Search results for 'Grant Goodrich' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Grant Goodrich (University of Northern Iowa)
Profile: Grant Goodrich
  1. Andrew McAninch, Grant Goodrich & Colin Allen (2009). Animal Communication and Neo-Expressivism. In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. 128--144.score: 240.0
    One of the earliest issues in cognitive ethology concerned the meaning of animal signals. In the 1970s and 1980s this debate was most active with respect to the question of whether animal alarm calls convey information about the emotional states of animals or whether they “refer” directly to predators in the environment (Seyfarth, Cheney, & Marler 1980; see Radick 2007 for a historical account), but other areas, such as vocalizations about food and social contact, were also widely discussed. In the (...)
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  2. George Parkin Grant (1995). George Grant in Conversation. Anansi.score: 210.0
    "Historian Ramsay Cook called George Grant one of Canadas two most important political thinkers in the twentieth century.
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  3. Thomas D. Goodrich (forthcoming). Luther Carrington Goodrich (1894-1986): A Bibliography. Journal of the American Oriental Society.score: 180.0
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  4. Judith Grant (1993). Fundamental Feminism: Contesting the Core Concepts of Feminist Theory. Routledge.score: 60.0
    What makes feminist theory feminist? How did so many different feminisms come to exist? In Fundamental Feminism, Judith Grant addresses these questions by offering a critical exploration of the evolution of feminist theory and the state of feminist thinking today. Grant provides a lively assessment of the major problems of contemporary feminist thought and identifies a set of common assumptions that link the wide variety of feminist theories in existence. Fundamental Feminism calls for nothing less than a substantial (...)
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  5. Edward Grant (1981). Much Ado About Nothing: Theories of Space and Vacuum From the Middle Ages to the Scientific Revolution. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    The primary objective of this study is to provide a description of the major ideas about void space within and beyond the world that were formulated between the fourteenth and early eighteenth centuries. The second part of the book - on infinite, extracosmic void space - is of special significance. The significance of Professor Grant's account is twofold: it provides the first comprehensive and detailed description of the scholastic Aristotelian arguments for and against the existence of void space; and (...)
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  6. Ruth Weissbourd Grant (1997). Hypocrisy and Integrity: Machiavelli, Rousseau, and the Ethics of Politics. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    Questioning the usual judgements of political ethics, Ruth W. Grant argues that hypocrisy can actually be constructive while strictly principled behavior can be destructive. Hypocrisy and Integrity offers a new conceptual framework that clarifies the differences between idealism and fanaticism while it uncovers the moral limits of compromise. "Exciting and provocative. . . . Grant's work is to be highly recommended, offering a fresh reading of Rousseau and Machiavelli as well as presenting a penetrating analysis of hypocrisy and (...)
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  7. James Grant (2013). The Critical Imagination. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The Critical Imagination is a study of metaphor, imaginativeness, and criticism of the arts. Since the eighteenth century, many philosophers have argued that appreciating art is rewarding because it involves responding imaginatively to a work. Literary works can be interpreted in many ways; architecture can be seen as stately, meditative, or forbidding; and sensitive descriptions of art are often colourful metaphors: music can 'shimmer', prose can be 'perfumed', and a painter's colouring can be 'effervescent'. Engaging with art, like creating it, (...)
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  8. M. J. Grant (2001). Serial Music, Serial Aesthetics: Compositional Theory in Post-War Europe. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Serial music was one of the most important aesthetic movements to emerge in post-war Europe, but its uncompromising music and modernist aesthetic has often been misunderstood. This book focuses on the controversial journal die Reihe, whose major contributors included Stockhausen, Eimert, Pousseur, Dieter Schnebel and G. M. Koenig, and discusses it in connection with many lesser-known sources in German musicology. It traces serialism's debt to the theories of Klee and Mondrian, and its relationship to developments in concrete art, modern poetry (...)
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  9. Colin Grant (2001). Altruism and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Separated from its anchorage in religion, ethics has followed the social sciences in seeing human beings as fundamentally characterized by self-interest, so that altruism is either naively idealistic or arrogantly self-sufficient. Colin Grant contends that, as a modern secular concept, altruism is a parody on the self-giving love of Christianity, so that its dismissal represents a social levelling that loses the depths that theology makes intelligible and religion makes possible. The Christian affirmation is that God is characterized (...)
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  10. George Parkin Grant (1969). Time as History. [Toronto]Canadian Broadcasting Corp..score: 60.0
    In Time as History, a collection of his 1969 Massey lectures, George Grant reviews the thought of Nietzsche and concludes that the conception of time as history ...
