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  1. Grant R. Gillett (2008). Surgical Innovation and Research. In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press. 367.
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  2. John McMillan & Grant R. Gillett (2005). Moral Responsibility, Consciousness and Psychiatry. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 39 (11):1018-1021.
  3. Grant R. Gillett (2004). Cognition: Brain Pain: Psychotic Cognition, Hallucinations, and Delusions. In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 21.
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  4. Grant R. Gillett (2004). The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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  5. Grant R. Gillett (2003). Work and Talk: Handedness and the Stuff of Life. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):222-223.
    Wittgenstein shifted from a picture theory of meaning to a use-based theory of meaning in his philosophical work on language. The latter picture is deeply congenial to the view that language and the use of our hands in practical activity are closely related. Wittgenstein's theory therefore offers philosophical support for Corballis's suggestion that the development of spoken language is the basis of dominance phenomena.
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  6. Grant R. Gillett (2001). Free Will and Events in the Brain. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (3):287-310.
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  7. Grant R. Gillett & John McMillan (2001). Consciousness and Intentionality. John Benjamins.
    This book considers questions such as these and argues for a conception of consciousness, mental content and intentionality that is anti-Cartesian in its major...
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  8. Grant R. Gillett (1997). A Discursive Account of Multiple Personality Disorder. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (3):213-22.
  9. Grant R. Gillett (1995). Consciousness, Thought, and Neurological Integrity. Journal of Mind and Behavior 16 (3):215-33.
  10. Grant R. Gillett (1995). Humpty Dumpty and the Night of the Triffids: Individualism and Rule-Following. Synthese 105 (2):191-206.
  11. Christopher D. Green & Grant R. Gillett (1995). Are Mental Events Preceded by Their Physical Causes? Philosophical Psychology 8 (4):333-340.
    Libet's experiments, supported by a strict one-to-one identity thesis between brain events and mental events, have prompted the conclusion that physical events precede the mental events to which they correspond. We examine this claim and conclude that it is suspect for several reasons. First, there is a dual assumption that an intention is the kind of thing that causes an action and that can be accurately introspected. Second, there is a real problem with the method of timing the mental events (...)
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  12. Grant R. Gillett (1994). 10 Women and Children First. In K. W. M. Fulford, Grant Gillett & Janet Martin Soskice (eds.), Medicine and Moral Reasoning. Cambridge University Press. 3--131.
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  13. Grant R. Gillett (1993). Freedom of the Will and Mental Content. Ratio 6 (2):89-107.
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  14. Grant R. Gillett (1993). Learning to Do No Harm. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):253-268.
    The legalisation of euthanasia creates a certain tension when it is compared with those traditional medical principles that seem to embody respect for the sanctity of life. It also creates a real need for us to explore what we mean by harm in relation to dying patients. When we consider that we must train physicians so that they not only understand ethical issues but also show the virtues in their clinical practice, it becomes important for us to strive to train (...)
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  15. Grant R. Gillett (1993). Social Causation and Cognitive Neuroscience. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 23 (1):27–45.
  16. Grant R. Gillett (1992). Consciousness, Intentionality and Internalism: A Philosophical Perspective on Velmans and His Critics. Philosophical Psychology 5 (2):173-179.
  17. Grant R. Gillett (1992). Representation, Meaning, and Thought. Oxford University Press.
    This study examines the relationship between thought and language by considering the views of Kant and the later Wittgenstein along with many strands of contemporary debate in the area of mental content. Building on an analysis of the nature of concepts and conceptions of objects, Gillett provides an account of psychological explanation and the subject of experience, offers a novel perspective on mental representation and linguistic meaning, looks at the difficult topics of cognitive roles and singular thought, and concludes with (...)
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  18. Grant R. Gillett (1992). Unpacking the Black Box of Cognition. Inquiry 35 (3-4):463-472.
  19. Grant R. Gillett (1991). The Neurophilosophy of Pain. Philosophy 66 (April):191-206.
  20. Grant R. Gillett (1990). Neuropsychology and Meaning in Psychiatry. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (1):21-39.
    The relationship between "causal" and "meaningful" (Jaspers) influences on behavior is explored. The nature of meaning essentially involves rules and the human practices in which they are imparted to a person and have a formative influence on that person's thinking. The meanings that come to be discerned in life experience are then important in influencing the shape of that person's conduct. The reasoning and motivational structures that develop on this basis are realized by the shape of the neural processing networks (...)
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  21. Grant R. Gillett (1989). Perception and Neuroscience. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (March) 83 (March):83-103.
    Perception is often analysed as a process in which causal events from the environment act on a subject to produce states in the mind or brain. The role of the subject is an increasing feature of neuroscientific and cognitive literature. This feature is linked to the need for an account of the normative aspects of perceptual competence. A holographic model is offered in which objects are presented to the subject classified according to rules governing concepts and encoded in brain function (...)
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  22. Grant R. Gillett (1989). Representations and Cognitive Science. Inquiry 32 (September):261-77.
    ?Representation? is a concept which occurs both in cognitive science and philosophy. It has common features in both settings in that it concerns the explanation of behaviour in terms of the way the subject categorizes and systematizes responses to its environment. The prevailing model sees representations as causally structured entities correlated on the one hand with elements in a natural language and on the other with clearly identifiable items in the world. This leads to an analysis of representation and cognition (...)
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  23. Grant R. Gillett (1988). Consciousness and Brain Function. Philosophical Psychology 1 (3):325-39.
    Abstract The language of consciousness and that of brain function seem vastly different and incommensurable ways of approaching human mental life. If we look at what we mean by consciousness we find that it has a great deal to do with the sensitivity and responsiveness shown by a subject toward things that happen. Philosophically, we can understnd ascriptions of consciousness best by looking at the conditions which make it true for thinkers who share the concept to say that one of (...)
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  24. Grant R. Gillett (1988). Learning to Perceive. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (June):601-618.
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  25. Grant R. Gillett (1987). Concepts, Structures, and Meanings. Inquiry 30 (March):101-112.
    Concepts are basic elements of thought. Piaget has a conception of the nature of concepts as informational or computational operations performed in an inner milieu and enabling the child to understand the world in which it lives and acts. Concepts are, however, not merely logico?mathematical but are also conceptually linked to the mastery of language which itself involves the appropriate use of words in social and interpersonal settings. In the light of Vygotsky's work on the social and interactive nature of (...)
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  26. Grant R. Gillett (1987). Reasoning About Persons. In Arthur R. Peacocke & Grant R. Gillett (eds.), Persons and Personality: A Contemporary Inquiry. Blackwell.
     
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  27. Grant R. Gillett (1987). The Generality Constraint and Conscious Thought. Analysis 47 (January):20-24.
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  28. Arthur R. Peacocke & Grant R. Gillett (eds.) (1987). Persons and Personality: A Contemporary Inquiry. Blackwell.
  29. Grant R. Gillett (1986). Brain Bisection and Personal Identity. Mind 95 (April):224-9.
    It has been argued that 'brain bisection' data leads us to abandon our traditional conception of personal identity. Nagel has remarked: The ultimate account of the unity of what we call a single mind consists of an enumeration of the types of functional integration that typify it. We know that these can be eroded in different ways and to different degrees. The belief that even in their complete version they can be explained by the presence of a numerically single subject (...)
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  30. Grant R. Gillett (1986). Disembodied Persons. Philosophy 61 (July):377-386.
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  31. Grant R. Gillett (1986). Multiple Personality and the Concept of a Person. New Ideas in Psychology 4:173-84.
     
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  32. Grant R. Gillett (1985). Brain, Mind and Soul. Zygon 20 (December):425-434.