the Mass Age so quickly.
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  15. Bruce Duncan (2014). Handbook of Research on Development and Religion [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (1):124.score: 60.0
    Duncan, Bruce Review(s) of: Handbook of research on development and religion, edited by Matthew Clarke (Cheltenham UK: Edward Edgar, 2013), pp viii+ 602, hb, US$280.
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  16. Bruce Duncan (2014). Pope Francis's Call for Social Justice in the Global Economy. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (2):178.score: 60.0
    Duncan, Bruce Pope Francis sparked accusations that he is espousing Marxism in his November 2013 exhortation, The Joy of the Gospel, because of his pointed attacks on economic liberalism or neoliberalism, the ideology behind versions of free-market economics. The conservative US radio commentator, Rush Limbaugh, with a following of 20 million listeners on a program valued at $400 million, accused the Pope of sprouting 'pure Marxism', and of not knowing what he was talking about.
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  17. Humanities Visiting Scholar Grant (1992). Awards, Grants & Fellowships. Philosophy 8:1993.score: 60.0
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  18. Stewart Duncan (2005). Hobbes's Materialism in the Early 1640s. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (3):437 – 448.score: 30.0
    I argue that Hobbes isn't really a materialist in the early 1640s (in, e.g., the Third Objections to Descartes's Meditations). That is, he doesn't assert that bodies are the only substances. However, he does think that bodies are the only substances we can think about using imagistic ideas.
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  19. Ruth W. Grant (2002). Political Theory, Political Science, and Politics. Political Theory 30 (4):577-595.score: 30.0
  20. Colin Grant (1991). Friedman Fallacies. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (12):907 - 914.score: 30.0
    Milton Friedman's article, The Social Responsibility of Business Is To Increase Its Profits, owes its appeal to the rhetorical devices of simplicity, authority, and finality. More careful consideration reveals oversimplification and ambiguity that conceals empirical errors and logical fallacies. It is false that business does, or would, operate exclusively in economic terms, that managers concentrate obsessively on profitability, and that ethics can be marginalized. These errors reflect basic contradictions: an apolitical political base, altruistic agents of selfishness, and good deriving from (...)
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  21. Pierre Rainville, Rrrobert K. Hofbauer, M. Catherine Bushnell, Gary H. Duncan & Donald D. Price (2002). Hypnosis Modulates Activity in Brain Structures Involved in the Regulation of Consciousness. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 14 (6):887-901.score: 30.0
  22. Brian Grant (2001). The Virtues of Common Sense. Philosophy 76 (2):191-209.score: 30.0
    I defend, in this paper, a version of a philosophy of common sense. I have use of some things from Reid's account of these matters, others from Wittgenstein's. Scepticism looms large—as do the questions of arguments for and examples of common sense. At least two different notions of common sense emerge, one of which has often been overlooked by philosophers.
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  23. Donald C. Grant (2002). Becoming Conscious and Schizophrenia. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 4 (1):199-207.score: 30.0
  24. Craig Duncan (2003). Do Vague Probabilities Really Scotch Pascal's Wager? Philosophical Studies 112 (3):279 - 290.score: 30.0
    Alan Hájek has recently argued that certain assignments of vague probability defeat Pascals Wager. In particular, he argues that skeptical agnostics – those whose probability for God''s existence is vague over an interval containing zero – have nothing to fear from Pascal. In this paper, I make two arguments against Hájek: (1) that skeptical agnosticism is a form of dogmatism, and as such should be rejected; (2) that in any case, choice situations with vague probability assignments ought to be treated (...)
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  25. Colin Grant (1999). Theodore Levitt's Marketing Myopia. Journal of Business Ethics 18 (4):397 - 406.score: 30.0
    Theodore Levitt criticizes John Kenneth Galbraith's view of advertising as artificial want creation, contending that its selling focus on the product fails to appreciate the marketing focus on the consumer. But Levitt himself not only ends up endorsing selling; he fails to confront the fact that the marketing to our most pervasive needs that he advocates really represents a sophisticated form of selling. He avoids facing this by the fiction that marketing is concerned only with the material level of existence, (...)
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  26. John Grant (1987). On Reading Collingwood's Principles of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46 (2):239-248.score: 30.0
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  27. Craig Duncan, Democratic Liberalism:The Politics of Dignity.score: 30.0
    (a chapter from my book Libertarianism:For and Against).