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  11. George Parkin Grant (1974/1985). English-Speaking Justice. University of Notre Dame Press.score: 60.0
    George Grant's magnificent four-part meditation sums up much that is central to his own thought, including a critique of modern liberalism, an analysis of John Rawls's Theory of Justice, and insights into the larger Western philosophical ...
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  12. George Parkin Grant (1960). Philosophy in the Mass Age. New York, Hill and Wang.score: 60.0
    If Grant had not already been thinking the matter through for some time, he could not have prepared Philosophy in the Mass Age so quickly.
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  13. Humanities Visiting Scholar Grant (1992). Awards, Grants & Fellowships. Philosophy 8:1993.score: 60.0
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  14. Ruth W. Grant (2002). Political Theory, Political Science, and Politics. Political Theory 30 (4):577-595.score: 30.0
  15. Colin Grant (1991). Friedman Fallacies. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (12):907 - 914.score: 30.0
    Milton Friedman's article, The Social Responsibility of Business Is To Increase Its Profits, owes its appeal to the rhetorical devices of simplicity, authority, and finality. More careful consideration reveals oversimplification and ambiguity that conceals empirical errors and logical fallacies. It is false that business does, or would, operate exclusively in economic terms, that managers concentrate obsessively on profitability, and that ethics can be marginalized. These errors reflect basic contradictions: an apolitical political base, altruistic agents of selfishness, and good deriving from (...)
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  16. Brian Grant (2001). The Virtues of Common Sense. Philosophy 76 (2):191-209.score: 30.0
    I defend, in this paper, a version of a philosophy of common sense. I have use of some things from Reid's account of these matters, others from Wittgenstein's. Scepticism looms large—as do the questions of arguments for and examples of common sense. At least two different notions of common sense emerge, one of which has often been overlooked by philosophers.
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  17. Donald C. Grant (2002). Becoming Conscious and Schizophrenia. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 4 (1):199-207.score: 30.0
  18. Colin Grant (1999). Theodore Levitt's Marketing Myopia. Journal of Business Ethics 18 (4):397 - 406.score: 30.0
    Theodore Levitt criticizes John Kenneth Galbraith's view of advertising as artificial want creation, contending that its selling focus on the product fails to appreciate the marketing focus on the consumer. But Levitt himself not only ends up endorsing selling; he fails to confront the fact that the marketing to our most pervasive needs that he advocates really represents a sophisticated form of selling. He avoids facing this by the fiction that marketing is concerned only with the material level of existence, (...)
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  19. R. A. Goodrich (1996). Analyticity, Meaning, and Education: A Critique of a Quinean Dogma. Educational Philosophy and Theory 28 (2):27–41.score: 30.0
  20. John Grant (1987). On Reading Collingwood's Principles of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46 (2):239-248.score: 30.0
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  21. R. A. Goodrich (1982). Plato on Poetry and Painting. British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (2):126-137.score: 30.0
  22. Robert Grant (2001). Fiction, Meaning, and Utterance. Inquiry 44 (4):389 – 403.score: 30.0
    A Gricean preamble concludes that though utterances have unintended meanings, those cannot be considered apart from their intended meanings. Intention distinguishes artworks from natural phenomena. To allocate an artwork to a genre, to accept its normal authorial boundaries and that its content is not random but chosen, is to concede intention's centrality. Wimsatt and Beardsley were right that meaning is public. But they think 'intention' is 'private' or 'unavailable'. However, it too is public, in the work. Fictions are utterances of (...)
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  23. Ruth W. Grant (2002). The Ethics of Incentives: Historical Origins and Contemporary Understandings. Economics and Philosophy 18 (1):111-139.score: 30.0
    Increasingly in the modern world, incentives are becoming the tool we reach for when we wish to bring about change. In government, in education, in health care, between and within institutions of all sorts, incentives are offered to steer people's choices in certain directions. But despite the increasing interest in ethics and economics, the ethics of the use of incentives has raised very little concern. From a certain point of view, this is not surprising. When incentives are viewed from the (...)
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  24. Peter Goodrich (1999). Anti-Teubner: Autopoiesis, Paradox, and the Theory of Law. Social Epistemology 13 (2):197 – 214.score: 30.0
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  25. Iain Hamilton Grant (2005). The "Eternal and Necessary Bond Between Philosophy and Physics&Quot;. Angelaki 10 (1):43 – 59.score: 30.0
    (2005). The “eternal and necessary bond between Philosophy and Physics”1. Angelaki: Vol. 10, continental philosophy and the sciences the german traditionissue editor: damian veal, pp. 43-59.
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  26. Ruth W. Grant & Jeremy Sugarman (2004). Ethics in Human Subjects Research: Do Incentives Matter? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (6):717 – 738.score: 30.0
    There is considerable confusion regarding the ethical appropriateness of using incentives in research with human subjects. Previous work on determining whether incentives are unethical considers them as a form of undue influence or coercive offer. We understand the ethical issue of undue influence as an issue, not of coercion, but of corruption of judgment. By doing so we find that, for the most part, the use of incentives to recruit and retain research subjects is innocuous. But there are some instances (...)
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  27. Costas Douzinas, Peter Goodrich & Yifat Hachamovitch (eds.) (1994). Politics, Postmodernity, and Critical Legal Studies: The Legality of the Contingent. Routledge.score: 30.0
    Laws of Postmodernity is the first work of legal scholarship to apply postmodern jurisprudence to an analysis of a number of substantive areas of law. In analyzing the cultural significance of law, the contributors show how critical jurisprudential analysis undermines positivistic attempts to support a normative viewpoint of the legal order. In addition, they criticize contextual, sociological accounts of legal phenomena. The contributors explore blasphemy laws in the wake of the Salman Rushdie affair, and French critical legal theory-- particularly the (...)
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  28. R. A. Goodrich (1988). Goodman on Representation and Resemblance. British Journal of Aesthetics 28 (1):48-58.score: 30.0
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  29. C. K. Grant (1957). Certainty, Necessity and Aristotle's Sea Battle. Mind 66 (264):522-531.score: 30.0
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  30. W. Matthews Grant (2007). Must a Cause Be Really Related to its Effect? The Analogy Between Divine and Libertarian Agent Causality. Religious Studies 43 (1):1-23.score: 30.0
    According to a classical teaching, God is not really related to creatures even by virtue of creating them. Some have objected that this teaching makes unintelligible the claim that God causally accounts for the universe, since God would be the same whether the universe existed or not. I defend the classical teaching, showing how the doctrine is implied by a popular cosmological argument, showing that the objection to it would also rule out libertarian agent causality, and showing that the objection (...)
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  31. Colin Grant (2002). Whistle Blowers: Saints of Secular Culture. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 39 (4):391 - 399.score: 30.0
    Neither the corporate view of whistle blowers as tattle-tales and traitors, nor the more sympathethic understanding of them as tragic heroes battling corrupt or abused systems captures what is at stake in whistle blowing at its most distinctive. The courage, determination and sacrifice of the most ardent whistle blowers suggests that they only begin to be appreciated when they are seen as the saints of secular culture. Although some whistle blowers may be attempting to deflect attention from their own deficiencies (...)
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  32. Dean E. Allmon & James Grant (1990). Real Estate Sales Agents and the Code of Ethics: A Voice Stress Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 9 (10):807 - 812.score: 30.0
    This study evaluates responses to the Real Estate Ethical Code. Voice Stress Analysis (VSA) is used to evaluate the responses of real estate sales people to ethically-based questions. The process and the responses given enabled the authors to gain insight into pressure-causing ethical situations and to explore new uses of VSA. Some respondents were stressed while following the ethical code guidelines. Others showed no stress about breaking the formal code. The study reaffirms that the presence of formal ethical guidelines does (...)
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  33. J. Gosling, Alan R. White, John Arthur Passmore, William Kneale, Don Locke, C. K. Grant, Thomas McPherson, Peter Nidditch, Martha Kneale, A. C. Ewing & W. F. Hicken (1965). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 74 (293):126-153.score: 30.0
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  34. Edward Grant (2004). Scientific Imagination in the Middle Ages. Perspectives on Science 12 (4):394-423.score: 30.0
    : Following Aristotle, medieval natural philosophers believed that knowledge was ultimately based on perception and observation; and like Aristotle, they also believed that observation could not explain the "why" of any perception. To arrive at the "why," natural philosophers offered theoretical explanations that required the use of the imagination. This was, however, only the starting point. Not only did they apply their imaginations to real phenomena, but expended even more intellectual energy on counterfactual phenomena, both extracosmic and intracosmic, extensively discussing, (...)