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  28. Robert Grant (2001). Fiction, Meaning, and Utterance. Inquiry 44 (4):389 – 403.score: 30.0
    A Gricean preamble concludes that though utterances have unintended meanings, those cannot be considered apart from their intended meanings. Intention distinguishes artworks from natural phenomena. To allocate an artwork to a genre, to accept its normal authorial boundaries and that its content is not random but chosen, is to concede intention's centrality. Wimsatt and Beardsley were right that meaning is public. But they think 'intention' is 'private' or 'unavailable'. However, it too is public, in the work. Fictions are utterances of (...)
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  29. Ruth W. Grant (2002). The Ethics of Incentives: Historical Origins and Contemporary Understandings. Economics and Philosophy 18 (1):111-139.score: 30.0
    Increasingly in the modern world, incentives are becoming the tool we reach for when we wish to bring about change. In government, in education, in health care, between and within institutions of all sorts, incentives are offered to steer people's choices in certain directions. But despite the increasing interest in ethics and economics, the ethics of the use of incentives has raised very little concern. From a certain point of view, this is not surprising. When incentives are viewed from the (...)
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  30. Iain Hamilton Grant (2005). The "Eternal and Necessary Bond Between Philosophy and Physics&Quot;. Angelaki 10 (1):43 – 59.score: 30.0
    (2005). The “eternal and necessary bond between Philosophy and Physics”1. Angelaki: Vol. 10, continental philosophy and the sciences the german traditionissue editor: damian veal, pp. 43-59.
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  31. Colin Grant (2002). Whistle Blowers: Saints of Secular Culture. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 39 (4):391 - 399.score: 30.0
    Neither the corporate view of whistle blowers as tattle-tales and traitors, nor the more sympathethic understanding of them as tragic heroes battling corrupt or abused systems captures what is at stake in whistle blowing at its most distinctive. The courage, determination and sacrifice of the most ardent whistle blowers suggests that they only begin to be appreciated when they are seen as the saints of secular culture. Although some whistle blowers may be attempting to deflect attention from their own deficiencies (...)
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  32. Elmer H. Duncan (1970). The Ideal Aesthetic Observer: A Second Look. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 29 (1):47-52.score: 30.0
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  33. Seth Duncan & Lisa Feldman Barrett (2007). The Role of the Amygdala in Visual Awareness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (5):190-192.score: 30.0
  34. C. K. Grant (1957). Certainty, Necessity and Aristotle's Sea Battle. Mind 66 (264):522-531.score: 30.0
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  35. Ruth W. Grant & Jeremy Sugarman (2004). Ethics in Human Subjects Research: Do Incentives Matter? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (6):717 – 738.score: 30.0
    There is considerable confusion regarding the ethical appropriateness of using incentives in research with human subjects. Previous work on determining whether incentives are unethical considers them as a form of undue influence or coercive offer. We understand the ethical issue of undue influence as an issue, not of coercion, but of corruption of judgment. By doing so we find that, for the most part, the use of incentives to recruit and retain research subjects is innocuous. But there are some instances (...)
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  36. W. Matthews Grant (2007). Must a Cause Be Really Related to its Effect? The Analogy Between Divine and Libertarian Agent Causality. Religious Studies 43 (1):1-23.score: 30.0
    According to a classical teaching, God is not really related to creatures even by virtue of creating them. Some have objected that this teaching makes unintelligible the claim that God causally accounts for the universe, since God would be the same whether the universe existed or not. I defend the classical teaching, showing how the doctrine is implied by a popular cosmological argument, showing that the objection to it would also rule out libertarian agent causality, and showing that the objection (...)
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  37. Dean E. Allmon & James Grant (1990). Real Estate Sales Agents and the Code of Ethics: A Voice Stress Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 9 (10):807 - 812.score: 30.0
    This study evaluates responses to the Real Estate Ethical Code. Voice Stress Analysis (VSA) is used to evaluate the responses of real estate sales people to ethically-based questions. The process and the responses given enabled the authors to gain insight into pressure-causing ethical situations and to explore new uses of VSA. Some respondents were stressed while following the ethical code guidelines. Others showed no stress about breaking the formal code. The study reaffirms that the presence of formal ethical guidelines does (...)