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  35. Isaiah Berlin, P. F. Strawson, R. Rhees, F. E. Sparshott, Michael Scriven, R. F. Holland, Jonathan Harrison, H. G. Alexander, C. A. Mace, J. L. Evans, D. A. Rees, W. Mays, C. K. Grant, Basil Mitchell & G. C. J. Midgley (1952). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 61 (243):405-439.score: 30.0
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  36. Ruth W. Grant (1994). Integrity and Politics: An Alternative Reading of Rousseau. Political Theory 22 (3):414-443.score: 30.0
  37. Edward Grant (1993). Jean Buridan and Nicole Oresme on Natural Knowledge. Vivarium 31 (1):84-105.score: 30.0
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  38. Edward Grant (1984). Were There Significant Differences Between Medieval and Early Modern Scholastic Natural Philosophy? The Case for Cosmology. Noûs 18 (1):5-14.score: 30.0
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  39. Stephen Toulmin, M. Dummett, P. B. Medawar, J. O. Urmson, G. J. Warnock, C. K. Grant, Antony Flew, Mary Scrutton, A. C. Ewing, R. C. Cross, Richard Robinson, D. J. Allan, L. Minio-Paluello, D. P. Henry & H. J. N. Horsburgh (1954). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 63 (249):100-123.score: 30.0
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  40. C. K. Grant (1949). Promises. Mind 58 (231):359-366.score: 30.0
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  41. Robert Grant (1998). Not Enough, or Thinking Degree Zero. Inquiry 41 (4):477 – 496.score: 30.0
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  42. C. D. Broad, Richard Robinson, H. B. Acton, George E. Hughes, T. D. Weldon, Mario M. Rossi, A. C. Ewing, C. J. Holloway, J. P. Corbett, C. W. K. Mundle, W. B. Gallie, W. Mays, A. H. Armstrong, C. K. Grant & I. M. Cromble (1949). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 58 (229):101-130.score: 30.0
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  43. R. A. Goodrich (1991). Danto on Artistic Indiscernibility, Interpretation and Relations. British Journal of Aesthetics 31 (4):356-362.score: 30.0
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  44. Michael A. Goodrich, Wynn C. Stirling & Erwin R. Boer (2000). Satisficing Revisited. Minds and Machines 10 (1):79-109.score: 30.0
    In the debate between simple inference heuristics and complex decision mechanisms, we take a position squarely in the middle. A decision making process that extends to both naturalistic and novel settings should extend beyond the confines of this debate; both simple heuristics and complex mechanisms are cognitive skills adapted to and appropriate for some circumstances but not for others. Rather than ask `Which skill is better?'' it is often more important to ask `When is a skill justified?'' The selection and (...)
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  45. W. Charlton, Aurel Kolnai, C. K. Grant, Martin Hollis, J. M. Hinton, P. L. Mott, K. K. Baublys, Y. N. Chopra, G. R. Grice, R. F. Atkinson, Christine Atkinson & Stuart C. Brown (1973). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 82 (327):452-479.score: 30.0
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  46. John Grant & V. S. Subrahmanian (2000). Applications of Paraconsistency in Data and Knowledge Bases. Synthese 125 (1-2):121-132.score: 30.0
    The study of paraconsistent logic as a branch of mathematics and logic has been pioneered by Newton da Costa. With the growing advent of distributed and often inconsistent databases over the last ten years, there has been growing interest in paraconsistency amongst researchers in databases and knowledge bases. In this paper, we provide a brief survey of work in paraconsistent databases and knowledge bases affected by Newton da Costa's important and lasting contributions to the field.
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  47. Eugene W. Grant & Lowell S. Broom (1988). Attitudes Toward Ethics: A View of the College Student. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 7 (8):617 - 619.score: 30.0
    This study investigated the differences in responses of undergraduate business students to an ethical dilemma. Demographic characteristics were collected on the respondents and profiled as a means of examining common bases for decision. The authors found that certain demographic characteristics appear to be predictors of ethical decision behavior of future businessmen.
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  48. John Rawls, Stephen Toulmin, G. J. Warnock, B. E. King, R. F. Holland & C. K. Grant (1955). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 64 (255):421-432.score: 30.0
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  49. Norman A. Solomon & Rebecca A. Grant (1983). Canadian Trade Unionism and Wage Parity for Women: Putting the Principle Into Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 2 (3):213 - 219.score: 30.0
    This article examines the conceptual impact of equal pay legislation on Canadian trade unionism. Ambiguous, largely voluntary, legislation poses major challenges to unions negotiating wage parity for their members. Furthermore, the movement finds itself caught between conflicting responsibilities as champion of the underpaid and protector of traditional interests. The authors examine this challenge within the context of the historic development, and fundamental principles of trade unionism. They conclude that many of the conflicts discussed arise directly from established union practices and (...)
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  50. C. H. Whiteley, C. K. Grant, Alan Montefiore, Ronald W. Hepburn, H. J. Paton, P. H. Nowell-Smith, A. D. Woozley & J. A. Faris (1959). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 68 (272):556-574.score: 30.0
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