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  38. J. Gosling, Alan R. White, John Arthur Passmore, William Kneale, Don Locke, C. K. Grant, Thomas McPherson, Peter Nidditch, Martha Kneale, A. C. Ewing & W. F. Hicken (1965). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 74 (293):126-153.score: 30.0
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  39. Edward Grant (2004). Scientific Imagination in the Middle Ages. Perspectives on Science 12 (4):394-423.score: 30.0
    : Following Aristotle, medieval natural philosophers believed that knowledge was ultimately based on perception and observation; and like Aristotle, they also believed that observation could not explain the "why" of any perception. To arrive at the "why," natural philosophers offered theoretical explanations that required the use of the imagination. This was, however, only the starting point. Not only did they apply their imaginations to real phenomena, but expended even more intellectual energy on counterfactual phenomena, both extracosmic and intracosmic, extensively discussing, (...)
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  40. Isaiah Berlin, P. F. Strawson, R. Rhees, F. E. Sparshott, Michael Scriven, R. F. Holland, Jonathan Harrison, H. G. Alexander, C. A. Mace, J. L. Evans, D. A. Rees, W. Mays, C. K. Grant, Basil Mitchell & G. C. J. Midgley (1952). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 61 (243):405-439.score: 30.0
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  41. Ruth W. Grant (1994). Integrity and Politics: An Alternative Reading of Rousseau. Political Theory 22 (3):414-443.score: 30.0
  42. C. K. Grant (1949). Promises. Mind 58 (231):359-366.score: 30.0
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  43. Edward Grant (1984). Were There Significant Differences Between Medieval and Early Modern Scholastic Natural Philosophy? The Case for Cosmology. Noûs 18 (1):5-14.score: 30.0
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  44. Stephen Toulmin, M. Dummett, P. B. Medawar, J. O. Urmson, G. J. Warnock, C. K. Grant, Antony Flew, Mary Scrutton, A. C. Ewing, R. C. Cross, Richard Robinson, D. J. Allan, L. Minio-Paluello, D. P. Henry & H. J. N. Horsburgh (1954). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 63 (249):100-123.score: 30.0
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  45. Howard Duncan (1984). Inertia, the Communication of Motion, and Kant's Third Law of Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 51 (1):93-119.score: 30.0
    In Kant's Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science are found a dynamist reduction of matter and an account of the communication of motion by impact. One would expect to find an analysis of the causal mechanism involved in the communication of motion between bodies given in terms of the fundamental dynamical nature of bodies. However, Kant's analysis, as given in the discussion of his third law of mechanics (an action-reaction law) is purely kinematical, invoking no causal mechanisms at all, let alone (...)
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  46. Otis Dudley Duncan (1986). Probability, Disposition, and the Inconsistency of Attitudes and Behavior. Synthese 68 (1):65 - 98.score: 30.0
    Inconsistency of attitudes and behavior is due to the probabilistic connection between responses or actions and the (not directly observable) dispositions on which they depend. Latent variable models provide criteria for recognizing when attitude and behavior depend on the same disposition. Statistical tests of such models and techniques of parameter estimation are described. The viewpoint proposed here and illustrated with empirical examples contrasts with the prevalent reliance on correlational models and methods.
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  47. Robert Grant (1998). Not Enough, or Thinking Degree Zero. Inquiry 41 (4):477 – 496.score: 30.0
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  48. C. D. Broad, Richard Robinson, H. B. Acton, George E. Hughes, T. D. Weldon, Mario M. Rossi, A. C. Ewing, C. J. Holloway, J. P. Corbett, C. W. K. Mundle, W. B. Gallie, W. Mays, A. H. Armstrong, C. K. Grant & I. M. Cromble (1949). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 58 (229):101-130.score: 30.0
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  49. John Rawls, Stephen Toulmin, G. J. Warnock, B. E. King, R. F. Holland & C. K. Grant (1955). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 64 (255):421-432.score: 30.0
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  50. W. Charlton, Aurel Kolnai, C. K. Grant, Martin Hollis, J. M. Hinton, P. L. Mott, K. K. Baublys, Y. N. Chopra, G. R. Grice, R. F. Atkinson, Christine Atkinson & Stuart C. Brown (1973). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 82 (327):452-479.score: 30.0
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